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Hospitals Firing Seasoned Nurses: Nurses FIGHT Back!

Nurses Article   (1,415,098 Views | 728 Replies | 812 Words)

7 Followers; 79 Articles; 53,236 Profile Views; 121 Posts

Facilities are firing seasoned, higher paid nurses and utilizing younger less experienced nurses. This cost-cutting measure is putting patients at risk, working nursing and support staff to the point of exhaustion, and causing staff to leave the profession. How can we get administrators to see that these measures are not effective and can cost lives? You are reading page 43 of Hospitals Firing Seasoned Nurses: Nurses FIGHT Back!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

5 Posts; 384 Profile Views

This is a pattern I have seen several times since I graduated nursing school in 1958. It reverses when statistics on patient care and mortality begin to prove the value of an experienced skilled nursing staff.

This was in a nursing home skilled care facility, not a hospital. A friend was in charge days. I worked nights. She was fired for a trumped up reason: A patient refused to eat and was losing weight. You cannot force someone to eat either physically or legally. When she was fired 8 more of us submitted our resignations! My friend then had to sue for unemployment and won. The only answer seems to be to make THEM hurt. It would take the same cooperation as having a union.

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CacaoNut2 specializes in Cardiac, Oncology, Travel, Surg, LTAC.

4 Posts; 914 Profile Views

What the "bean counters" don't understand is that the new, younger ones being hired do NOT do the SAME job that the experienced nurses do. We are the ones that teach the new ones how to be "real" nurses because they are not prepared to hit the floors running when they just get out of school. It will end up being the same as back when they tried to replace nurses with "patient techs", and people started dying. Soon more people will die unnecessarily because there are not enough experienced nurses on duty to care for all the patients that the nurses are expected to care for. It is not the nurses fault, and many of them will be quitting the hospitals because it will become too much for them...resulting in even less available nurse:patient ratio.

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abrazz has 12 years experience.

1 Post; 161 Profile Views

Our hospital is small and feeling the reimbursement crunch. We serve an impoverished area. Our staff has been cut beyond safe staffing. Multiple jobs are being placed on people without any increase in pay. Most days Med/Surg has no aides. Mandatory over-time is common. In the OR, staff came in at 7am and were there till midnight for scheduled cases and then covered call just to come back and do it all again. When we complained that we signed on for a 7-3:30 position they told us we had to do it anyway. There are no laws stating how long you can work a person apparently. My husband works Med/Surg and routinely has 9 patients and no CNA. He can't give baths or feed all his feeders as well as handle their medical needs. He is so drained and upset when he comes home. The nurses who are willing to drive an hour to the nearest hospital have left. The pay is poor. I made what the nurses in the clinic make now as CNA in an ICU 12 years ago. It's so depressing and frustrating because we all feel we have no voice. We are also afraid to say anything because we need our jobs and cannot drive to the city for new jobs due to child care limitations. I'm in school pursuing my FNP. My husband is an ADN. I have a BSN and have been a nurse for 12 years. Things get worse for the nurses here every year and I'm tired of it.

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30 Posts; 1,719 Profile Views

Would you like to know where those young, inexperienced RNs are coming from, and why they are so compliant? They have spent the last month plus one week in a local nursing home, where they spent the first month in orientation, and the last week dumped into a rehab unit were they were asked to care for any where from 12 to 30 SUB-ACUTE rehab patients with IV antibiotics, g-tubes, wound vacs, and a plethora of high tech issues that the hospital dumped way too early. They RUN out the door with NO notice and head straight into the arms of your administrators, willing to offer them twice as much money( which is still nothing for hospital work) fewer patients, and a promise that their high acuity patients will shortly be shipped out to the nursing homes they just left. Thank Medicare, Obamacare, and your elected officials who 1) Know LESS THAN NOTHING about healthcare, 2) are in the back pockets of your administrators and 3) think they're getting top-of-the-line health care at Walter Reed. HaHaHa...we get the last laugh there, anyway.

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1 Post; 234 Profile Views

amen sister! and thank you for saying it.

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2 Posts; 335 Profile Views

It is so hurtful to me as a nurse for over 26 years, that I found out after taking early retirement with the intention to continue working PRN, that the institution I devoted my life to no longer wanted my worthless ass because I was a meager ADN nurse. As it happens, they no longer want or will hire nurses with less than a BSN despite the fact that I taught most of the "young" nurses most of what they knew on our unit, I was in charge nearly every night I worked and maintained a level 4 ( the highest offered) through our clinical ladder as well as being credentialed within my area of practice, something I did completely on my own, not because it was a requirement. For all the classes, studies, precepting, and committees I worked on, the thanks I got was a slap in my face. When there was a nursing shortage and they were begging for ADN nurses, I was there. I took the same board exams as my BSN co workers, yet now I can't find work unless at the age of 56 I go back to school and receive an BSN so I can give their institution another bragging right. Where is the justice in any of this? I'm a good nurse but feel like a nothing failure. Hospitals seem to be more concerned with all their plaques on the wall than what's really going on at the bedside, and I can tell you it's scary & not good.

