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I want to be a nurse but is nursing really that horrible??

Hello fellow nurses. I really want to become a licensed practical nurse. I could start this fall or sooner for a lpn class at a vocational school. I'm kinda scared. Im pretty good at school, 3.0 gpa so the tests wouldn't be my problem maybe just the clinicals. My boyfriend who is a certified nursing assistant said to become a lpn. He said it really isn't that bad. He said all they pretty much did at the nursing home he worked for was pass meds, paperwork, and IVS. I know there will be more than that. I am a very sweet person and I love helping people. Blood and guts wont kill me, im just scared about giving IVs because what if I do it wrong. i just really want to know If nursing is really all that horrible as people say! Please fellow nurses help me out. I figure I could at least try as an lpn and if I absoutely hate it, I could change my career. Please help!

Nursing is wonderful but a very demanding career. Lpn school is not easy but a good way to enter nursing. Why not become a CNA to see for yourself if nursing is for you.

interleukin

Specializes in Mixed Level-1 ICU.

Nursing is wonderful but a very demanding career. Lpn school is not easy but a good way to enter nursing. Why not become a CNA to see for yourself if nursing is for you.

Do you really think someone not trained as an RN can realize/appreciate what an RN's demands and responsibilities truly are?

I am a nursing student and I am worried about that too.

A few days ago I went to a nursing seminar at my school and they were pretty informative. The best piece of advice they had given was that "if a person has no humility, they cannot be a nurse."

Maybe it has to do with how humble you can be when working with people in sorry states. An LPN there mentioned that it is like if a patient vomits on you, you can't get mad. That humility advice is going to stay with me...I hope it helps!

Like AlexK49 said, it won't hurt to become a CNA. I am going to take a CNA class to get an idea of what it is like to work in that kind of environment.

xos4eva

Specializes in Pediatrics, Med-Surg.

Nursing is hard and it's stressful but if you love what you do you can make it. There are various positions in nursing such as school nurses, camp nurses, nursing homes and various departments within a hospital. It's all about finding your niche, it may not be your first position but if this is your passion you will find your spot. You will have days where you feel drained and you hate it but it doesn't tarnish how you feel about the profession overall.

Thornbird

Specializes in A little of this & a little of that.

It really depends upon the person and how they view things. Some people can make anything seem awful. There are employers who treat nurses badly. There are rude patients. A nurse does have to deal with blood and other body fluids. There can be nasty dressings to change. But it's not just constant disgusting horrible tasks.

Becoming a CNA first is a good way to find out if you generally like patient care and won't get grossed out too easily. I have no clue what interleukin is talking about as there is no discussion here about the demands of being an RN.

LPN's are entry level nurses. Everything you do is practiced in clinical with supervision. IV management is covered in detail. Starting IV's (putting it in the vein) is not a basic skill for LPN's. In the places that even allow LPN's to do that, it is taught separately at a later time.

i think that your bf has a very limited idea on what an nurse [lpn/rn] does during the course of a shift..maybe this is all he sees but while that nurse is passing meds she is observing the patient, checking v/s to determine to give or to hold certain meds, whether they look like their blood sugar is up/down, the manner of breathing etc . the list goes on..

but all these things will be what you will be going to school to learn, nursing school is hard because you are not only acquiring knowledge but you must learn skills at the same time

if you want to be an lpn and you have a good school it is an excellent way to enter the nursing profession

if you have a choice and can financially manage it you might consider going to an RN program...the doors that will be open and the paycheck will be much more

good luck

mondkmondk

Specializes in Geriatrics.

I started as a CNA and worked my way up...CNA, CMT, LPN, and now RN. The first semester of LPN school for me anyways, was like a CNA review class. The second semester dealt with actual LPN duties like being in charge etc. I was on the Dean's honor roll in LPN school and for me, it was pretty easy.

Now, RN school was something different entirely; I literally had to study my butt off. It took me 3 tries to pass boards. I basically decided to be an RN because I work in LTC, and basically the LPN's can do most everything the RN's can (except for IV pushes etc.) without RN pay.

My job can be stressful of course, most any job could at least sometime...but at the end of my shift, I feel good about myself inside, knowing I helped people who really needed it.

Good luck to you!

Blessings, Michelle

MS._Jen_RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Orthosurgery, Rehab, Homecare.

There are negative people in every career and life in general. Don't let those people cast the whole field in a bad light.

~Jen

1styearsucks

Specializes in med-surg.

