Jump to content
Plain Vanilla

Plain Vanilla

Member Member
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 29

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 1,024

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

Plain Vanilla's Latest Activity

  1. Plain Vanilla

    What do graduate nurses know about Psychiatric Nursing?

    This seems to be the case with my buddy. She started out in med surg and is now working in psych and loves it more than she did med surg.
  2. Plain Vanilla

    What do graduate nurses know about Psychiatric Nursing?

    I'm so glad I found your post! I'm a relatively new nurse thinking about working in a psych unit. What is your day to day routine like, if there is such a thing? Compared to other areas like med surg, are there less meds (this is what I've only heard)?
  3. Plain Vanilla

    RN relocating to NYC

    Thanks for the reply! Did you start out in acute care? That seems to be the situation with some of my friends currently working in NYC. First it took most of them at least a year to find a job in an acute care setting. They have been in the same specialty and I have not heard of advancements for them yet, but we've all been nurses for only a couple of years. Is the job situation the same out in Long Island? It would be ideal for me to work there, but I have more connections in NYC and figured I'd try my luck there first if I move back.
  4. Plain Vanilla

    RN relocating to NYC

    Hello all, I'm an RN that has about a year of experience in LTC and am looking to move back home to NYC. I'm currently enrolled in an RN-BSN program. I'm aware of the tough job market there, however I don't doubt I'll get something in LTC or subacute. I'm just wondering if I were to move back and worked in LTC or subacute, would a transition to an acute setting be possible? I know it can be done in other cities, but I am not sure about a competitive place such as NYC. I guess I'm just looking to hear success stories of others in NYC who have worked in LTC and moved on to acute care or ended up working in med surg. Thanks!
  5. Plain Vanilla

