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knnyz

knnyz

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knnyz's Latest Activity

  1. knnyz

    Are Nursing Programs harder to get into?

    Some people will agree that getting accepted into a nursing program is the easiest part of your nursing career!
  2. knnyz

    NLN PAX PN EXAM Need Help

    Buy the review book specifically for the NLN. It was written by them and it's a red book. Or get any book with lots of practice tests. Take a sample test, but pretend like it's a real test. Time yourself, and stop when the time is up. Then find out what you did wrong and why and correct it. Rinse and repeat.
  3. knnyz

    Future of nurse practitioners

    Can't imagine msn and np programs going anywhere anytime soon. They are too vital to primary care at the moment, and you can see that with more and more states giving NPs independence and autonomy. If anything, my guess is it depends on the degree of saturation in the country whether msns will be phased out or not.
  4. knnyz

    Pre-Nursing PreReq Questions

    Focus on one step at a time. But plan for the future. Prereqs like anatomy and physiology 1 and 2 is core, take them ASAP. and do well in them. I don't think a refresher course is necessary, because alot of it is brute memorization. Although it does help if you understand basic chemistry. Get rid of as many prereqs as you can in one semester. It shouldn't take more than two semesters to complete prereqs usually. A RN license is the same license whether you get an associates or bachelors. Accreditation is another topic on its own but there are articles here about that.
  5. For all those that are prenursing now, What are your plans if you aren't accepted to a nursing program? Just thinking realistically of all the possibilities that may happen, such as doing poorly on the entrance exam, not enough seats available for you, grades weren't competitive, or what have you... For me, I haven't given much thought on it until recently, as I had my heart set to starting clinicals for Fall 2014. Had my career and education future completely planned out for at least a decade, based on fact that I got into the nursing program. I didn't think I need to worry because I feel like I've worked very hard on my prereqs, and achieved a 4.0 GPA. BUT I know that's not the smartest thing to do, as ANYTHING can happen. So now, after some thought, I will find a fulltime job (not working now) just in case this doesn't pan out. And then reapply next semesters, and to other schools and LVN programs. Just as a realistic plan B. Of course, I would be extremely devastated if not accepted, but planning all this out will lead to less disappointment and a less hurt. What's everyone else's backup plan(s)? Or better yet, how would you cope with disappointment??
  6. Spectacular article! At the moment I think I'm most interested, of all of the ones listed, in WGU for my future RN-to-BSN program. From my research, they seem too good to be true almost; cheap tuition, ability to complete RN-BSN within ONE term (6 months), completely online, generous with transfer credits, nonprofit, accredited, lots of support from the school, and more. I heard the catch is that your GPA will only be a 3.0, because it's based on pass/fail policy in terms of credits - but it seems to matter very little as I've read that plenty from WGU get into many prestigious graduate programs (CRNA for example) regardless of GPA.
  7. knnyz

    Can RN students work as a CNA?

    Anyone know what are the rules to work as a CNA here in NY? Heard that if you pass a fundamentals of nursing course, you can sit through a CNA program, or simply just work as one. Don't really have all the interest, money, or time to take an 8-week course if I'm not learning anything new! Or is there no other way to go through the 8-week course? Hope someone can shed some light on this subject, thank you. Would be such a HUGE help to get some experience working in the field before graduating!
  8. knnyz

    Online Adult Practitioner Program New York

    Am super interested in this as well
  9. Getting my ADN now, have a goal of becoming a nurse practitioner or CRNA. It's still very early to decide but at the moment - leaning towards FNP! Don't really have an interest being a floor nurse for the long term.
  10. knnyz

    cheapest rn to bsn bridge program?

    WGU sounds like a bargain! And it seems like a fast (and rigorous) program, just what I'm looking for. Did anyone who graduated from WGU, or other online programs, go for their MSN? And did they have any trouble getting accepted to MSN programs because their bsn was "online"? In particular, Family Nurse practitioner and/or CRNA programs. Definitely not stopping after getting BSN, but a big concern for me is that after getting the BSN online would that hinder my goal of getting FNP or CRNA degrees?
  11. knnyz

    BA in Non-Nursing Field -->BSN or MSN after ADN?

    Always thought about this but never seen anyone actually take this route. I am in the same situation, got a BA and doing ADN now. Very likely I'll be accepted to clinicals at this time (4.0 on all prereqs so far). *cross fingers* Basically, it depends on the MSN program. A big factor is your GRE score. If you scored well, you're a shoo-in for most MSN programs. If not, the RN-BSN route is pretty fast and simple when done online. The RN-BSN bridge usually 12 months, and can even be faster/cheaper since you have many liberal arts credits that can be transferred. Someone correct me if I'm wrong though
  12. Hey guys - so I was hearing from several colleagues that if you already acquired a bachelors (BA, not BS - does it matter?), and complete an associates RN program, you can go straight to a masters program in nursing. Does anyone know about this route? It would be great to just go straight for a masters (nurse practitioner, CNS, etc) after getting my RN license! It's not a big deal but would save soooo much time from taking a bridge program to get my BSN and then MSN. Thank you in advance :)
  13. Associates is really actually three years in general. It's never 2 like they say. Might as well just go long and get bachelors first.
  14. knnyz

    Getting a CNA job while in nursing school

    Yeah I would emphasis your clinical experience that you have in school, and keep the customer service experience to a minimum. The clinical experience should be the bulk of your resume, if you don't have other work-related experience. Grades for the clinicals are also good to show on your resume (if they're worth showing that is). Customer service/retail is important, but how will that help with tending to patients? It's not generally what the employer will first look for. A killer cover letter that emphasizes your clinical experience will make a huge difference as well! Good luck
  15. Agreed with everyone above. You can pursue ADN if you want to work a little bit sooner. Then do RN-BSN program online while working, and oftentimes, your employer will help you out funding your BSN. You can also achieve your masters online too. Focus on prereqs, especially your core sciences. Most programs are highly competitive, so make sure you outshine your competitors. Be resourceful and efficient with studying. If you don't understand a concept, youtube it or look online for a better explanation. Mnemonics is also helpful with classes like A&P where you have to memorize a lot. The nursing department will look at your GPA and your pre-entrance exam grade for admission into clinicals. There is no passing grade, but is based on how you did compared to everyone else. At least that's how my school did it. Good luck!
  16. knnyz

    Anatomy Classes

    A&P is a core for all health-related majors so it's not surprising that it's filling up. But you should be able to get in, just stay on top of your registration time to the exact millisecond. Even if it does get full, people that drop that class all the time...