Do NOT let anyone discourage you or intimidate you. Make your decision based on your goals and life experiences. I have seen that website. I hope none of those nurses ever care for me or a family member of mine.:nurse:

cherrybreeze, ADN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg.

There are nurses out there that shouldn't be nurses. We all work with them. There are days that the best nurses, who love nursing, don't like their jobs. There are bad managers, bad coworkers. That goes with ANY profession, though! To insinuate that any nurse who speaks of their career highly is just still disillusioned...I can't get my head around that. Yes, some of the things we do as nurses aren't pretty. We handle body fluids, whatever. I try to think of THOSE things as, if it were ME, or my mother, or someone else I loved, how would I want them to be cared for? Someone has to do it, and if I can do the job and give that person respect and care for them with dignity, then I have done them a tremendous service. There ARE the days that I leave my job and don't ever want to go back....and then, I have a little time to relax, and I get my head back in the game. It's the little things, a thank you card, a hug, a smile, that remind me why I do what I do. Last weekend, I took care of a gentleman for 3 days in a row. Both he and his wife were very nice (he'd been a patient a couple times before, he's had multiple small bowel obstructions). On the third day, his wife brought me in a couple of homemade muffins. :D That small gesture meant a lot to me, it made my day. Just muffins.

There will always be the patients that treat you like crap, manipulate you, that you can never please, no matter how hard you try. Healthcare is going to always be about money, and that's going to make giving good patient care more and more difficult. But, to counter that, there will be the patients that will always be grateful to you for the care you gave to them. It's usually the little things that go the farthest. A heartfelt smile. Honest empathy. Their KNOWING that you honestly care for their well-being.

NeoNurseTX, RN

Specializes in NICU Level III.

There are ups and downs as with any job.

Even in nursing school, you don't really get a good idea of what being the 'real nurse' is like though.

suanna

Specializes in Post Anesthesia.

My personal opinion is -yes it is most always really that horrible, but I'm only one voice. By all means explore the options for nursing as a career, but I would advise you to see if there are any "pre-nursing" programs in your area that would arrange for you to shadow a nurse for a shift or two before you waste a lot of $$$ getting a licence to do a job you will hate. Who knows you may be one of the few that take to the current trends in health care like a duck to water, but check it out first.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

What I really don't understand is why if your work environment is so bad and you acknowledge that there are nurses who enjoy a good place to work that you don't make a change? Not directed to you in particular but the excuses I've heard in the past don't really make sense to me. Things such as geography and the need for a certain level of income are all adjustable, imo. Not easily or immediately perhaps but very few people are truly stuck imo. My take on all this is that life is way too short and way too hard to spend so much time and energy working at something you don't love.

Healthcare in general is a place where you need to be able to get knocked down and keep on going. If you can't handle all the frustration then you might just die young from stress. I enjoy facing problems that I am responsible for fixing. I have clinicals around some people like that and frankly I don't even like being around them.

Butterfliesnroses

Specializes in LTC.

If you cleaned the mess I commend you! If not then I don't obviously! I'm an aide. And I think very highly of nurses that clean up messes they find. I think very highly of a nurse that will get a resident ice water. I think highly of a nurse that will offer her help if she can (which I ususally say no thanks to but still). I think highly of a nurse that teamwork is on her list. I will go the extra mile for these nurses. I will jump when they say jump. I respect them because they respect me. However the nurses that come and tell me there is spilled coffee in the lobby and I need to go clean it up. Or that they spilled Jevity in someones room and it needs to be cleaned (this actually happened!). Or that search for me for 15 minutes, see I'm in my elbows in poop and inform me I need to get Mrs. so and so ice water stat. Or that talk to me like I'm there slave, I'm below them. Do I jump when they say jump? Depends. Hmmm you want the vitals....I'll get to them when I can. I just don't have TIME today. So and so fell I'll be right there...Depends on the severity and if it will harm the resident. But I generally am not so willing to go the extra mile. I will make time to do the nurse that is respectfuls vitals even if it does put me so behind I have to stay 30 minutes over. But for the nurse that isn't so respectful if I don't have time I don't have time. And yes I understand that you can do my job but I can't do most of your job. I GET that. BUT treat your aides, housekeepers, ect with respect and they will go the extra mile which in turn will make your job easier! For the record I'm going to be starting the nursing program in 2009 (fall) so I'll walk a mile in your shoes and maybe I'll see things differently. But one of my main goals is to always remeber where I came from and to treat those people with the utmost respect. Cause without them the nurses would be lost! Just like without nurses us aides would be lost. We need each other....Sorry for the longness of the post. If you read all this you get a piece of :BDCk:.

cherrybreeze, ADN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg.

