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Kicked out of Nursing program

Hello,

I was wondering if anyone can help with this:

My daughter, who is an excellent student, had some difficulties with one of her classes and was not able to maintain the minimum C grade (got a C-) in this one class. Although, she completed 130 credit hrs and has a 3.4 gpa, she was booted from the nursing program in her senior year!

Furthermore, after some reseach, she finds out that this one "problem" class is not even a requirement in other nursing programs! She's tried other schools in the area and there's either a long waiting list (up to 3 yrs.) or they only offer RN to BSN. Other schools will on accept a portion of her credit hrs in transfer. It just seems rediculous!

Does anyone have a suggesion? Anyone been down this road?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Perpetual Student

Specializes in PACU.

Will they let her pick up where she left next quarter or next year? Other than that there's not really a whole lot for her to do other than try to transfer into another program.

Dolce, RN

Specializes in Day Surgery, Agency, Cath Lab, LTC/Psych.

Unfortunately almost all nursing schools have waiting lists. I know that it seems ridiculous but nursing school is becoming more and more competitive. I think her best option would be to see if she can get in next year where she left off. Contact her school to find out about options.

Quickbeam, BSN, RN

Specializes in Government.

She could retake the class if it is an option.

I know it seems unfair, but schools of nursing are entitled to make any program requirements they want above the minimum. I remember well chasing down an ethics class that would satisfy my school of nursing as a pre-req. Sending in course description after course description, only to get shot down over and over again. They finally had me do an independent study with a professor who had content they agreed with.

I'm sorry this is such a struggle for your daughter but nursing school curriculum is a whole lot more rigid than other courses of study. It might help for her to sit down with the dean and find out what her options are. As calmly as possible.

If she was booted from a nursing program, there had to be a reason and she should have been given documentation of that. The route that some students take is the appeal of dismissal from the nursing program. Universities have an appeal policy and I would encourage you to find it. Most of the time it is in the catalog, which should be available online. Look and see in the policy what reasons for an appeal would be and see if she fits any of the reasons. If she had any extenuating circumstances (illnesses, death in the family, financial hardship, etc...) providing documentation for consideration during the appeal process may help. Be sure that you know all of the policies for dismissal from the nurisng program, as knowledge of that is helpful and you won't be blindsided.

Another thing to consider is that colleges and universities require that a certain number of credit hours be completed at *that* school before a degree will be awarded (most places, it is the last 60 credit hours taken), so a transfer to a different program would likely not be in your daughter's best interest if it can be avoided. Her best option, if it is allowed in her program, would be to retake the class she got the C- in and continue in her current program. Most programs allow you to retake one class (however, if you don't pass it a second time, or fail to achieve the minimum grade in any other classes, you are usually out for good).

**All Heart RN**

Specializes in Cardiac.

I think her best option is to transfer. Here in Ohio, alot off BSN programs do not have waiting lists. I attend Wright State University's BSN program and admission is strictly based on GPA. The cutoff for GPA each admission period depends on the GPAs of the other prospective students for that period.

When I transferred to Wright State from Miami University (of Ohio, not Florida:)) mostly all of my credits from my other degree transferred.

So, as far as waiting lists and transfer credits, it all depends on the school. If she's coming from another BSN program, with a 3.4 GPA, I don't think she would have a problem transferring into Wright State's program (but I don't know where she is, geographically).

Good luck!

medsurgrnco, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Psych.

Are you sure there is not more going on? Getting booted out of a nursing program instead of needing to retake a class doesn't sound right. When I was in nursing school, there was a student retaking a class with us. As for other options, I suggest you look into on-line nursing degrees. Otherwise she may need to move to get into a program that does not have a waiting list and that takes most of her credits. Good luck!

SillyStudent, ASN, RN

Specializes in ER/ICU, CCL, EP.

Are you sure there is not more going on? Getting booted out of a nursing program instead of needing to retake a class doesn't sound right. When I was in nursing school, there was a student retaking a class with us. As for other options, I suggest you look into on-line nursing degrees. Otherwise she may need to move to get into a program that does not have a waiting list and that takes most of her credits. Good luck!

If she failed more than 2 classes in the program (below a C) there is a good chance she'd get booted. It's like that in a lot of schools.

TeresaB930, BSN, RN

Specializes in SNF.

Hmmm, there must be more to it than just failing one class. I haven't heard of a college or a nursing program that doesn't allow at least one opportunity to retake a class due to failing.

