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Increase in bad student behavior.

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Keepstanding has 10 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in School Nursing.

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MrNurse(x2) has 28 years experience as a ADN and specializes in IMC, school nursing.

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2 minutes ago, AdobeRN said:

I have never looked into it but I wonder what the "evidence based" practice is regarding the "rewards".  I see some of our behavior kids starting to get out of control next thing I see is the same kid outside tossing a football back and forth with the principal or a CORE team member - are they acting out because they need more stimulation, more energy spent???  So strange to me - since I see the tossing a football back and forth as a "reward".  

 

Welcome to progressive psychiatry. My foster kid attempted to kill my son and another student at school, his inpatient therapy only cared about his feelings, not his actions or consequences. Their take was he needs to feel good about himself. I have little to no faith.

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JenTheSchoolRN is a BSN, RN and specializes in School nursing.

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On 10/23/2019 at 2:11 PM, Flare said:

 

There are times that I purposely have them wait for a moment while i finish charting.  Learning how to wait is a teachable skill 😉

I do this all the time now. I've never get through charting if I needed.

Also please and thank you are some of the most important words you can learn. But why do I have to keep reminding MS and HS children to use them?

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On 10/24/2019 at 9:21 AM, AdobeRN said:

Wouldn't surprise me if mom turned around and said "wow, he never acts like this at home"  we tend to get this statement alot when these types of behaviors happen at school.  

 

In my experience when you hear that from parents is often because the children at home don't have a lot of boundaries and expectations set for them in their home environments. If that's the case the school environment see those behaviors because in school their is more structure and there are rules to follow.

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It boils down to fast services--now, now, now---mentality. They have poor or lack of patience. They dislike waiting because everything is almost instantaneously conveniently provided to them. I understand children though, not adults. Adults cater for them. This should be for cops, doctors, nurses, other healthcare professionals, and other professions to have a privilege to be served first. We should get in and out fast, but we don't exercise it or complain about being delayed. We suck it up. We wait then bam our break is over. Oh boy I wish I rule the world. They are going to be sorry because they gonna have to wait for me.🤣

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I've seen it even in Nursing School. We had students who would yell at the professors when they disagreed with the instructor.

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On 10/23/2019 at 2:11 PM, Flare said:

the instant gratification kills me!  especially the constant sense of immediacy in my office.  It blows my mind how the students will come in and announce that they need help for their (mostly) minor issues.  It doesn't matter to them if i'm on a phone call, have EMS in there, am giving a med, or whatnot.  They expect to be addressed and tended to immediately upon entering.  Then when it's an ailment that I can't really do anything about, you can see the look of befuddlement.  

I do ❤️ the stare-downs I get when I am on the phone and a student walks in. I give them a quick look (no bleeding, unlabored breathing, no bone deformities = you can wait). But they stare until I hang up. 

My son was getting assaulted by a bully at school (Verified HIB incident). The school wants to “work with him.”  We finally had enough and called the police. I think the school is still surprised we did that. 

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subee has 45 years experience as a MSN, CRNA.

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When there are too many rats in a cage, they get restless and mean.  We are no different.  We are rats with keys and life us becoming progressively harder and kids still learn how to cope from their parents...not to mention when there is an addict in the house. 

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lifelearningrn has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in School Nursing.

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On ‎10‎/‎24‎/‎2019 at 9:21 AM, AdobeRN said:

Wouldn't surprise me if mom turned around and said "wow, he never acts like this at home"  we tend to get this statement alot when these types of behaviors happen at school.  

 

And it's usually a lie. We've had several parents over the years claim that it must be us because the child is an angel at home. Not once has this been the case.  These are truly troubled kids, they don't turn it on and off. 

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On 10/23/2019 at 1:11 PM, Flare said:

the instant gratification kills me!  especially the constant sense of immediacy in my office.  It blows my mind how the students will come in and announce that they need help for their (mostly) minor issues.  It doesn't matter to them if i'm on a phone call, have EMS in there, am giving a med, or whatnot.  They expect to be addressed and tended to immediately upon entering.  Then when it's an ailment that I can't really do anything about, you can see the look of befuddlement.  If they think it's bad to have to wait 3 minutes for me to finish tending to the student before them, they'll never make it trying to wait in a pediatrician office.  

There are times that I purposely have them wait for a moment while i finish charting.  Learning how to wait is a teachable skill 😉

This right here!!! And truthfully, so many of the adults in the building are just as bad so how can we expect more from the kids?

I am just so tired of the fact that all of the parents (and their kids) have time and money to play on $1200 cell phones. But then can't buy a bottle of Advil and a thermometer to treat their kids for minor ailments before sending them to school. 

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On 10/24/2019 at 9:00 AM, MrNurse(x2) said:

I am in a very small private, 97 students this year. We had gone 4 years without a fight. We have had three this year. There have been violent acts in the past 4 years, but a lot have been perpetuated by girls and our school will NOT discipline girls. The politics of private schools requires discipline be on a financial sliding scale, which rarely is just. Children are being showered with things and experiences but are disconnected from their selfish parents and this is the outcome.

All media outlets have grown rich by disrespecting law enforcement, they are only mimicking what they see.

I am pro law enforcement when it is done properly, without disrespect for the people against whom law is enforced, which is not always the case.

As for unruly kids - our society has kicked God out of our schools and pretty much outlawed physical discipline, even when it is done reasonably and lovingly.  That is, when a child needs correction, a calm adult should be talking to the child, explaining why the child is being corrected and how he/she has erred.  Then there should be either a spanking or some sort of restriction - stand or sit in the corner (like Dennis the Menace),  or some other restriction so the child can think about the matter.

There should not be beatings, yelling, cursing, or similar behavior on the part of the adult.

I am dismayed that so many folks here don't seem to realize the origin of the problem (atheistic, ungodly upbringing of so many of today's parents and their kids - who are your students). 

It wouldn't hurt to bring in law enforcement for kids who are injured by their peers.  Their peers need to be corrected and soon.  Their parents, too.

We can't just keep wringing our hands and letting this violence go.  It is a disservice to victims and to perpetrators.  Yes, some of the children might be undiagnosed mentally ill.  Most are likely just getting lousy parenting and lousy treatment by school administrators.

On 10/29/2019 at 3:49 PM, lifelearningrn said:

And it's usually a lie. We've had several parents over the years claim that it must be us because the child is an angel at home. Not once has this been the case.  These are truly troubled kids, they don't turn it on and off. 

How do you know this?  Not saying you are wrong, just wondering how you know.

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On 10/26/2019 at 3:31 PM, stockmanjr said:

I've seen it even in Nursing School. We had students who would yell at the professors when they disagreed with the instructor.

What was the outcome in these cases?

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On 10/24/2019 at 10:16 AM, ihavealltheice said:

Being in this situation with my own child who has a classmate who is disruptive and can be violent at times, I know a lot of parents have complained and other than suspensions, nothing is done.

What have you tried beyond complaining to the school officials?  how about the TV newspeople?  Senators and other elected officials?  You can do it anonymously if needed.

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