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Is this a Bad Evaluation?

Posted

Specializes in Med/Surg. Has 1 years experience.

Hi, I'm a new nurse (10 months in) and I had my first evaluation today and honestly don't know what to think of it as I have nothing to compare it to. In competency I scored a 20/25. Overall I scored an 82/100 using a numbered rating scale. That doesn't seem very good to me. In the comments section it stated that over the past year I've shown continuing improvement and am building confidence and a solid nursing foundation. It also stated that it was a pleasure to have me working on (my unit). The unit manager filled this stuff out but then had one of the charge nurses have me sign the paperwork. So there was no opportunity for me to ask why I scored a certain number and where I need to improve specifically. There were no negative statements whatsoever in the evaluation. I also got a 50 cent raise, which is good. So, to you more experienced nurses, is this a good, bad or so-so evalution? Thank you in advance for your time.

JB2007, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, Med-SURG,STICU. Has 5 years experience.

I think it is a good eval. You are showing improvement and growing as a nurse. That is good for a nurse only 10 month out of nursing school. If you have questions about any areas that may or may not need improvement I would call my NM and request a meeting with him/her. Keep up the good work!

I don't think they could have given you a perfect eval as a newly minted nurse. You got the raise so that makes it a good eval. You now have a baseline and should see improvement in your future scores. Congrats on surviving!

I think it was very good. You are a keeper! And you will continue to improve.

tyvin, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice / Psych / RNAC.

OMG! Ya know it could have been worse; you could've scored in the 70's so be glad. Your score indicates you're not perfect but above average. :up:

itsmejuli

Specializes in Home Care.

Anytime you get a raise its a good eval :)

brownbook

Has 35 years experience.

Hi, I just posted this on another evaluation question.

I was a supervisor for a few years. The first evaluation I wrote my supervisor wanted to review before I gave it to the employee. I evaluated him highly. My supervisor told me I couldn't evaluate him so highly. "How can he show improvement on the next evaluation if you give him such high marks on this one!" So I had to lower all the numbers.

Absolutely ridiculous!!! Like answering all the questions correctly on a test but the teacher has to give you a B otherwise you can't improve on the next test!!!!!

Do not take evaluations to seriously. Yours was as good as it gets!!!!!!

Nascar nurse, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC & Hospice. Has 34 years experience.

Hi, I just posted this on another evaluation question.

I was a supervisor for a few years. The first evaluation I wrote my supervisor wanted to review before I gave it to the employee. I evaluated him highly. My supervisor told me I couldn't evaluate him so highly. "How can he show improvement on the next evaluation if you give him such high marks on this one!" So I had to lower all the numbers.

Absolutely ridiculous!!! Like answering all the questions correctly on a test but the teacher has to give you a B otherwise you can't improve on the next test!!!!!

Do not take evaluations to seriously. Yours was as good as it gets!!!!!!

Unfortunately I have to agree with brownbook. As a manager, my corporation has strongly stated that we are only allowed to give approx 5% of our people a fantastic evaluation. Their thinking is..most of the population is just "average" therefore most staff members should only be given average evaluations. We score multiple areas on a 1-5 basis (one = very bad & 5 = fantastic). We are to score most areas on everyone as a 3. (I think ultimately this allows them to justify the horrible raises we all get). I find this very insulting to the employee as we are fortunate to have a great group of nurses/aides. I also find this insulting to us, the managers, because if all of our employees are only average then ultimately we are doing something very wrong.

This is the same company that sends out annual employee satisfaction surveys and annual customer service surveys. Oddly enough they are very unhappy we they receive 3's on THEIR evaluations!

Don't take your evaluations to seriously, especially when all written comments are positive. You are on the right track.

Moogie

Specializes in Gerontology, nursing education.

Hi, I just posted this on another evaluation question.

I was a supervisor for a few years. The first evaluation I wrote my supervisor wanted to review before I gave it to the employee. I evaluated him highly. My supervisor told me I couldn't evaluate him so highly. "How can he show improvement on the next evaluation if you give him such high marks on this one!" So I had to lower all the numbers.

Absolutely ridiculous!!! Like answering all the questions correctly on a test but the teacher has to give you a B otherwise you can't improve on the next test!!!!!

Do not take evaluations to seriously. Yours was as good as it gets!!!!!!

i have heard this about other facilities as well. It seems to me to be a poor way to try to motivate employees. If you know you won't be rewarded for trying to achieve excellence in practice and you get your annual raise regardless of whether you "improved" or not, it seems that this would be a disincentive to try to work harder.

I wish I could give you a dozen kudos, brownbook! You are absolutely right.

dudette10, MSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Academics. Has 9 years experience.

Don't take your evaluations to seriously, especially when all written comments are positive. You are on the right track.

Exactly. The numbers are what determines pay; the words are more reflective of your performance.

The fear of "too many good evals" is a corporate phenomenon, regardless of the industry. I've heard my husband and his work friends complain of the same issues on evals. Glowing narratives with "average" numeric ratings and no raise or ridiculously low raises that don't even keep up with inflation. He works in IT for a large corporation.

