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I'm transferring with less than a year until I graduate.... Am I crazy?!

Posted

Okay so long story short, I started las June in a 2 yr. ADN program. The program had some accreditations (SAC) and way okay per my BON to sit for boards. Well I just found out they are no long looking to receive CCNE or ACEN accreditation, just maintain SAC. I have 9 mo's until I graduate-- but I can't stay there for fear of my sanity. I'm getting bullied, we're not being taught material we should be learning, and I cry every day I'm there.

I've been talking to a rep at a different school in my city about their school's BSN program. I went there for a meeting and loved the school. I have an AA so all of my gen-ed classes will transfer, but none of my nursing courses will (because of the school's accreditation issues). I will be starting in October at this new school.

I would be graduating in July 2015 if I stayed at my current school and got my ADN...

But I would be graduating in Dec. 2016 with a BSN if I go through with transferring... (And it would be from a school that has all accreditations.)

Im not crazy right? Transferring doesn't make you a quitter does it? So long as you finish?

what do you guys think???

Edited by eyesopen_mouthshut
Wording

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

DO what is best for you....no you are not a quitter.....((HUGS))

Think about what you want and make a decision. Follow that inner voice. If its going to a different school that has a BSN, go for it. Make sure that they accept your classes and units are transferable. Maybe there will be some kind of application stuff you have to do to transfer? Good luck in your journey and NO you are not a quitter. I'd question the accreditation as well.

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

I think you're smart to look elsewhere. Accreditation is important when it comes time for licensure and job searching. Some jobs look at accreditation when they screen applicants. It's worth sacrificing one year to get both your bachelor's AND a degree from an accredited school, if you can do this.

Quitter? NO. You need to do what's best for YOU.

mrsboots87

Specializes in Neuro, Telemetry. Has 6 years experience.

Accreditation is uber important if you want to further your education passed the ADN level. And due to the nursing glut and facilities moving toward mostly to all BSN educated nursed, it would be silly to stop and ADN. So basically, no, you are not crazy to transfer. It sucks that this pushes back graduation, but it sounds like you will be entering a better program with the proper accreditation AND you will be getting your BSN. Were you to graduate with your ADN, then apply for an complete an RN-BSN program after, it would put you in the same time-frame anyway. This sounds like a good choice as long as you are comfortable with the school and the additional time until graduation. And another plus, you should ace the first 2 blocks of the new program since you have already completed them elsewhere. GL

Why don't you just finish your adn and pass your boards first? As long as you are allowed to sit for your boards, that's what's most important. Then go through with an RNtoBSN degree from an accredited University. There are many schools that will take you in if you just have an unencumbered license. A good one that comes to mind is western governs rn to bsn. Accreditation is not the end-all-be-all. It's purely voluntary for a school to be accredited by ccne or acen.

I think you're making an excellent decision. One extra year for a BSN over an ADN? It sounds like an easy decision to me. Good luck to you!

SopranoKris, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 6 years experience.

Actual nursing courses rarely, if ever, transfer from one institution to another.

Due to the accreditation issue, I think you're making the right decision. Also, you'll have a BSN instead of an ADN when you're done. It only sets you back a little over a year. No biggie, in the scheme of things. Plus, it sounds like you need a reprieve from what you've been going through.

Good luck!!! :)

mrsboots87

Specializes in Neuro, Telemetry. Has 6 years experience.

Why don't you just finish your adn and pass your boards first? As long as you are allowed to sit for your boards, that's what's most important. Then go through with an RNtoBSN degree from an accredited University. There are many schools that will take you in if you just have an unencumbered license. A good one that comes to mind is western governs rn to bsn. Accreditation is not the end-all-be-all. It's purely voluntary for a school to be accredited by ccne or acen.

It it may be not be required, but it is still pretty important. Most reputable universities will not accept transfer credit from and unaccredited program/school. Also, what if the OP layers wants to get her MSN or doctorates. By graduated from a school that's not accredited now, op will have a much harder time furthering her education later. Accreditation is pretty darn important and speaks numbers about the quality of the program due to standards set to achieve accreditation.

It it may be not be required, but it is still pretty important. Most reputable universities will not accept transfer credit from and unaccredited program/school. Also, what if the OP layers wants to get her MSN or doctorates. By graduated from a school that's not accredited now, op will have a much harder time furthering her education later. Accreditation is pretty darn important and speaks numbers about the quality of the program due to standards set to achieve accreditation.

I hope you know that there are nurses that got their nursing degrees from schools that no longer exist (for example, graduated a long time ago) and thusly, fall into the same category of those who graduated from an unaccredited nursing program. Many of them went on to get their BSNs with no issue and even became APRNs.