    New Grad that took time off for baby

    I took a year off doing other stuff after I graduated nursing school and passing the NCLEX and managed to find a job right away (not a hospital). I was up front with the interviewer and told them why I took off (family obligations, work related) so I really think it depends on the employer. My suggestion to you if you have only been applying to hospitals (and others who may not have found work in many months) would be to look outside of hospitals for work. Try LTC, doctor's offices, urgent care facilities, home care, methadone clinics, jails etc. These jobs can become your stepping stones to better things. It could also be the area that you live in (ex a large city or town with nursing programs), even if you have tried to apply to all kinds of positions it could be saturated with competing new grads. I've had to relocate for the job I have now and I don't regret it because even though it is not hospital work, I am getting a lot of experience with treatments and documenting, and the pay is competitive for the area to boot.
  6. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    I have been thinking about it some more and I figure that when it comes down to the human biology and physiology classes, they will all be somewhat severe regardless of the professor. The one trend I did notice for the human biology was this: follow the slides in lecture. And if you can, read the chapter you need before the lecture.When you all get the book, you'll see that it is extremely large and the chapters are going to be very long and detailed. Despite that, get whatever you can out of the chapter. The lecture is typically an hour or hour and a half long and I didn't have a very long attention span. Whenever I read the chapter beforehand, I was able to fully pay attention in lecture and understand everything the professor talked about in class. However there were times where I didn't make time to read a chapter before the lecture. By the time I was in that lecture, I spent the time fidgeting, worrying about why I didn't make time to read the chapter because all the information being given sounded like gobbledygook, and then my mind would wander to worry about my other classes and what I would have for lunch later. Even though the chapters are really long and I noticed a lot of people liked to study the summarized chapter reviews that are provided by the professor on blackboard, read the chapters more than once if you can. Often times I reread a chapter because I noticed that I would pick up more information from the first time around. I had to skim a lot of time from my hobbies to do this, but it was worth it. Another thing to keep in mind is to check quiz and midterm/final scantron answers after they are graded to make sure nothing is marked wrong. More than once I found errors on some of my quizzes and two errors on one of my midterms. I was able to notice they were graded incorrectly because of some obscure passage I read in the book (which is why I ended up rereading chapters). If I thought I got an answer right that was marked wrong, I waited after class to show the professor and they were usually kind enough to change the grade. At first the professor might suggest that the answer is graded correctly, but if you show them the supporting reason from the book they usually change it. (Although I did have one experience where a professor was unwilling to change an answer marked as wrong because the question was from a practice quiz on the slide...and in which case goes back to following the slides). Initially I thought that LaGuardia's nursing programs were a bit unfair for demanding near perfect GPAs for admission, but in hindsight it is a pretty good thing because you're bound to really know your stuff if you get in.
  7. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    Hey all, I have not checked this website in some time and I just wanted to say that I need to check it more often! I will PM you guys my email.
  8. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    Hey Honest, I'm sorry I did not get back to you earlier. I was very caught up with midterms and now finals. I don't have the fall schedules, but you are able to register online by logging into CUNY portal at www.cuny.edu and then going to eSIMS after logging in. Actually, you can check the fall schedule here: http://web.laguardia.edu/schedules/ I am not sure if it will transfer, but it probably will. I do recall someone telling me today that she took Human Biology I many years ago and got a C, but had the opportunity to retake it here. She also said that because she got a good grade in Human Biology II, she wasn't required to retake it (she is also an LPN major who is in the program now). That is very true; we could end up in the same classes or even program. In that case, just look for a lady who always wears a white cotton scarf with green, yellow and red embroidery! I am thinking about applying to some private schools because I would like to continue to try and become an RN, but I am considering becoming an LPN first. I'm sorry if you mentioned it in an earlier post, but are you considering getting a bachelors in nursing? I was looking at some schools that offer LPN/LVN to BSN and I saw that Molloy College out in Long Island has an accelerated program. I am definitely going to look into that.
  9. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    I think you're right, although I called Queensboro C.C. and they said they are still doing candidacy on a semester basis. I think the schools are getting too crowded or something, because I learned that there has been a high rate of people applying since last fall. Yes, that is what the plan is. If I don't get into the RN program, then I'll wait and probably retake a couple of classes while I wait. If you get a 3.7 GPA, then I think you'll have a pretty good lead. And the department told me if you end up taking other nursing classes that are not part of the curriculum, they won't even look at it. They'll calculate your GPA based on your prerequisites. Did you register for classes yet?
  10. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    Queensboro Community College should have it as well as BMCC and I think there is one called Hostos in the Bronx. If you're already registered at LaGuardia, then you should give it a shot. I'm not sure if registration for those other schools have ended already, but probably not. The only drawback to that is if you register at another school, the key course classes might be filled up already. I am not sure if the other CUNY schools start earlier than LaGuardia. I am sure it would be less of a wait for you if you're going to take the prereqs slowly. It might even be beneficial if you spread them out and get more time to study. But just be sure to score as high as you can in your classes, just in case. I don't know why they are changing the program; I will find out before I go to class tomorrow. If I find out anything else new I will post it.
  11. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    Hello Honest, Sorry it has been a while. I just finished midterms. To tell you the truth, I am not sure what they would do. Usually when credits transfer, the grades do not. They may not have the grade transferred but in the off chance it does get counted against you, you would have to get permission from the department (I am not sure if it is the nursing department or psychology) to retake it. It is doable, there are people I know now who took Human Biology I at LaGuardia and are retaking it again this semester. I have some bad news however, because I just learned from the department yesterday that starting this fall students will no longer be eligible to apply for candidacy for LPN in the fall semester and that applying for LPN candidacy is now once a year every March. It is troublesome because this may mean that getting into the LPN program may become even more competitive because when we were able to apply every semester there were ninety seats per semester. But now there are ninety seats for one year. This is also troublesome for me because I don't think that I will get into the RN program after all and now I have to wait for a few months to apply for LPN candidacy. Getting into LaGuardia's nursing programs are hard enough as it is, but the nursing department told me that not all CUNY schools are implementing this. If you can go to another CUNY school to do LPN which offers by-semester candidacy, you should do it. Maybe for me staying at LaGuardia will be a waste of time and now I'm looking at other programs, too.
  12. Plain Vanilla

    Transfer between nursing school?