Hmmm, there must be more to it than just failing one class. I haven't heard of a college or a nursing program that doesn't allow at least one opportunity to retake a class due to failing.

There doesn't necessarily have to be any more to it than that. In the program I attended, if you failed a class (C or below), you were out of the program. Students who failed were allowed to apply for readmission the following year. If there was room in the class/clinical for them, they usually got in, but if there wasn't, they had to reapply until they got back in to another class. They were only allowed to repeat one class, if they failed again, or failed another class, there were no more chances, they would not be readmitted to the program.

if she is not allowed to retake a class it probably beneefit her to get into the bsn program if that is an option

she hhas put in time and money, look into every opition, don't let this go down the tube

Thanks everyone for your replies.

My daughter did re-take the class and still ended up with a C- in it. That's why she got kicked out. The policy is maintain a C avg. (her's was a 3.4) and nothing less than a C in any one class (that's the problem).

So, she spent four years of her life, oodles of money paid to the school, maintained a 3.4 gpa, and none of the classes are good for anything other than a nursing degree. She can't even change majors without practically starting over from scratch!

There is an appeal process in every school.

Every school has a system to retake a class. And every school has a process to reenter a program once they are formally dismissed from it.

Each nursing program structures their classes differently. The way they divide up the content of those classes is different. That is the reason this particular class does not show up in their curricula.

Example I took nutrition. I transferred to another school. Nutrition was not a required class. Nutrition was iincorporated in my other courses but did not show up as part of the course description. Nutrition is an essential part of any nursing program and you must have that knowledge to pass the Boards.

She needs to go to her academic adviser or a counselor at the school and find out what she has to do to repeat the class.

It is foolish to change schools over one class when that is all she has to complete.

She might have to reapply to the program to retake this particular class. If she follows the steps to reapply getting back in should be relatively quick and painless. She may have a waiting period, but it is usually less than 12 months certainly no more.

If this is the route she must go there will be hoops to jump through. She will need to do that.

By all means, find out the whole story of why she was asked to leave.

Go to the Dean, the Provost, the President, whoever you have to go to and get some answers.

And find out a way for her to complete that program.

Get her some remedial help so she can maintain the required average, too. Is she working too much? Caring for kids? Other responsibilities? Alleviate as many of them for her as you possibly can so she can get through school - if Nursing is what she really wants.

Could she become an LPN more easily? She could do that, work a while, then get her RN.

Best wishes.

Sounds like it's pretty clear why she was asked to leave -- she made less than a C in the class, re-took it per the school policy, and still made less than a C. No mystery there ...

I'm assuming that the school was clear about the "C-to-progress" policy from the get-go, right? (By the way, their policy, C average, no individual class below a C, only one retake, is very common in nursing programs -- that is the standard to which most nursing students are held.) Unless the student has some kind of impressive extenuating circumstances, I'm not sure the school is going to be too sympathetic.

I see she already retook the class. As I said there is a process to reenter the program. Follow it.

I have seen this at my school gals in exactly your daughters situation. They reentered the program twice. Some made it the third time some just were not meant to be nurses.

I know this is disappointing. Education is not wasted. If you believe that you are doing her a disservice.

I know a nurse who literally (not practically) started over from scratch 4 times. She finally graduated with a 3.4 and is one of the sharpest nurses I know. If your daughter wants this she can do it. It may not be in the way or time that you had planned or hoped for her. It may even take more $. but she will do it.

It is just a matter of what is important to her. Does she want the bad enough? Only time will answer that.

If she was booted from a nursing program, there had to be a reason and she should have been given documentation of that. The route that some students take is the appeal of dismissal from the nursing program. Universities have an appeal policy and I would encourage you to find it. Most of the time it is in the catalog, which should be available online. Look and see in the policy what reasons for an appeal would be and see if she fits any of the reasons. If she had any extenuating circumstances (illnesses, death in the family, financial hardship, etc...) providing documentation for consideration during the appeal process may help. Be sure that you know all of the policies for dismissal from the nurisng program, as knowledge of that is helpful and you won't be blindsided.

Look into what she said above.

This whole thing just doesn't sound right. I have seen people struggle with all of their classes and they just didn't get to pass that year. They came back the next. I would definitely check into this as she stated above.

Just a small observation here. I know you are concerned about your daughter, but it might be good for her to come here and speak for herself. This is a great website for encouragement and ideas. Maybe she's feeling kind of low right now, but eventually, she could really benefit from communicating first-hand and hearing the stories of others who have experienced similar difficulties and have triumphed over them.

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