Hmm...that's nice

Posted
by DiplomaNurseRN DiplomaNurseRN Member

Specializes in Pushing a rock .... Has 35 years experience.

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TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 41 years experience. 4,292 Posts

Usually I respond with enthusiasm because they are super helpful with repositioning the patient, helping her up to the bathroom, etc.. We chat about their specialty, and it's usually a nice conversation. I can honestly say I've only had a couple of bad interactions with the "I'm a nurse" crowd, and both times the person was not, in fact, a nurse but a CNA.

A real nurse generally doesn't have anything to prove. A CNA trying to pass him/herself off as a nurse already has issues so it often doesn't go well.

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 41 years experience. 4,292 Posts

I had a patient's parent who did that to me constantly, correcting me about medications because, "I'm a nurse!" Given that she kept confusing Ritalin and Risperdal, I had doubts. I got petty and looked up her license online, only to find out she didn't have one...yup, she was a CNA.

Was it tempting to remind her that pretending to be a nurse is illegal?

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 41 years experience. 4,292 Posts

Quoting Ben Dover: "How about a patient saying he'll call President Obama! So we handed him the phone and he then asked us.

"What's the number?" ONXnJ1I3q+441j9iT4+6rPQLUv5b8vF2vh7cvj2SxSrm84tZrPCVw057OITzaYnSrYQVMXs44UOAIIjs35wUw+VGJ65udwSQIR2sXUabaGtN2Jpuh9U+MBSGZGTm6M1keDlZGhsQ0TA="

In psych, I have mailed a number of restriction of rights forms to the White House, as we legally have to send them to anyone the patient requests and "the President" is a common one.

When I worked psych, we had a lot of patients who liked to tell us they were close personal friends with the current governor. You'd think we'd get a chance to meet her, but she never came to visit any of her many friends on the psych unit.

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions. 4 Articles; 7,907 Posts

Quoting Ben Dover: "How about a patient saying he'll call President Obama! So we handed him the phone and he then asked us.

"What's the number?" ONXnJ1I3q+441j9iT4+6rPQLUv5b8vF2vh7cvj2SxSrm84tZrPCVw057OITzaYnSrYQVMXs44UOAIIjs35wUw+VGJ65udwSQIR2sXUabaGtN2Jpuh9U+MBSGZGTm6M1keDlZGhsQ0TA="

In psych, I have mailed a number of restriction of rights forms to the White House, as we legally have to send them to anyone the patient requests and "the President" is a common one.

That's how I got to meet a few Secret Service agents. But it wasn't my patient so I didn't have to deal with them.

TriciaJ, RN

Specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory. Has 41 years experience. 4,292 Posts

Oh my gosh, this bugs me so much! That and the people who just waltz behind the nurses' station. I tell people that there is HIPAA protected information and they need to step around the nurses' station. The people who are over-the-shoulder-gawkers at the computer I tell them the same or just open the chart at the nurses' station.

I am admittedly very very territorial with the nurses' station. I don't know why but it really, REALLY gets my hackles up when family walks behind the desk. I guess I think of that as "our" area and people need to keep out LOL.

Every workplace in the world has some version of a "staff only" area. Some people are just boundary-challenged and need to be shown the door.

Wuzzie

4,833 Posts

Every workplace in the world has some version of a "staff only" area. Some people are just boundary-challenged and need to be shown the door.

I seriously embarrassed myself once by violating this. A friend of mine was in the ED where I had worked for 8 years but had been gone for about 6. I took a shortcut right through the huge nurses station in the middle as I used to do when I was employed there. I caught myself but it was too late. I got some shade thrown at me until a couple of my friends who still worked there vouched for me and we all had a good laugh.

bagladyrn

bagladyrn, RN

Specializes in OB. 2,286 Posts

When I worked psych, we had a lot of patients who liked to tell us they were close personal friends with the current governor. You'd think we'd get a chance to meet her, but she never came to visit any of her many friends on the psych unit.

Many years ago there was a pt. at the psych hospital at which I worked who frequently spoke of having played with the Grateful Dead. Everyone considered him delusional...until Jerry Garcia came to visit him.

Ben_Dover

Ben_Dover

254 Posts

That's how I got to meet a few Secret Service agents. But it wasn't my patient so I didn't have to deal with them.

Interesting, so the secret service agents actually show-up to investigate a claim or to be admitted?! :wideyed:

I think one of the moderators need to move this thread to Psychiatric Nursing thread... lol

Edited by Ben_Dover

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions. 4 Articles; 7,907 Posts

Interesting, so the secret service agents actually show-up to investigate a claim or to be admitted?! :wideyed:

Yes, yes they do. They also wanted us to notify them when we planned to discharge the patient. Not sure what happened to the patient after the patient left us--I wasn't involved in the discharge process as the patient wasn't on my unit.

fezz

fezz

29 Posts

I don't mind. I would probably say the same if I was hospitalized.

Ben_Dover

Ben_Dover

254 Posts

Yes, yes they do. They also wanted us to notify them when we planned to discharge the patient. Not sure what happened to the patient after the patient left us--I wasn't involved in the discharge process as the patient wasn't on my unit.

On a serious note...

That's great to know. I guess these people (Sec. Svc. Agents) don't take things lightly, which is a actually a good thing! :cool:

Susie2310

Susie2310

2,076 Posts

I have had family member nurses attempt to intimidate me and stand right next to me at the in-room computer looking over my shoulder asking questions. I despise that, too.

Are you sure they are really intending to intimidate you? Have you considered that they may simply be doing their best to learn about their family member's care? I have stood next to my relative's nurse and looked at the computer screen for my relative's EHR with him/her, and both of us had a conversation about aspects of my family member's care. I was my family member's authorized representative and POA. It is quite likely they were in a similar position, wanting to learn more about the care their family member was receiving. Why not try to be helpful towards them instead of despising them? Also, keep in mind that they may be lawfully entitled to ask questions about the patient's care and to receive proper answers.