    Whoops, misread thread.
  13. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    LPNs still have to take Human Biology II. Although it's not a key course (yet...the nursing program has been thinking about making SCB204 a key course probably for RNs, but I don't think they did that yet), you should still try to do your best in it since it counts for your overall GPA. Although what you can do is take just the prereqs and get into the program and then worry about 204 later (a friend of mine did that). Even if you're still finishing your prereqs during the spring semester, you can still apply for candidacy for the following fall. I asked my councelor about how they do that, and she told me that they consider the grade you got in your prereq after the end of the spring semester. Then the school sends you a letter in June sometime saying whether or not you got in the program. I'm not sure yet when the deadline for applying for spring session two is. When I find out, I will let you know.
  14. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    I just checked the website to take microbiology over the summer and they do offer the MAT106 summer course. There are not a lot of seats filled yet. If you take Psychology 101, I recommend Dr. ***** ******. I bought the book, only to not use it at all the entire semester. Instead I payed attention in class, wrote everything he wrote on the board into my notes, studied those notes and got an A. If you must use the book, borrow it from the library. They have the books there where you can take them out for two hours at a time while in the library. He is also very helpful and will explain anything you are unsure of in plain English. As for biology, unfortunately I have not heard about any specific lecture teacher being good. In fact, most of that class seems to be teaching yourself the things from the books and slides they show in class. It seems that all the lecture teachers read off of the slides and that is about it. Avoid Dr. * ******* if you can. I had him last semester and a lot of people found his quizzes difficult. He is very "from the book". He also doesn't have office hours, probably because he is an M.D. If you know who you are going to get for the lab, get Dr. ****** ************. He gives a list of all the names of the bones and muscles you need to know for the practicals. As for his written tests, just write everything he writes on the board (or whatever he talks about if he doesn't write anything) because that's all he bases his written tests on. I had Mr. * **** ******* for English and I found him to be a very lenient guy. As long as you do the essay, he will let you revise it again. He even said that if anyone needs help revising their essays, they can go to see him during his office hours and he will look over what you have and tell you what you have to improve. He seems like the kind of guy that as long as he sees you really making that effort, he will give you an A. But since you already took English 101, they'll probably just count that instead. As for the math, I don't know. The work is easy enough, so I don't think picking a professor will be too much of an issue.
  15. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    Hello Honest, I myself am not in the RN program (hopefully yet). Pretty much the best way to get into the program is to have a good GPA. If they set their LPN standards to 3.4 GPA, try to get a 3.6 or higher. What I'm trying to do is get A's in my current four credit classes so my GPA will "sky rocket". I've heard that what also makes you a good candidate is if you have completed all or most of the prerequisites that you need to take before all the nursing courses. A lot of my friends ended up dropping out of human biology I or got C's in them and are now looking at other schools to do nursing or taking that class again this semester. Needless to say, that will raise my chances and you'll probably see the same thing happening if they make you take those classes (especially in the fall semester). And if they do make you take classes like human biology I, you'll notice that most of the people in there are nursing majors. When I came back this semester to take human biology II, I noticed a lot of those people have gone. And the same ones I do see are applying to places like NYU. It's been making me wonder if there really are a lot of people trying get in this semester because it seems like there are drastically less people trying than last semester. If your GPA is really good you should try RN candidacy, although finishing the program will take longer.
  16. Plain Vanilla

    LaGuardia student, LPN advice needed

    Hello Honest, As far as I know, LPNs need three key courses that they need to do well in. They are human biology I, English 101, and Psychology 101. Since you have a bachelors, they will probably take into consideration the grades you recieved in those classes before. But, you could probably take them over again to get As in them if you really want to in case you didn't get As in them before. I'm not sure how it works, but I've heard about people taking classes like those over again because they got a C in for example English 101. You would have to ask an advisor about that. For the human biology, that one is going to be a killer. They cram a lot of information in the lecture and you have memorize the various names of the bones and muscles in your body for the lab. And not just the bone, they want you memorize the names of certain nooks and crannies. I ended up getting a B in that class, but if you get a B and you're applying for LPN you should be fine. A lot of people I know actually switched their majors to LPN because they got a B in that very class. And for GPA requirement, I believe that they want 3.6. When you start taking the classes, they'll want you to take the class called "Medical Dosages" and make sure to get an A in it. The class itself was pretty easy (think: fractions, converting things from miligrams to grams...vice versa, and memorizing abbreviations) so you should have no problem and I'm sure you will find it a piece of cake. The whole program itself seems to take about a year or a little more than a year to finish; 48 credits. In fact if you do the three key courses, you can apply for LPN candidacy that same semester. Just be sure to apply early though. So that when you finish that semester, the school will send you a letter saying whether or not you can go on and take the actual courses for the next semester. Hope it helps!