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Is this a hostile work environment?

Nurses   (670 Views | 12 Replies)
by PlS82 PlS82, RN (New) New Nurse

PlS82 is a RN and specializes in Registered Nurse.

108 Profile Views; 4 Posts

Retaliation after reporting violation:

A. immediately  reassigned against my request to a unit that exacerbate my anxiety. X2 panic attacks. and my regular schedule. 

 B. Few weeks later false accusation made   failure to report abuse on a shift I did not work.  DNS refuses to verify, tells me these are very accusatory.. tells me it's closed

C. investigation by the doh started... Then after,  facility denying that they have any statements only paraphrased statements by the DNS. Says I was only asked to assist and my statement never provided to Investigation. 

D. Gave notice of violation to corporate. I received degrading emails from another Corporate person denying my retro (request prior to all this). These emails were forwarded to corp compliance a day after I sent notice of violations. Never heard back from compliance.  Only further harassment from HR corporate. 

E. I was not allowed to report to my shifts until I met with corporate (which with a witness), was only to offer me retropay if I stopped asking about the false statements. 

F. Shift due back corporate emails me hour before informs me that my assignment will not be changed and my concerns are unacceptable. * This would put me sharing a assignment with the false accusers.

** had to involuntarily resign, effective immediately.

 would you feel safe to work? Do you think as a nurse you could continue in this environment???
I have charges open with EEOC and state now. 

Would you continue? Is this hostile work environment? Discredits, degrading, and this being top superiors of the company. 

Edited by PlS82

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Hani is a BSN, RN, EMT-I and specializes in NICU, L&D, Public Health.

25 Posts; 139 Profile Views

Wait, you were suspended for 30 days? I'm having a hard time parsing your post, you're probably upset so I get it, but I can't understand what happened at all.

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7 Followers; 3,456 Posts; 24,464 Profile Views

I'm sorry but I could not even begin to understand what you are saying happened. Can you try again with full sentences?

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PlS82 is a RN and specializes in Registered Nurse.

4 Posts; 108 Profile Views

Fixed it. I apologize. I think the format affected it. Thank you

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1,155 Posts; 7,849 Profile Views

This post does not make sense.  

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PlS82 is a RN and specializes in Registered Nurse.

4 Posts; 108 Profile Views

It was the format. I apologize.  It has been edited

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Hani is a BSN, RN, EMT-I and specializes in NICU, L&D, Public Health.

25 Posts; 139 Profile Views

I'll be honest. I read the updated, edited version and I still can't put it all together. I'm sorry OP.

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3 Followers; 37,203 Posts; 99,006 Profile Views

From what I got from your post, it seems you have been treated like many who make complaints. Just what exactly were you expecting? Move on down the road. Fight it from afar or learn from this and dig in on the task of getting a new job. Those upcoming interviews are not going to be pleasant.

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4 Posts; 24 Profile Views

Sounds like a terrible situation! I would have gotten out of that situation as well. I hope you are okay

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288 Posts; 71,672 Profile Views

That's the dark side of nursing for you.

Live, learn, and get into a better position elsewhere.

Side note:

Whistleblowers tend not to last long.

In the future, if you are going to report a violation, and you are not a favorite of your employer, be prepared to vamoose. 

Don't believe the farce of reporting being a learning opportunity - it should be, but, in reality, you will be putting a target on your back. Report when necessary (i.e. witnessing a narcotic diversion, obvious patient abuse), and still be prepared to vamoose. 

Unfortunately, even those with legit reasons to report will have a target on their backs.

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HomeBound has 20 years experience and specializes in ED, ICU, Prehospital.

1 Follower; 246 Posts; 1,386 Profile Views

2 hours ago, DTWriter said:

That's the dark side of nursing for you.

Live, learn, and get into a better position elsewhere.

Side note:

Whistleblowers tend not to last long.

In the future, if you are going to report a violation, and you are not a favorite of your employer, be prepared to vamoose. 

Don't believe the farce of reporting being a learning opportunity - it should be, but, in reality, you will be putting a target on your back. Report when necessary (i.e. witnessing a narcotic diversion, obvious patient abuse), and still be prepared to vamoose. 

Unfortunately, even those with legit reasons to report will have a target on their backs.

What DT said.

I'm going thru a class right now about "mindfulness" and some other types of "energy dynamics"---and honestly? If I hear one more time about how "being more passive" and "not being direct and confrontational" is the best way to deal with horrible situations....

Most people are conflict avoidant--you don't know the reason they are the way they are---until you come into direct conflict with them.

What I'm trying to say is that your manager, your corporate people, whomever---don't want waves. In any way, shape, or form. This isn't just nursing. This is the world we live in now---hyper correct and critical of anything out of the "established norm".

Corporate functions for one reason. Profits. Period. As soon as you internalize this, you will understand the "why" and the "how could they" of what they have done to you and about you. Did you make them look bad in any way? Are you costing them money--as in--you want special accommodations for something (going out of their way for you means that they may have to do that for others and then.....OMG!!! we might have to spend money on making the workplace a decent place to be--and we won't even discuss what those things...I mean patients....need or want)

Your manager may have seen what you did or did not do as making them look bad as well. I don't know your demeanor when you reported what you did--I am still very unclear as to what actually happened.

If your report or your discussion takes on what this "edited post" did? I would not be surprised if your presentation alone pi$$ed them off. Not trying to be harsh---but more than one very literate and intelligent person here cannot distinguish from your "editing" ---the situation.

Be clear and concise. If you don't want to name names...don't. But be clear in what you are trying to communicate.

If you have anxiety issues---my advice is to seek help for them. Panic attacks are not something that nurses can have as a rule while caring for vulnerable people (patients). It is what it is---and unless you are willing to go to a physician and start treatment in some way for anxiety---the ADA does NOT cover you. That company has NO obligation to "accommodate" your requests.

As for the "accusers". What accusers? What did they accuse you of doing or not doing? Did you blow the whistle on the accusers or did you blow the whistle on a situation of abuse you witnessed?

Answer these questions clearly and concisely and you may have a chance at getting some good advice here.

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2 Followers; 754 Posts; 4,447 Profile Views

Document everything! I hope you sent those emails to yourself at an outside email address because otherwise they'll claim to never have received them, even if they did. I would move on because even if you get your job back through EEOC it will still be hostile and you'll never feel comfortable there. Learn from this experience and go find greener pastures.

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