Rather than risk applying for a BSN and starting ALL OVER AGAIN due to unsuccessful clinical credits transferred, as well as taking the risk of not being accepted... complete the program they are in now, pass their boards.... And get their BSN from a bridge program that is accredited after. You will end up with a BSN from an accredited institution - solves the accreditation worry completely! There are tons of rn to bsn bridge programs to choose from that will want you as a student if you just have an RN license!!

My opinion is that i don't think it's worth the risks. That is not to say accreditation is not important... but it really should be the least of your concern, as the most important part is you passing the nclex and earning your license. Doors will open after. But more power to you if you can get into that bsn program, and having all your credits transfer and continuing where you left off

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

I would be graduating in July 2015 if I stayed at my current school and got my ADN...
I know that my advice goes against the general grain, but I would personally stay put and graduate next year with the ADN degree. However, I strongly suspect you've already decided you're going to attempt to transfer to the BSN degree program and were simply looking for others to validate your decision.

I wish you the best of luck with whatever you decide.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

Many hospitals will not hire someone who did not graduate from an accredited nursing school.

Many hospitals will not hire someone who did not graduate from an accredited nursing school.

Hospitals will not hire for thousands, if not millions of reasons.

Did i miss something that requires further clarification? The idea, again, is that the OP finishes their current ADN, and then pursue a BSN from an accredited institution after via rn to bsn bridge (6months-1 year programs available). Minus the risk of changing schools and wasting time.

I hope you know that there are nurses that got their nursing degrees from schools that no longer exist (for example, graduated a long time ago) and thusly, fall into the same category of those who graduated from an unaccredited nursing program. Many of them went on to get their BSNs with no issue and even became APRNs.

Rather than risk applying for a BSN and starting ALL OVER AGAIN due to unsuccessful clinical credits transferred, as well as taking the risk of not being accepted... complete the program they are in now, pass their boards.... And get their BSN from a bridge program that is accredited after. You will end up with a BSN from an accredited institution - solves the accreditation worry completely! There are tons of rn to bsn bridge programs to choose from that will want you as a student if you just have an RN license!!

My opinion is that i don't think it's worth the risks. That is not to say accreditation is not important... but it really should be the least of your concern, as the most important part is you passing the nclex and earning your license. Doors will open after. But more power to you if you can get into that bsn program, and having all your credits transfer and continuing where you left off

The problem is this: I DO want to get my MSN as an FNP. My dream school is the school I'm transferring to anyway, and they won't take me after i complete the ADN r/t the accreditation issues. I live in an area where there are about 5-6 good nursing programs but all require a 2+ year wait list with no guarantee that you'll be accepted... Except for the BSN programs. But none of them will take transfer credits from my current school so after I graduate with my ADN I won't be able to get my BSN unless I go to a school like University of Phoenix or WGU (not that there's anything wrong with them, I just don't want to continue my education online).

Also, after calling around some of the hospitals and other places I'd like to work in the future, I've been told by HR and hiring managers that yes they used to take RNs from my program that had graduated, but they do not any longer because the school is not accredited.

Last thing.... I'm in quarter 5 of 8.... Have yet to do clinicals at a hospital (and there are 15 within a 20 mile radius) because the hospitals won't let our students come there to do clinicals. I'm in maternity now and have yet to even talk to an even postpartum woman. All assessments are done on computer or mannequin. Is that normal?

matthewandrew, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Family & Palliative Nursing. Has 7 years experience.

Go to the BSN program.

----------------------

UCLA FNP Class of 2016

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

But none of them will take transfer credits from my current school so after I graduate with my ADN I won't be able to get my BSN unless I go to a school like University of Phoenix or WGU (not that there's anything wrong with them, I just don't want to continue my education online).
There are many, many other schools that will accept you into their RN-to-BSN degree completion programs, even if your associate degree was conferred by an unaccredited program. And as far as online schooling, the BSN degree that you earn will not indicate you completed an online program. There are many campus-based programs with good reputations that will accept you for admission.

https://allnurses.com/online-nursing-schools/i-completed-non-912463.html

BlueRidgeModonda, BSN

Specializes in L&D, RNC-OB, now Circulating in the Main OR. Has 7 years experience.

Last thing.... I'm in quarter 5 of 8.... Have yet to do clinicals at a hospital (and there are 15 within a 20 mile radius) because the hospitals won't let our students come there to do clinicals. I'm in maternity now and have yet to even talk to an even postpartum woman. All assessments are done on computer or mannequin. Is that normal?

I don't think it's normal at all. During my first semester (of five), after passing basic competences we were on the floor; doing basic assessments, passing meds (under supervision), attending to ADL's. We built on our skills checklist in class and lab, applied them bedside with supervision until we were deemed competent and grew a little more each time in our "scope". I would have pulled my hair out only doing skills with plastic people.