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Let RN license lapse to get out of "Old" new grad rut?

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1.5 years after graduation and I have not a single nursing job under my belt. What is a girl to do after spending all that money and time and work on an education?

I've come up with a plan? What do you think?

What if I allowed my RN license to lapse by not renewing it and I applied for work as a CNA/PCT in order to get into the hospital, get experience and make connections. Then after a year or so I could reinstate my license and hopefully get hired at the hospital where I was working as a CNA. Any thoughts on this wacky idea? What would a nurse manager think of hiring an RN who had let their license lapse to work as a CNA?

classicdame, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

I would be wary about hiring that person, unless there was full disclosure. You need to first check with BON to get their perspective. May not be as simple as you describe

I would check with your state BON. Letting your license lapse is a pretty extreme measure. Some states do not allow an easy reinstatement. They may require more education or have other hoops for your to jump through.i

And, think about it--if you are hired as a CNA and it comes out that you did, in fact, have an RN license which you allowed to lapse, you could be fired on the spot if you hadn't disclosed that information earlier. If there were ever any legal problems, you'd be hung out to dry because of your elevation to RN status. You'd be held to a higher standard because of your advanced knowledge. Letting your license lapse wouldn't look like a shrewd career move. It would instead suggest that you couldn't handle the responsibility. A plaintiff's attorney might imply that you "surrendered" your license rather than have it revoked.

Take a long hard look at this before you do something this drastic. I'm sorry you haven't been able to find a nursing job, but I've heard lots of hopeful things of late. Nurses are beginning to retire again after their 401K plans have recovered somewhat. Hospital hiring freezes are slowing lifting. Some people are cutting back to part time because a spouse has become employed again.

Hang in there. Look at taking an inexpensive refresher course at a community college if you feel your skills have gotten rusty. Volunteer at a facility you might consider for employment. There are many steps you can take before you do something as serious as allowing your license to lapse.

Let us know when you find a job, so we can rejoice with you.

KJM-RN, BSN

Has 2 years experience.

1.5 years after graduation and I have not a single nursing job under my belt. What is a girl to do after spending all that money and time and work on an education?

I've come up with a plan? What do you think?

What if I allowed my RN license to lapse by not renewing it and I applied for work as a CNA/PCT in order to get into the hospital, get experience and make connections. Then after a year or so I could reinstate my license and hopefully get hired at the hospital where I was working as a CNA. Any thoughts on this wacky idea? What would a nurse manager think of hiring an RN who had let their license lapse to work as a CNA?

Who's to say its going to be that simple to find a job as a CNA/PCT...? Maybe you need to put yourself out there more, fix up your résumé and cover letter, show up at HR, and volunteer at the hospital to make possible connections. Good luck!

1.5 years after graduation and I have not a single nursing job under my belt. What is a girl to do after spending all that money and time and work on an education?

I've come up with a plan? What do you think?

What if I allowed my RN license to lapse by not renewing it and I applied for work as a CNA/PCT in order to get into the hospital, get experience and make connections. Then after a year or so I could reinstate my license and hopefully get hired at the hospital where I was working as a CNA. Any thoughts on this wacky idea? What would a nurse manager think of hiring an RN who had let their license lapse to work as a CNA?

Don't do it!

It is no small thing to allow a RN license to lapse, or going inactive just because you cannot find employment as a new grad is like using a sledge hammer to swat a fly.

Then there is the fact you may *not* even be able to find CNA work, with or without your active RN license. Consider also just because you gave up or otherwise let your RN license lapse and something subsequently hits the fan you won't be held to the standard of a professional nurse. The ship has sailed in regards to that as far as you are concerned. You've been to and graduated from nursing school and passed the NCLEX, hence are a professional nurse if even only a new grad with no experience. You will not be able to claim ignorance of the standards regarding a professional nurse.

Know things are rough out there for new grads but you've got to keep keeping on; so brush up that resume, network, and otherwise hit the pavement. Tried old advice I know but sooner or later things will go your way.

DGTG

"wacky" wouldn't be the word I'd go for....."crazy" is more like it. "Stupid" comes to mind, too.

How are you any less an "old grad" by putting your license's status in jeopardy in this manner? You plan to just not mention it, and then spring it on a hiring manager at the right time? Really?

And this:

On the application for pct (since you're not a CNA, correct?) would you simply leave out the part under Education that you graduated from nursing school? Would you simply leave out your RN license info (in the section for licenses, certifications, etc)? If so, your intentionally incomplete application can be interpreted as fraudulent.