If you cleaned the mess I commend you! If not then I don't obviously! I'm an aide. And I think very highly of nurses that clean up messes they find. I think very highly of a nurse that will get a resident ice water. I think highly of a nurse that will offer her help if she can (which I ususally say no thanks to but still). I think highly of a nurse that teamwork is on her list. I will go the extra mile for these nurses. I will jump when they say jump. I respect them because they respect me. However the nurses that come and tell me there is spilled coffee in the lobby and I need to go clean it up. Or that they spilled Jevity in someones room and it needs to be cleaned (this actually happened!). Or that search for me for 15 minutes, see I'm in my elbows in poop and inform me I need to get Mrs. so and so ice water stat. Or that talk to me like I'm there slave, I'm below them. Do I jump when they say jump? Depends. Hmmm you want the vitals....I'll get to them when I can. I just don't have TIME today. So and so fell I'll be right there...Depends on the severity and if it will harm the resident. But I generally am not so willing to go the extra mile. I will make time to do the nurse that is respectfuls vitals even if it does put me so behind I have to stay 30 minutes over. But for the nurse that isn't so respectful if I don't have time I don't have time. And yes I understand that you can do my job but I can't do most of your job. I GET that. BUT treat your aides, housekeepers, ect with respect and they will go the extra mile which in turn will make your job easier! For the record I'm going to be starting the nursing program in 2009 (fall) so I'll walk a mile in your shoes and maybe I'll see things differently. But one of my main goals is to always remeber where I came from and to treat those people with the utmost respect. Cause without them the nurses would be lost! Just like without nurses us aides would be lost. We need each other....Sorry for the longness of the post. If you read all this you get a piece of :BDCk:.

Teamwork is key. I would never ask my CNA to do something I can do that I have the time to do. If I am in the middle of 3 different things that only I can do, then yes, I may ask them to, but you can bet I'm apologizing and explaining to them exactly why I'm asking and NOT doing it myself (and they're usually saying, "that's OK, Bree, that's my job!"). I never think it's ok to "expect" someone to do ANYthing. I can be walking to the kitchen with someone's water pitcher past an aide and hear, "I can get that." I usually say, "that's ok, so can I!" If I'm in a room passing meds, why can't I also fill their water pitcher, empty their urinal, etc? On the flip side, I did crab at a CNA one night because I was in a patient room one afternoon, and he was not doing well. I was trying to assess him so I could call the doc, and she took his VS and left, I found her at the desk. His cup of water was nasty (from sitting there all day), urinal was full...in that particular case, I had a lot on my plate in that room, so she SHOULD have taken care of those things while she as in there.

I think my philosophy comes from being a CNA for five years before I became an RN. I've been on both sides. I like coming to work and hearing, "I'm glad to be working with you today," "it's always nice to work with you, you're great to be on a team with," etc.

Really, they are similar to a lot of experiences I've had as a nurse.

Nursing is a rough career, and I do sometimes hate it. But I love it, too. It's hard to explain, and this probably isn't helping you a bit, lol.

However hard it's been and will continue to be, I must say that I am proud, humble, and glad to be a nurse.

geekgolightly, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, neuro, orthotrauma.

I knew nursing was not going to be easy. But after looking long and hard at all of the available careers out there; both requiring an education and those who require no education, nursing seemed the best bet. It was three and a half years of school for me to get my RN. Some take four years, some a little less, and with that, you have a job with a living wage in any multitude of fields of medicine. Some days you can even make a difference in someones life.

If not for nursing, I would be stuck in an office making no real difference in my own life or anyone elses. I did that for five years before getting into nursing school. Every day I watched the clock tick backwards, bored out of my skull and wanting to escape. I definitely don't feel that way in nursing!

Virgo_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac Telemetry, ED.

Nursing is far from glamorous, and I will be the first to admit that I have a love/hate relationship with my job. If not for the pay, I would not do it. I earn every single penny.

Yes, nursing can be grueling, soul crushing work. But, this is a second career for me, and I can honestly say that any job can be soul crushing if you let it be.

That being said, I think if you truly despise your job, then change is definitely in order. There are aspects of my job that I absolutely hate, and I am considering changes to lessen those aspects, such as moving to night shift, or trying another area of nursing.

As I've said to others, there is BS in every job. It's not a matter of getting away from the BS, it's a matter of figuring out which brand of BS you're able to tolerate.

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