If You Had To Do It All Again Would You Go Straight For RN Instead?! - page 2

I'm doing some pre-reqs for nursing school right now and heard about a good LPN school close to where I live. I'm now contemplating becoming a LPN first and then doing my RN studies online. Just... Read More

  1. by   Audrey28
    Quote from Tracylvn
    If I had no kids. Did not have to worry about money. And no resposibilities I may have done it a different way and gone right for RN.
    But back to reality single mom of 3, need to work, have ton of resposibilities........Nope would not do it different.
    I'm a single mom- I'm hoping I can make it through all this- I still have a long ways to go- I just have one daughter- but I'm hoping to be an RN... I guess time will tell... I know i will need to work extremely hard- and I still work F/T- I have to only me to support us- I guess we will have to see....

    But I do know other women who have done it and I know I could too...
    ~audrey
  2. by   stilltrying
    I agree with Tracylvn if you don't have any resp. just keep going until you finish your RN, but if you have a family then you have to do like the rest of us and work and make some money to help provide for the family.
  3. by   belle3672
    I chose to go the LPN then bridge for my RN. First I really wanted to make sure nursing was for me, the LPN program was 1 year and then allowed me to realize nursing is for me. Second I have completed the PN program, passed those boards, worked for 2 years as an LPN, Bridge for my RN, finished and took my RN NCLEX today. All this in less time then if I had waited for my generic RN program start date, I live in Florida and the wait was 2-3 years! I do not regret doing it this way at all! I gave me a great foundation and 2 years to really discover that I do loving nursing! Good Luck!
  4. by   kcochrane
    No, I don't regret getting my LPN first. Back when I decided to go to nursing school, I wanted to get my RN first, but didn't have the time to be out of the job market. I'm glad I was forced to get my LPN first.

    If you have your prereqs done and a "C" average, you are pretty much given a slot to get into the RN program at my local CC. The wait for those without their LPN can be up to a year. Like another poster mentioned, check you RN programs to see if you are going to have a long wait to get in. Having my LPN really helped with A&P.

    I am not as scared of RN school as I was LPN school. I feel more confident about taking care of patents and have so much knowledge that I will take with me. I was able to learn to be a nurse as a LPN and not have to worry about being "in charge". And the amount of clinical you get as a LPN is wonderful.

    Good luck whatever you decide.
  5. by   nursval
    I think a common reason why future nurses go for LPN snd then RN is because of the wait to get straight into an RN program. I have only attended 2 different school in two different states, but both were extremely competitive. The RN program I did pre-reqs for in TN had 300 people trying to get into a program that accepted 60 and graduated 30, once a year. I just gained acceptance into a bridge program, and about 90% of the students in my class are fresh from or have not yet graduated from thre LPN program. If I knew I could get straight into an RN program, I probably would have gone that route simply because it would have been less hassle. But, on the other hand, I did lots of experience that I would not have gotten otherwise.
  6. by   amjowens
    It depends on your situation. For me, I'm not married and don't have kids, and am pretty driven toward my eventual goal of becoming a nurse practitioner. Also, I want to have an income that supports my lifestyle. So, I'm doing the step-by-step plan, earning my LPN this Dec., starting a regular RN program (NOT bridge) in Jan., and will directly continue on for my BSN, then my MSN. I'll be gaining nursing experience, so I can move right into my MSN, plus earning a nurse's salary all along, hoping to improve my level with each degree. A dream career plan for me that I'm happy about working toward!

    If your plan is to get to your nursing degree asap, then work fully without going on to school at the same time, I'd definitely go straight for the RN. I've met some pretty bitter LPNs. They appear stuck for whatever reasons, and I feel sorry for them since I see their point re the way they're sometimes treated.
  7. by   ncnurse99
    YES YES YES a thousand times yes!!! I would NEVER have went for LPN first. I am an LPN and have been for 9 yrs and have said from the day I graduated I was going straight back for my RN...well life happens! 9 years later I am finally starting my RN classes! I could kick myself for not doing it to start with!
  8. by   respect all nurses
    I would do the RN program instead. I'm a LPN, love my job and attended a really difficult school. My instructors/sch had very high standards equal to the local RN-Assoc. programs. Graduated well prepared, but now I'm seeking my RN r/t limited opportunities and lack of respect. Had I been in the position to attend a RN assoc. degree program, I would be working on my BSN instead.
  9. by   RNGrad2006
    Quote from ncnurse99
    YES YES YES a thousand times yes!!! I would NEVER have went for LPN first. I am an LPN and have been for 9 yrs and have said from the day I graduated I was going straight back for my RN...well life happens! 9 years later I am finally starting my RN classes! I could kick myself for not doing it to start with!
    You are still young so don't kick yourself. I started my LPN at age 37/38 and therefore was motivated to keep on going although my husband and kids feel like I have been in school for 6 years I did take about a year break after I got my RN to carry on with my BSN. I graduated in 2004 with my LPN, 2006 with my RN and will graduate with my BSN in 2009. I would like to go on for MSN but my husband has said NO WAY!!!! So will take a break and consider it when my kids are teens and want nothing to do with me. I heard from MANY LPN's that if you don't carry on with school right away it was hard to motivate yourself to go on. Your clinical experience will be an asset for sure but it is still very different in the RN role. Congrats for getting started...that is a big step and you will not regret it!!!
  10. by   Zanna
    My math instructor is no good at explaining demensional analysis! Are there any websites out there that will help me?
  11. by   RNGrad2006
    Quote from Zanna
    My math instructor is no good at explaining demensional analysis! Are there any websites out there that will help me?
    some people used it in nursing school but some of us found ratio and porportion easier to use and understand with less steps...as long as you do it the same way each time you should be fine...we had a dimensional textbook that seemed to explain the steps well...do you have a textbook that is helpful?
  12. by   DDRN4me
    I was an LPN for almost 18 yrs before I finally graduated (top 10 of my class) with my ADN in 2000. I learned sooo much and was able to handle myself in clinicals much better than my peers who had no previous experience (profs words not mine!!)
    I did stay in school and get my BSN..6 yrs later. All while working full time and raising a family.
    though it has been a long road i have been fortunate enough to have had great jobs with varied experience... invaluable, imho.
    would I change anything?? probably not. my girls watched me go to school and study hard and be successful. that in itself was worth it. Wish I could have afforded to work less and take more classes at once instead of one at a time. Best of luck whichever road you choose.
  13. by   respect all nurses
    Dear RN GRAD, thanks for your words of encouragement, they're greatly appreciated and needed. You are so right, age should not be a factor although family has continued to state " the older you become, the harder it is to concentrate/grasp the material etc." Respect all nurses.

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