Dismissal would be your future, not an offer for a nursing job.

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi. Has 10 years experience.

This sounds like a horrible idea. If you let your license lapse, you can't just decide "oh I think I'll reinstate it now". And what do you think will happen... you'll start working as a PCT, your Nurse Manager will like you and you'll say "surprise, I'm actually an RN I just decided not to renew my license and trick you into hiring me as a PCT so you would then make me an RN" and s/he'll be happy about this? More likely you'd be fired from your PCT job and wouldn't have a prayer in the world of securing an RN job at that facility. People don't like liars.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

Not a solid plan.

PediLove2147, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatric Cardiology. Has 7 years experience.

I would rethink this.. there has to be something out there. Don't limit yourself to hospitals, just get experience working as an RN.

I know people who did something similar to this. I graduated at the downward slide to the low lows of the economy. I met people who graduated but purposely did not take their NCLEX for over a year ...have not kept in touch, but they did it so that they would appear fresh. One was a tech in a hospital and was way ahead (smart one there...) she did not want to lose her tech job and knew her hospital was not hiring it's own techs turned RN. So she stalled the whole engine so she could remain employed as a tech at least and not be force fired as a licensed RN. In the mean time she got tuition reimbursement to take other assorted classes she would use later if she chose to advance her degree, and again SMART GIRL she took classes outside of healthcare too to broaden her options if nursing turned out a flop. I'd bet she bailed from nursing too after all of this - SMART GIRL.

I dunno about letting already achieved license go. It might still show up. I know for my state I've seen some stuff show, not sure about nursing tho. Some things say "inactive" or "not renewed" so, you would still be shown in history...

Tait, MSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Cardiac, Education, Prof Practice. Has 14 years experience.

I spent five years keeping my license active in a state I had no intention of returning to any time soon. I would never let my liscence lapse. So in short, no I do not think it is a good idea.

You realize that you'll still have graduated in the same year.

Interview: "Why did you graduate 3 years ago but only now have your license?"

How on earth do you answer that without sounding like your judgment is lacking?

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

And just on the outside lucky chance that an RN position opportunity should unexpectedly become available, you would have to postpone or decline the job because you don't have the license for it.

Not a good idea and for all the other reasons that previous posters point out too.

I can't believe 1.5 years after graduating and still no job. Are you looking everywhere? Lower your standards, if that's what's keeping you unemployed. Don't give up yet. Honestly, if I were you, I'd keep my license current abd consider going back to school for something else before ever letting my license lapse and going for a CNA position!

joanna73, BSN, RN

Specializes in geriatrics.

If you allow your license to expire, most BON's have a policy in place which results in a refresher course and/or additional documentation. It usually isn't worth that route.

Furthermore, hiring managers will not be impressed and your job search becomes more challenging than it already is. For one thing, that indicates lack of accountability on your end.

Probably not a wise idea.

Not a great plan. I had to complete a refresher program because my ex would never let met work after I graduated and passed nclex then fast forward 14yrs later I'm a single mom with no license or work experience. The program was 3k and took 4 really intense months. If u let ur license expire you will need to take one to get it back. I am slugging a year out working SNF and moving to a smaller town where I m going to Get out of SN and get into acute care.

msteeleart

Specializes in Psych/med surg.

Have you tried something besides the hospitals? I gave up on getting into a hospital since in this town you have to know someone or you have to be working as a tech already in order to get into a hospital. I think it is a rude practice that is going on in hospitals right now with this "who you know" business. I worked as a float patient companion in a hospital for almost 2 years and couldn't get an RN job in a hospital. I thought for sure I would get in with hospital experience but people I graduated with that never even worked in a hospital are getting the RN jobs because they know someone they can hand their résumé to. I applied for an outreach RN job I found on indeed and I got it without knowing anyone inside the place. Who wants to work 12 hour night shifts at the hospital anyway? I will be working 8 to 5 mon-fri with paid holidays and paid mileage. No mandating me to work or staying extra shifts. So try looking outside the hospitals, you might find somewhere much better but I would stay away from nursing homes. I tried a nursing home and they gave me only 3 days of orientation and they expected me to be responsible for 20 to 40 people after that little orientation.

Expanding your search, revising your search methods and volunteering are probably your best bets. Especially in the time you have left before your license lapses.