Here's one I'll bet you don't hear every day

  1. Well, I'm sure this will get flamed by some people, but I'm hoping for mostly positive/constructive feedback.

    I'm a practicing DC (Doctor of Chiropractic) who is applying to accelerated BSN/FNP programs. I'm not disillusioned with my profession, and I would say I'm very good at what I do. I have more than enough income to keep me happy so it's not about money. I just want to be able to do more for my patients. I found that more than half of the patients in my practice either hate their PCP, or don't even have one. Plus, I've been trying to get some kind of an affiliation with a hospital in the NYC area (my practice is in Park Slope, Brooklyn) so I think being an NP will help me. I plan on practicing both, family medicine and chiropractic medicine.

    Any thoughts/suggestions/comments would be appreciated. Do you think I'll have it easier/tougher/about the same as other students? Do you think that having 7 years experience will help me or hurt me? Do you think that I will get it tougher during hospital rotations if people know that I'm a chiropractor?
    Last edit by chirodoc on May 11, '09
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    About chirodoc

    Joined: May '09; Posts: 13; Likes: 1
    Doctor of Chiropractic/Nursing Student

    12 Comments

  3. by   ~Mi Vida Loca~RN
    I have no idea about any of that so I am of no help, but I just wanted to say, I love my chiropractor. He has totally changed my life!!!!!
  4. by   nursel56
    I don't think anyone would flame you! We're mostly a friendly lot. There are many nursing students who have degrees in other areas,some healthcare related, some not. I think most people will value your perspective and life experience.

    There is one thing I can guarantee WILL happen, though. You'll be deluged with requests to fix "Oh, my 'achin back" once they find out you're a chiropractor!!:wink2:
  5. by   sissiesmama
    Quote from chirodoc
    Well, I'm sure this will get flamed by some people, but I'm hoping for mostly positive/constructive feedback.

    I'm a practicing DC (Doctor of Chiropractic) who is applying to accelerated BSN/FNP programs. I'm not disillusioned with my profession, and I would say I'm very good at what I do. I have more than enough income to keep me happy so it's not about money. I just want to be able to do more for my patients. I found that more than half of the patients in my practice either hate their PCP, or don't even have one. Plus, I've been trying to get some kind of an affiliation with a hospital in the NYC area (my practice is in Park Slope, Brooklyn) so I think being an NP will help me. I plan on practicing both, family medicine and chiropractic medicine.

    Any thoughts/suggestions/comments would be appreciated. Do you think I'll have it easier/tougher/about the same as other students? Do you think that having 7 years experience will help me or hurt me? Do you think that I will get it tougher during hospital rotations if people know that I'm a chiropractor?
    I think it's admirable that you would like to do more for your patients. You don't hear that very often anymore unfortunately. These days, too many people just want to do it just d/t the money issue. I hope they won't be harder on you if they know you are a DC. With your history and knowledge base, you will definetly be an asset to your patients.

    Anne, RNC
  6. by   Bicster
    I would contact the state board of nursing and your state board of chiro, and make sure that you dont have to retire your licence before becoming an RN/NP. There might be conflicts or something of that nature.
  7. by   cjcsoon2bnp
    Let me first start of by saying that wanting to do more for your patients is very admirable and its great that you want to expand your knowledge base and practice base by becoming a NP. I think that your previous experience and ability to interact with patients could give you a leg up when your in clinicals because of your experience with patients. The only thing that I think you need to watch out for is that you don't want your experience as a chiropractor to be seen as a bragging right to your peers and instructors so be careful when discussing your work as a chiropractor. I would also make sure that during clinicals you don't want anyone to think that your trying to medically advise a patient to seek a chiropractor for any particular condition or advertise your services as a chiropractor. I'm sure your aware of these things but just in case those are the biggest things to worry about. Good luck and let us know how its going!

    !Chris
  8. by   eyknough
    i think prior medical training is a double-edged sword in nursing school. even lpn's who are now joining us for their advanced lpn - rn classes find their nursing experience a hindrance some times.

    one point i remember is an lpn who got a question incorrect regarding cloudy outflow from peritoneal dialysis. she recalled from practice that nearly everyone on peritoneal dialysis has cloudy outflow. but according to the book, cloudy outflow is cause for great concern, warranting an immediate call to the doctor.

    there have been several instances where drawing from prior experience in the field can get you in trouble. just remember that you'll need to read the book to be sure you're answering questions 'correctly' on the tests and quizzes.

    go into nursing school with an open mind. our instructors seem pretty cool about students with prior experience, but we're often warned to answer questions on tests based on information from our books and not from experience (sadly).
  9. by   Piggvomit
    I dont hear this every day haha
  10. by   CoarsegoldTom
    My MD was a chiro first, although he doesn't practice as one now, so far as I know. I think his chiro training gave him a more "hands-on" and wholistic approach than most docs I've had. I'm very happy about that. He's just as likely to prescribe a book as a medication.

    Good luck in your endeavors!
  11. by   lumberjack
    I'd say you'll have a leg up in terms of anatomy/phys background and pt interaction. Adopting the nursing process will be differant, but totaly do-able. The only concern I'd have, echoing a previous post, is what you are "allowed" to do and under which lisence and when. For example, you can't practice (even using your chiro knowledge) as a chiro when in nursing clinicals. Just like as an EMT I can't do EMT things in clinicals if I am there as a nursing student. Once you get out and start practicing, just be clear on what you can and can't do and under which liscence you are practicing at any given moment. Kind of a shame that we have to do this song and dance, since I'm sure your experianace can only help in a practical sense, but I'd hate to invest the time and energy and money only to find out later that I couldn't practice the way I wanted. Just my two cents, ultimatly you'l find a way to practice the way you want one way or another.
  12. by   ZanatuBelmont
    Quote from chirodoc
    Well, I'm sure this will get flamed by some people, but I'm hoping for mostly positive/constructive feedback.

    I'm a practicing DC (Doctor of Chiropractic) who is applying to accelerated BSN/FNP programs. I'm not disillusioned with my profession, and I would say I'm very good at what I do. I have more than enough income to keep me happy so it's not about money. I just want to be able to do more for my patients. I found that more than half of the patients in my practice either hate their PCP, or don't even have one. Plus, I've been trying to get some kind of an affiliation with a hospital in the NYC area (my practice is in Park Slope, Brooklyn) so I think being an NP will help me. I plan on practicing both, family medicine and chiropractic medicine.

    Any thoughts/suggestions/comments would be appreciated. Do you think I'll have it easier/tougher/about the same as other students? Do you think that having 7 years experience will help me or hurt me? Do you think that I will get it tougher during hospital rotations if people know that I'm a chiropractor?
    I think removing yourself from the "doctor" role and into the "nurse" role will be your most difficult journey. Do I believe your years of medical school will help you out in nursing school? ABSOLUTELY! We study a variety of systems, complications, both medical treatment and nursing interventions. Your strongest area will obviously be those relating to neurology, which is one of the hardest - in my experience - sections to master in NS (Cardiac was a doozey, too).

    Good luck.
  13. by   aspire2b
    Hey Chirodoc,

    I'm also a practicing chiropractor and am considering going into nursing. How has your application process and experience been?
  14. by   Anoetos
    All I can say is that one of our A&P instructors is a DC and she's fabulous...

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