Miles on my car

  1. Do you ever stress about the miles you are putting on your car while working?

    This seems to be stressing me out lately! I am trying to group my patients by area, but it just doesn't always work out that way.
  2. Visit anne_marie_oregon profile page

    About anne_marie_oregon, BSN, RN

    Joined: Nov '10; Posts: 128; Likes: 67
    RN; from US
    Specialty: 6 year(s) of experience in Nursing

    5 Comments

  3. by   pmabraham
    Hi Anne:

    Sometimes I consider getting a more economical car (EV, PHEV, or hybrid), but I don't fret the miles. Stressing about what we cannot control doesn't help. BTW, somedays I only drive 40 miles, and other days well over 300. A coworker had a 350 mile day a short while back.

    Thank you.
  4. by   TX.RN.Shannon
    I worked home health for about 5 years, up until a year ago. I live in rural Texas and averaged 75-150 miles per day. At first I drove a Dodge diesel pickup, then got a mid-size SUV. The truck was actually better on fuel mileage and made it much easier to go down gravel roads and through pastures! I actually got stuck in my SUV when going to a VERY rural location that had a muddy, black gumbo "trail" that was about 5 miles long.

    I did worry a bit about the car it then realized it was just part of Home Health.
  5. by   Kaisu
    I bought a brand new car and then was dropped into a rural area due to staff shortages. I have put on almost 10K miles in less than 3 months. On one of my trips over a very bad road I took a hard to see dip at too high a speed. 3500$ in damage to the underside of my beautiful car.

    I justify it this way. - With the hourly travel pay and mileage compensation, I earn my monthly car payment in just over 2 weeks. I think of the bright shiny thing as a tool - a tool I use to do a job I love.

    As the previous poster said, it is just part of Home Health.
  6. by   Libby1987
    My mileage varied over the years but as a career home health nurse, I agree with above poster about seeing your car as a tool.

    I've always driven modestly priced fairly efficient cars for work (18K price range, 25-30 miles/gal) with warranties based on years, not mileage.

    I always bought new and turned over about every 4 yrs for the reliability.

    With an average of a $350 car payment and reimbursement at $500-600 monthly, it was a wash.

    Tip: live by the office or in your patient territory for min miles and/or max mileage reimbursement as well as job satisfaction.
  7. by   cargalrn
    Here's an idea. Take the money you get for mileage and put it in the separate savings account for car expenses and a down payment for a new car when you need it.

close