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1 Follower; 51 Articles; 4,800 Posts; 93,956 Profile Views

It has been nearly one year since I left a staff nurse position that I had held for 25 years.As an RN with over 30 years experience ,I was at the top of my pay scale.If management wants to replace senior staff they have multiple tactics to strongly encourage "retirement".Schedule changes,shift changes,improvement plans,poor evaluations and removal of incentive pay were only a few examples.The predictability of their plan was almost comical.Management thinks we have no idea what they are up to?The blatant disregard for patient safety and staff development will eventually bite them in their dollar driven behind.Healthcare is about individuals,that is why it can never succeed as a business-to many variables.Nursing is quickly losing the very essence of the profession.....young nurses need mentors and the "gut feeling" of an experienced nurse will alarm long before any electronic monitor.As the mother of a nurse I can only hope for improvement as she deals with the ever changing enviroment of healthcare.

If I could, I'd like this multiple times. There was never a truer statement than reflected here.

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1 Follower; 51 Articles; 4,800 Posts; 93,956 Profile Views

This is not a solution but just an individual measure..have any of you seasoned nurses (I'm knocking on that door at 50) offered or suggested to be part of a mentoring/preceptor program?

I sort of just did that and moved from operating as an island to being available as a resource using my years of experience to help the company versus only providing patient care.

Because in any number of hospitals, they use you to precept, to "mentor" only to then eliminate your position (in the case of an LPN) or some other tactic to get rid of you....AFTER you teach the new crew how to do everything.

Not THAT close to retirement age--and the pension that was discontinued long ago would give one $30 a month or something of that nature to use an early retirement option.

And then use the tactic with administrators (who are not nurses) that it is a "governmental mandate" that nurses be BSN's by 2020. No one mentions the ANA--which in my opinion is a marketing tool, right up there with magnet--just that no hospital is going to be paid if their staff is not BSN. And that is all administrators want to hear, then it's "big ones help the little ones, and then you can go away"

You would think that with all this brou-ha-ha that there would be floors of multiple new nurses. But that is not the case. If they can hire 3 new nurses for what a seasoned nurse is being paid, they will only hire 1. That way, bigger bonus for them......

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2 Posts; 335 Profile Views

I worked 40yrs in a general hospital and 15 experienced nurses were deleted....including me.

I am just appalled at this new and apparently nationwide way of thinking, I wrote to my board of nursing about it , but of course I received no reply.....I guess when we have another widespread nursing shortage (and we will) , then perhaps they will begin to give a crap. I hope all those new nurse -lets enjoy the ride while they can because eventually they are going to fall off without any experienced people to guide them, but then again they think they know everything so I suppose we're safe..NOT

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1 Post; 237 Profile Views

This article is exactly what is happening to bedside nurses. The art of nursing is dying. I have been a registered nurse for 44 years, and I remain at the bedside. My years of toiling are coming to a close in the next couple of years. I am afraid that the nurse of today has been trained to take care of the computer, and not the patient, and I just recently had my CEO, tell me and a seasoned colleague, "how fast and good the new nurses are at that". I told him to make sure he checked the patient, to see that they were not in as good a shape as the computer. Nursing for me was a calling, a career, but for most of the newer nurses, it is a job, and stepping stone to do something else, CRNA, CRNP, etc. More education is being pushed also, to obtain magnet status. At the cost of nurses realizing, "I will not get all this education and stay at the bedside, it is too hard, and the pay scale is too low." I have no solutions, they ask my opinion but do not value it, and this has been going on for years. I have someone to go the hospital with me for care, if and when I get sick. They will only understand when they are "in the bed." What they do not understand, is no matter whom was in the bed, I always treated them as my own, I do believe in the brotherhood of man, and that is something you cannot teach. Thank you for allowing me to express this.

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CHESSIE has 30 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, OR, Peds, Patient Education.

177 Posts; 6,475 Profile Views

It is not the ACA, which although it is a program that must be expanded and changed so that insurance companies are eliminated. They are making too much profit, even though it was "cut" to being able to make "only" a 20% profit. This profit is skewed, due to high overhead of many obscenely high salaries and elaborate buildings. At least more people have insurance and can access medical care.

There is blame, however, and it lies at the feet of the "do more with less" philosophy that has be prevalent since the "Trickle Down Economics" that began in the early 1980s, and still exists. Where the "Do More With Less" does not apply, is with administration. Haven't you noticed that the numbers of administrators, directors, and "clinical leaders," has exponentially increased over the years, as the numbers of those who actually do the clinical, experienced hands on care has decreased. I saw this scenario happening in 2005, when I retired, and that was before the ACA, and it was worse, ten years later, in January of 2015 when my husband was a patient. Staffing shortages were at a dangerous level, while the numbers of administrators had increased. The hospital where my husband was a patient, even had a "Vice President of Patient Care Excellence," who spoke with my husband for all of one minute, but when he heard my husband tell him of the staffing issues, this gentleman "suddenly had an urgent meeting to attend."

After my husband was D/C'd, he received a telephone call from another Vice President, who, also, had an "urgent meeting to attend" when she heard that the issue was not so much that my husband did not receive good care, but that there were too few nurses. Those who were there on the unit were excellent, and knowledgeable, but there were far too few.

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3,726 Posts; 24,035 Profile Views

These stories are heartbreaking. And make it odd to read so many other threads with posts encouraging pre and nursing students to stick with it.

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