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Job searching while under investigation

Recovery   (1,368 Views | 23 Replies)

312 Profile Views; 49 Posts

I was suspended from my job last week and was told there would be an internal investigation. ( co-sign discrepancy)I’m trying to get a job ASAP. I’m so nervous the places I’m applying are going to reach out to my job and they’ll say things that will affect me getting the job. Has anyone ever been in this situation? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. TY

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everchangingRN has 20 years experience as a ASN, BSN, MSN and specializes in All.

37 Posts; 1,515 Profile Views

I am in this current situation too. I had already been looking and booked interviews when I was terminated and I am also terrified what they will say. So I will be following this thread. Used to be they could only release dates of employment. But now I have noticed on apps that you have to agree to let prospective employers inquire more than that. I did tell an interviewer the other day that my employer and I had parted ways. I didn't go any further. I didn't want to be dishonest. 

I am hoping others can guide us...

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

4 Followers; 1,778 Posts; 3,737 Profile Views

There used to be the myth that a former employer could only give date ranges of employment or could be sued. An employer can say anything as long as it is factual, ie-"nurse Susie was terminated for suspected diversion", or whatever the case. Nursing is a small world as well, as many have found out. If asked, I would be as close to honest as possible

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

4 Followers; 1,778 Posts; 3,737 Profile Views

18 minutes ago, AbbeyR said:

@Hoosier_RN is it better to resign vs be terminated? 

Yes, but give notice. If they terminate at that point, you can say you did the right thing and gave notice, they chose to end at that time

Edited by Hoosier_RN

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ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing.

4 Followers; 2,761 Posts; 11,365 Profile Views

3 hours ago, AbbeyR said:

@Hoosier_RN is it better to resign vs be terminated? 

You may be reported to your BON as "resigned in lieu of termination" but resigning with the caveat that you will be considered rehireable is the most optimum situation of all....

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9 Posts; 1,096 Profile Views

Whatever happened to innocent until proven guilty?  I swear if I knew the kind of back biting and slithering tongues that were in nursing, I never would have went into this field.  All the time, we are supposed to be a team, this is not even true.  It's every man for himself and CYA at all times esp. against all your coworkers!

 

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

5,322 Posts; 46,403 Profile Views

Just FYI to add - I usually believed that a resignation was considered 'voluntary'. And that could exclude you from collecting unemployment benefits.

A termination could be contested (as in wrongful termination) and you could still be considered eligible for unemployment benefits.

Now things may have changed over the years.

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49 Posts; 312 Profile Views

Thanks for the feedback! I’m just trying to get a nursing job YESTERDAY. I interviewed with Davita(I’ve read they’re accepting with license restrictions) I do not have anything on my license now, but if this issue with my employer goes further I want to have a secured job. Prayers and good vibes appreciated!  

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RN1970 specializes in ortho, peds, med/surg, cardiac.

5 Posts; 32 Profile Views

From what I understand, they cannot say anything negative other than they would not rehire you.

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nursex23 has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN.

106 Posts; 1,445 Profile Views

On 1/31/2020 at 7:14 AM, AbbeyR said:

is it better to resign vs be terminated? 

Resign. And in my personal experience, I would email your resignation to your boss after letting them know in person that you plan to resign that way there is proof that you resigned and gave a proper 2 weeks. I didn't do that with one of my jobs and I highly suspect that they put me in as terminated. 

Also can't you put that you don't want your current employer to be contacted. I've told several jobs to please not contact my current employer because I would rather they didn't know I was looking. If they insist, find a supervisor that could speak highly of your character. 

Good luck! 

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

5,322 Posts; 46,403 Profile Views

23 hours ago, RN1970 said:

From what I understand, they cannot say anything negative other than they would not rehire you.

Not really true. If they said you were terminated for poor attendance and excessive tardiness, all they would have to do is produce payroll time card or machine data. Or if there were 4 significant med error reports in a 2 month period, there would be documentation on file.

True and easily proven info. That is negative data for a prospective employer. The OLD employer just has to be true and able to prove it!!!

More often than not, it's just easier just to decline info and declare "not eligible for rehire".

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