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Just noticing nowdays the nurses in a lot of the homes

Nurses   (2,820 Views 13 Comments)
by Vtachy1 Vtachy1 (Member) Member

Vtachy1 has 25 years experience and specializes in BNAT instructor, ICU, Hospice,triage.

12,729 Profile Views; 446 Posts

Are calling the residents "Grandma". I'm so old and gray haired I remember we used to say sweetie or whateveh. But this is a trend? I guess its not as disrespectful??? Just noticed it.

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nursetiffany. specializes in LTC.

45 Posts; 2,626 Profile Views

we do not. i call them by there name. sometimes hun slips out but it all depends on the resident

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akanini has 10 years experience as a MSN, LPN, RN.

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Really??? I've never seen/heard that here in NY. Interesting!

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63 Posts; 2,418 Profile Views

Only one resident I know of at my facility, and we actually care-planned it. She responded much better when called Grandma.

Not a term to be used carelessly with anyone -- can definitely be seen as inappropriate/disrespectful, but there is a time/place where it can be used thoughtfully, and be the best way to address a particular resident.

The same is true for addressing some residents by first name. I don't do it as a general practice, but if experience shows this as a way to help a resident with dementia know that you are a friend then we definitely do so. Family is aware of and encourages the practice, and it is included on the resident's care plan.

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ziggysgal,RN has 7 years experience and specializes in MedSurg, Clinic, ER.

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I work as an aide in a hospital and one of the LVNs calls pretty much all of the older female patients grandma... at first, it was a little weird, but I've grown to ignore it. Personally, it seems like just another generic address... I mean, I think that it's better to call the patients by name, but I guess it's kind of like using sir or ma'am...

While I'm not comfortable with doing it myself, I don't see the harm in it. :uhoh3:

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Nikki0727 has 3 years experience.

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i worked as a aid in a LTC and there is this one older woman who is very cute..Very nice always tries to make you laugh..always laughs at your jokes no matter how dumb they are. We called her grandma because she was always trying to take care of us when really she was the one we were taking care of. I know in CNA class they tell us not to call residents hun and things like that but when you work with a certain person for a long period of time you have nick names for each other

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DizzyLizzyNurse has 12 years experience and specializes in Peds Medical Floor.

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We've had some people who are care planned to be called Grandma or Honey because they prefer it. And I've called some people grandma or mom if they think I'm their grandchild or daughter. Otherwise we call the residents by their first names.

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In some situations calling a woman Grandma is appropriate. For example, when working with a client with whom you have a special bond or relationship. Otherwise, calling clients by their last names (Mr., Ms., or Mrs. until directed otherwise) is the most respectful and dignified way to address the person to whom you are going to be providing personal care.

I think as nurses we often take for granted the power we have over others. For us, cleaning a bottom or performing invasive procedures may be commonplace, but it is not for our patients. So we must be extra aware that we are being as kind, caring, and respectful as possible. One way we can accomplish this is by ensuring modesty and speaking to our patients with dignity.

I know that if I were a frail and frightened old woman under the power of younger people who did not seem too concerned with my modesty and psychosocial needs I would refrain from correcting them out of fear of retaliation. We must always remember that our patients are patients because they are weak. And the strong must always protect the weak.

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237 Posts; 6,821 Profile Views

Are calling the residents "Grandma". I'm so old and gray haired I remember we used to say sweetie or whateveh. But this is a trend? I guess its not as disrespectful??? Just noticed it.

as long as the induividual getting called the name is ok and not offended by it, ive used grandma, grandpa and even one wants us to call him dude, if he likes it, im not going to go out of the way to call him mr smith or mr john, it hello dude, sounds unprofessional but it is what it is.

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3 Posts; 671 Profile Views

as long as the induividual getting called the name is ok and not offended by it, ive used grandma, grandpa and even one wants us to call him dude, if he likes it, im not going to go out of the way to call him mr smith or mr john, it hello dude, sounds unprofessional but it is what it is.

I agree as long as a person specifically asks to be called something other than their given name. Or in the case of the dementia patient who responds better to being called by a nickname.

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MrWarmHearted specializes in Emergency.

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yes this is an instance where what you learned in school may or may not translate into real practice. Personally, I don't call anyone grandma/pa however I know lots of very good nurses who provide the utmost dignified care to their patients who do.

On the other hand, there have been plenty of women patients who have called me "honey" but I just let it slide as i know they mean well;)

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