It's all about the money.

belgarion

Specializes in Med Surg.

Hi, I just posted this on another evaluation question.

I was a supervisor for a few years. The first evaluation I wrote my supervisor wanted to review before I gave it to the employee. I evaluated him highly. My supervisor told me I couldn't evaluate him so highly. "How can he show improvement on the next evaluation if you give him such high marks on this one!" So I had to lower all the numbers.

Absolutely ridiculous!!! Like answering all the questions correctly on a test but the teacher has to give you a B otherwise you can't improve on the next test!!!!!

Do not take evaluations to seriously. Yours was as good as it gets!!!!!!

Ran into the same thing in the "real world" as a manager. Praise an employee all you wanted but give them an "average" on the official eval. The theory was all employees should be treated equally and giving one employee a better evaluation than the others meant you were "elevating" that person's status. When I asked why bother with evaluations if that was the case I was told because they were a way to prevent discrimination suits. In other words, you couldn't give a bad eval either.

And people ask me why I have no desire to jump back into the shark pool.

merlee

Has 36 years experience.

Be happy - - you deserved a raise, and got one. You are improving and growing.

Congrats!

NurseCard, ADN

Specializes in Med/Surge, Psych, LTC, Home Health. Has 13 years experience.

I just have to agree with everyone else; I think you got a very good eval and you should be proud. Hold your head high. And enjoy the 50 cent raise; it's a pretty good one. =) My last raise was a whopping 16 cents, and I've been a nurse 7 years (I've moved around a lot though =)).

RaziRN

Specializes in Med/Surg. Has 1 years experience.

Thank you everyone for the advice, encouragement and insight into the management side of things. Very thought-provoking. I knew I wouldn't get a perfect eval (who among is perfect?) and I'm glad I didn't get berated on time management. I've definitely improved on time management but there's room for more improvement for sure. I'm just too hard on myself in all aspects of life. Thank you again for clearing that up for me; I was very confused as to why the numbers were so-so but the written part full of praise and then actually getting a good raise. (Ha, I rhyme!) :)

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 43 years experience.

You also need to think of it this way: if you get scores in the 90's, what scores would be left to give those nurses who have been there for more than 5 years? What scores would be left to give those nurses who are leaders among the staff ... the charge nurses, preceptors, and those clinical experts who everyone else goes to as advice? They need to "leave some room at the top" for the real experts.

Evaluations are much like other scoring systems: they need to be designed so that the experienced experts who are "superstars" can get a higher score than the beginner -- even if that beginner is doing a great job "for a beginner." You can't expect to be one of the best nurses on the unit with only 10 months of experience -- and you need to expect that the scoring system will reserve the top scores for the truly top performers.

My hospital clarified its scoring system a few years ago in the following way -- and it has helped. These guidelines are printed on the form so that everyone can see what the numbers mean. They score on a system of 1-7 points for each item.

Scores of 1, 2, or 3 indicate some problem in the area and need to be accompanied by an action plan to correct the deficiency. Few of those scores are given.

Scores of 4 or 5 are the scores most commonly given. These are the scores used to rate the typical competent performers. They are considered "just fine" but provide 2 levels to show two different levels of performance.

Scores of 6 or 7 are for star performers. To get a 6 or 7 on a criteria, there needs to be documentation that the person is a leader in that aspect of practice. For example, it would be for contributing to the development of a policy rather than just following the policy ... or teaching others rather than just practicing correctly ... etc.

Most people are happy to get their scores of 4 or 5 and get the positive eval placed in their file for another year. Some people go the extra mile and get a couple of 6's or 7's, but understand they need to go above and beyond the correct performance of their job duties to deserve that higher score.

This is the same company that sends out annual employee satisfaction surveys and annual customer service surveys. Oddly enough they are very unhappy we they receive 3's on THEIR evaluations!

Wow, I've never thought of it that way, and am SOOOOO going to have to point that out the next time we get a Press-Gainey scores lecture. :devil:

It seems to me to be a poor way to try to motivate employees. If you know you won't be rewarded for trying to achieve excellence in practice and you get your annual raise regardless of whether you "improved" or not, it seems that this would be a disincentive to try to work harder.

It absolutely is. I remember the year that I took on new responsibilities and improved on everything that needed improvement on my previous year's eval. Guess what I got? THE EXACT SAME EVAL SCORES and EXACT SAME RAISE. How hard do you think I worked the year after that? :cool:

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

i think the numbered scales are pretty arbitrary. our hospital scores on a 1-5 scale, and as preceptors we're told that our orientees' first evaluation should be straight 3's. if they're less than 3, they can't get off orientation but no one is supposed to get higher than a 3 unless they've been consistently doing good stuff for a year. that lets out everyone who's getting an end of year evaluation, too.

pay attention to the comments that are written on your evaluation -- this is a better indicator of how you're doing. if someone thought about it enough to write in a comment about it, you can bet that you stand out. (either in a good way or a bad way, depending upon the nature of the comment.) if you get a copy of your evaluation, pay special attention to the areas where you didn't get a comment -- that may be an area where you need to improve.

but you got your raise and got only good comments -- that sounds like a great evaluation to me!