How to make a good impression precepting

Posted
by favthing favthing, APRN Member

Has 5 years experience.

I am in my first semester of NP school, and I have been trying to get information about how to prepare for my precepting experience. I would value any input about qualities and personal attributes which NP preceptors value in students. I plan to start clinicals in summer 2017. Thank you.

Rocknurse, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Critical Care and ED. Has 33 years experience. 1,367 Posts

I'm interested in this thread also as I'm starting my clinicals in January and I want to make a good impression and stand out.

rnsrgr8t

rnsrgr8t

Specializes in Peds Urology,primary care, hem/onc. 395 Posts

Come prepared. Research your clinic site. Be familiar with the kind of patients they see. As soon as you are given your preceptor's contact information, contact them immediately to arrange your clinical dates. Remember, APN preceptors do not get paid to precept and typically have a busy clinic day. If there are things you need to do for your clinical site (any learning modules so you can use their EMR, going to security to get your ID etc) do that BEFORE your first clinical day. Find out the dress code (scrubs versus business attire). If it is business attire, look professional. Make sure you labcoat is clean, ironed. Sensible shoes as you may be on your feet most of the day. Ask questions, but at appropriate times (NOT when your preceptor is discussing the treatment plan with the patient/family).

I have precepted APN students for about 10 years. I do it because I love to teach. The students I appreciate the most are the ones that come prepared, ready to learn. They ask appropriate questions. Are good with my patients. Make an effort to learn and are invested in the experience.

It is similar to when you did your clinicals in nursing school. Remember you are a visitor and respect the space of where you are.

Good Luck!

missdeevah

missdeevah, NP

318 Posts

I know not too many of you precept, but any more input from those who do?

PG2018

PG2018

Specializes in Outpatient Psychiatry. 1,413 Posts

I'm actually trying to learn how to precept.

Palliative Care, DNP

Palliative Care, DNP

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner. 781 Posts

Be on time. If you don't know the answer to a question say I'm not sure let me look that up. Have resources to find what you don't know. There are a lot of apps like 5 Minute Clinical Consult, Epocrates, Up to Date, & FNP Notebook. You don't need to know everything but you do need to know how to find information. I don't know alone is not an appropriate answer. Look up conditions that you are unfamiliar with. If procedures come up make sure you watch, learn, & ask questions. Perform procedures that you have learned like Paps. Learn the names of all the employees you will work with. "Front desk girl" has a name.

missdeevah

missdeevah, NP

318 Posts

These tips helped me today. Today was day 1 with my OBGYN preceptor. Thanks!

Aromatic

Aromatic

Has 3 years experience. 2 Articles; 352 Posts

Be nice. Smile. Don't be a know it all. Act interested and want to learn. Also don't hump their leg.

CoolLikeThat

CoolLikeThat

34 Posts

1) be on time

2) be on time

3) be on time

4) if you cannot be on time call or text before you are 20 minutes late

5) whatever forms you need signed or filled out give me them up front and not 5 minutes before you leave

6) Ask questions and be prepared to answer questions - I want to know what you know and how I can help you and if I need to brush up on anything.

7) I don't have all the answers and I have to look stuff up all the time - so expect to look up what you don't know.

8) never ever chew gum

9) be nice to the other staff in the clinic and the hospital

10) don't think you are too good to check a temp or recheck a BP

11) do not get butt hurt if a patient/family would rather not be seen by a student

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 11 years experience. 3 Articles; 5,570 Posts

I precept lots of students. To make a good first impression:

1. Show up on time and properly dressed.

2. Be courteous to staff and patients.

3. Have a basic idea of the type of patients the practice sees and the type of meds they will likely be on.

4. Review your history and physical exam and be able to competently perform a basic one.

5. Be honest. There is never a situation where not being honest is good for you/patient/provider, "fake it till you make it" is not an acceptable thing in clinical practice or your education.

6. Have a point of care reference and know how to use it.

7. Remember while at clinic your focus is on the patients not your school work.

8. Thicken up your skin if you need to, be prepared to be put on the spot, its the best way to learn.

lhflanurseNP

lhflanurseNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Nurse Practitioner. Has 40 years experience. 737 Posts

6) Ask questions and be prepared to answer questions - I want to know what you know and how I can help you and if I need to brush up on anything.

7) I don't have all the answers and I have to look stuff up all the time - so expect to look up what you don't know.

These 2 statements are pearls...it shows you are vested in your career choice if you ask a question by starting out with what the problem is, what you think the diagnosis, treatment, etc. is, why you think so then ask for help! This shows critical thinking as well as this is how you will actually practice. Use this time to your advantage. If the preceptor does not know the answer, hopefully, as CoolLikeThat points out...they should be more than happy to research it with you!

Rocknurse, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Critical Care and ED. Has 33 years experience. 1,367 Posts

Thank you for your input everybody. My clinicals start in January and I have anxiety every time I think about it. I have nightmares of some awful surgeon in the ICU bombarding me with questions at rounds and I can't get the words out. Then I wake up shaking! I plan on doing clinicals in a critical care area so I am familiar with the environment and I plan on getting in early to review each patients chart before am rounds so that I can be prepared. Any other pointers regarding this?