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How hard is bedside nursing on the body?

Nurses   (492 Views | 8 Replies)

785 Profile Views; 19 Posts

How hard is it on the body? Can a small female do this job? 

 

Thanks! 

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Just me. specializes in None.

79 Posts; 471 Profile Views

I would say yes, it can be done by a petite female.  Equipment and staff will make a difference.  The facility you work in should have equipment for heavy lifting,etc.  But some physical activity is still needed. 

Good body mechanics are needed.  Raising the bed, bending your knees, etc.

It is hard on the body, for me it was the emotional part that took a physical toll.

 

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1,143 Posts; 7,813 Profile Views

Yes, it is very hard on the body, but any size female can do it.  I’m not the tallest person in the world, but I can perform my job.

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"nursy" has 40 years experience as a RN and specializes in ICU, ER, Home Health, Corrections, School Nurse.

240 Posts; 944 Profile Views

Short answer, it can be done.  Long answer, it depends on several factors:  what kind of physical shape you are in, what kind of population are you serving, and what kind of equipment does your facility have.  There is another thread here where a nurse is maintaining that everyone should be power lifting to help prevent injuries.  While I wouldn't go that far, strength training can certainly be helpful.  If your population includes a lot of physically debilitated over weight patients, that can be hard.  I discussed in a previous post that it took a lot of strength just to push a 1000 lb bed with a 350 pound patient in it, down a long hallway, and someone replied that in their facility the beds were motorized.  I don't think that is the norm, certainly not where I worked.  Also, how is your facility laid out, are you running around long long hallways where everything is spread out, are do you work somewhere that is designed with efficiency in mind. I was 60 years old when I worked in ICU, and I ran circles around some of the younger nurses, and I do work out and take care of myself.  Having said all that, when I got home after a 12 hour shift, I was tired and sore.  

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19 Posts; 785 Profile Views

Aw thank you. I am just afraid I cannot handle it, since I have a bad back and really weak hands. 

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

4 Followers; 1,748 Posts; 3,670 Profile Views

7 hours ago, starter12345 said:

Aw thank you. I am just afraid I cannot handle it, since I have a bad back and really weak hands. 

You may want to pursue something else in the medical field. Perhaps rad tech or US tech. You may end up working in a facility that has equipment, or doesn't,  or some. Sometimes equipment isn't available (broke, shared/being used elsewhere, etc). 

If you have a bad back, anything could happen to make it worse. Weak hands? For many patients, you will be their hands (cleaning, weight bearing assistance, personal care, dressing changes, etc).  There will be much time spent charting-either handwritten, or more commonly, on computer in an EHR. I don't know what weak hands means, but, this may not be a good fit for you.

Jobs away from the bedside generally require some experience at the bedside. 

Edited by Hoosier_RN

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7 Followers; 3,415 Posts; 24,117 Profile Views

You’re bad back is more of an issue than your size. I only weighed 86lbs when I started and I’m still here (albeit not 86lbs anymore 😳). 

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RNperdiem has 14 years experience as a RN.

1 Follower; 4,242 Posts; 29,785 Profile Views

Hard on the body includes working nights, early morning starts and sometimes rotating shifts. Sleep deprivation takes its toll. Lots of standing can be made easier with the right shoes, but lots of standing is tiring.

Bedside is possible for many of us, but as we get older, or get injured, we need to find something else.

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222 Posts; 2,804 Profile Views

13 hours ago, Wuzzie said:

You’re bad back is more of an issue than your size. I only weighed 86lbs when I started and I’m still here (albeit not 86lbs anymore 😳). 

I gained almost 86 pounds in one pregnancy...

I’m still crying over that weight. Especially since that baby now weighs over 86 pounds herself and I still haven’t lost anything 😫🤦🏻‍♀️

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