Jump to content

lpn a nurse

International   (5,401 Views | 49 Replies)

1,325 Profile Views; 33 Posts

You are reading page 4 of lpn a nurse. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Multicollinearity has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Acute Care Psych, DNP Student.

3,119 Posts; 27,809 Profile Views

I think the original poster has received too much criticism. She asked about what CNAs are because she is in Canada, and they use different terms than we use in the United States.

Also, I am familiar with slightly different attitudes in Canada regarding LPNs compared to LPNs in the states. Indeed, I have heard Canadians question if LPNs are nurses. I haven't heard this question in the states. I'm not saying this is what I think - to be clear, I'm reporting what I have seen and heard from others.

I also have a relative who is a retired LPN in Canada. Her scope of practice was quite different than the typical scope of practice in the US. Part of that might have changed in recent years, as well. My LPN relative never attended any nursing school. She was hired by a nursing home and six weeks later (or something like that) they gave her a certificate as a "practical nurse."

My point is this: I think it is unfair to assume that the OP is clueless. I also think it is a mistake to assume that how it is in the United States applies everywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OgopogoLPN is a LPN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, LTC/Geriatric.

585 Posts; 9,814 Profile Views

I also have a relative who is a retired LPN in Canada. Her scope of practice was quite different than the typical scope of practice in the US. Part of that might have changed in recent years, as well. My LPN relative never attended any nursing school. She was hired by a nursing home and six weeks later (or something like that) they gave her a certificate as a "practical nurse."

.

I can heartily assure that that is no longer the case. In any province, at any time. At this point in time, in my province, to work in a nursing home, you either need to be a Registered Care Aid (or CNA in the USA, I think) an LPN, registered with the BC College of LPN's or an RN.

There are no "free" certifications without the education, testing and registration behind it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Multicollinearity has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Acute Care Psych, DNP Student.

3,119 Posts; 27,809 Profile Views

I can heartily assure that that is no longer the case. In any province, at any time. At this point in time, in my province, to work in a nursing home, you either need to be a Registered Care Aid (or CNA in the USA, I think) an LPN, registered with the BC College of LPN's or an RN.

There are no "free" certifications without the education, testing and registration behind it.

Yes. This education issue I referred to was years ago, in SK. What I meant about what might have changed was my relative's LPN scope back then vs. now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

33 Posts; 1,325 Profile Views

no offence taken,

if you take the time to read these responses ive gotten you can clearly see that some do consider lpn nurses and there are some who dont, i do and obuisly have the greatest respect for them , as i hope to be one, i know exactly what one is. my question was directed to rns asking how they felt about calling lpns nurses. not the job desription etc, although i appreatie any feedback.

this is a learning process, i am a student, please dont critize somone who is just asking a question.

im wondering why you would take the time to reply to a email you didnt know what it was about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

33 Posts; 1,325 Profile Views

thanks multi, thats exactly what i wanted to say.!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

33 Posts; 1,325 Profile Views

sda reread my question and the postings i have gotten,

mabye then you will see what i am talking about.

you have no idea how far ive gone to research this job,

what scares me is this site. i asked a simple question and feel like i got my head bitten off, i wont ask here again, unfourrtantly.

i just wanted some helpful feedback, not critism, not carreer advice, not job descriptions. and certinaly not ignorant comments from people.

you have no idea how hard ive worked to get to where i am, and no idea how hard im prepared to work in the futrre, i take none of this litley.

if sonone else has somthing rude to say, save it, i heard it, over and over, so dont keep posting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

33 Posts; 1,325 Profile Views

one more thing....

my point was that its two diffrent job descriptions...same title?

i know what lpNURSE stands for

where i come from lpn progrm is less than a year and rn would be 5.

4 but with a year of pre reqs.

lpn/nursing assistant is my progam title.

i just wanted feedback from the horses mouth not a progam director

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Multicollinearity has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Acute Care Psych, DNP Student.

3,119 Posts; 27,809 Profile Views

no offence taken,

if you take the time to read these responses ive gotten you can clearly see that some do consider lpn nurses and there are some who dont, i do and obuisly have the greatest respect for them , as i hope to be one, i know exactly what one is.

lpnstudent,

I'd just like to clarify what I meant. In the health profession, everyone knows that LPNs are nurses, both in Canada and the US. I was referring to a certain 'fuzziness' on the point with some non-nurse Canadians I've spoken with over the years.

I'm not sure if this is because of the large difference in LPN vs. RN education in Canada (one year vs. 4-5 years) or historical experience, like with my LPN relative. She was certified as a practical nurse, but she couldn't give any medication, etc. This is what I was referring to about historically a different scope of practice compared to today's LPNs in Canada and the States. I'm not sure if these factors contribute towards a bit of fuzziness on the issue or if my anecdotal experience is simply a coincidence.

Anyway...congratulations on starting your nursing program, and good luck to you!

:balloons:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

4 Followers; 29,019 Posts; 48,745 Profile Views

This whole thread is very confusing to me.

How about only Canadians participate to avoid some problems with semantics and ill feelings. Thanks. I'm moving to the Canadian forum now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

117 Posts; 3,057 Profile Views

There's no need to stop asking questions on this board. It's just that the way you worded the question was confusing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fiona59 has 18 years experience.

1 Follower; 8,305 Posts; 53,458 Profile Views

OK, I'm Canadian and joining this tea party.

LPNs are most definitely nurses. In my province we work in every area EXCEPT intensive care settings. Additional certifications are required to perform immunizations (in my province we are legally not allowed to immunize anyone under the age of five). Training and certification can be obtained in dialysis, ortho tech and OR tech skills.

Every job entails what are called nursing assistant duties. It's a fact of nursing.

I really think you need to go back to Sprott Shaw and ask for the programme brochure and see what is required of a Practical nurse and decide if it is what you want.

In my province, it's a four semester, two year course. The difference between an RN and a PN is the hows and why's of what nursing duties are performed. The scope of practice for PNs is constantly expanding. IV meds and starts have been added in my area.

Nursing and nursing education is changing. The government needs to get as effective a use of its healthcare$$ as it can. Hence the increased scope of pratice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

loriangel14 is a RN and specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

1 Follower; 6,923 Posts; 36,728 Profile Views

Thanks so much Fiona for reminding people how the PN education and role has changed. As a newly graduated Registered Practical Nurse in Ontario I feel frustrated when people assume that I took a "quick" one year course and function basically as an aide in LTC. I just landed my first job (in a hospital) and look forward to practicing within the ever growing scope of practice we have.

:nuke:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.