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Susie2310

Susie2310

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Susie2310's Latest Activity

  1. I think the health official is doing what they can to help people to feel comfortable with getting vaccinated. I believe that is the intention. If being vaccinated discreetly (no waiting in public areas until you are called for your turn) is what it takes vs sitting in a waiting room waiting to be called into the vaccination room whether at the doctor's office or at the drug store or in the parking lot, then the very worthy goal of getting more people vaccinated is accomplished. I read today that 57% of people in the US have received one dose of the Covid vaccine, and the number that is fully vaccinated is still less than 50%. A number of states lag behind in vaccinations, and even in states with higher numbers of vaccinations there are still pockets that remain mostly unvaccinated. With the Delta variant now the dominant variant in the US, we can expect increasing numbers of cases and more burdening of the health care systems and more deaths. Are you aware of the current situation in the UK? So I don't think the health official was doing anything frivolous or unnecessary by stating that people can be vaccinated discreetly. I think it was a responsible, appropriate, action, with the aim of encouraging people who have reservations about being vaccinated to be vaccinated, thus preventing more suffering, deaths, and burdening of the health care systems, and of preventing more lockdowns and more financial burdens both for individuals and for the economy. I don't see anything to gripe about.
  2. Susie2310

    Hernia Repair Patient Dignity

    If I understood correctly, the nurses didn't explain to the patient the reason why they needed to check the patient's genital area, and they didn't ask the patient for their permission to do this. By not asking permission before doing this, and by not explaining the reason for needing to do this check, a patient experiencing this activity being done to them in an impersonal manner without their permission (particularly as more than one nurse came in at different times to do this check) could have perceived the nurses who performed this activity as spectators - that is, people (albeit nurses) who are watching something happen (the event being the post-op condition of the patient's genital area). In my view, communication is key here; introducing oneself if you haven't provided care to the patient before, explaining what you need to do and why, and asking the patient if you can go ahead with the check before doing it.
  3. Susie2310

    Hernia Repair Patient Dignity

    To be a spectator means to watch an event. I think this is what the poster you were replying to was referring to.
  4. Susie2310

    Predatory New Grad Contracts

    If the contract clearly specified the OP's responsibilities and the facility's responsibilities in writing, so that the OP would have known upon reading it that there was a financial penalty for not completing the contract, I don't think, unfortunately, that the OP really has a basis for saying that they shouldn't have to pay this penalty, if they chose, for whatever reason, to not complete the contract. The OP could seek legal advice. I agree that some people do not properly understand the full ramifications of a contract, and may not have access to legal advice prior to signing contracts, and I think that is unfortunate. I also agree that workplace conditions are often far from ideal - this is risk one takes when one takes a job - but again, even if the OP was experiencing this and was unable to or chose not to try to resolve the situation with their employer, and decided to leave because of this, which is their right, they still agreed via the contract to pay back a specified amount of money if they didn't remain with their employer for x amount of time. I'm not saying that I think the situation was fair, or that the OP doesn't have reason to feel aggrieved about it, or that naivetee doesn't make one vulnerable to not fully understanding what a contract entails, just that, as I understand it, the OP incurred responsibility due to their decision to sign the contract. I think the lesson for the future is to: 1) Be very careful about what one signs; 2) Ensure one fully understands the ramifications of a contract and the consequences for non-completion for any reason, and 3) Prior to signing a contract, forsee the worst case scenario, I.e. feeling one needs to leave the employer prior to completing the contract.
  5. Susie2310

    Hospice Patient’s Family Refusing Hospice Cares

    Respectfully, I think your example of: "See how much I love you Mother? etc." is generally inaccurate. I think staff often tend to perceive that the patient's family member is motivated by guilt and is trying to control the staff by making gestures in order to show their loved one (the patient) how much they care for them. It's usually more complicated than that and goes much deeper. Family members are usually trying their best to care for their loved one during a very painful time, and are trying to think about what their loved one would want, even if staff perceive that family members are under-managing or over-managing their loved one's pain. Family members have an emotional relationship with the patient and very often know the patient well and know their preferences. It is important that staff have the maturity and compassion to be able to meet family members where they are, as individuals, in order to be able to support them. To be able to do this one needs to be able to listen to them with an open mind.
  6. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    The above sounds very reasonable and sensible to me. The section "How might this be applied to practice?" focuses on good communication with patients and on building trust with patients, which I think we would agree is essential to good patient relationships.
  7. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    I added a correction in bold above.
  8. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    4 hours ago, Susie2310 said: I'm not talking about an auto-response. I'M TALKING ABOUT A MESSAGE APPENDED TO THE RADIOLOGY RESULTS STATING THAT CONTEXT FOR THE RADIOLOGY REPORT NEEDS TO BE PROVIDED BY THE ORDERING PROVIDER, WHICH IS FOLLOWED UP TIMELY BY THE ORDERING PROVIDER INTERACTING WITH THE PATIENT TO PROVIDE THIS CONTEXT, or, if the ordering provider has already viewed the report when the patient receives it, the ordering provider can use their judgment to include a personal note along with it. I capitalized the part you are referring to as the bold option wasn't available. In my view, the ordering provider following up with the patient TIMELY after the report is released to the patient (as I stated above) should serve to minimize harm/anxiety to the patient if the report is released to the patient before the ordering provider is able to view the report and provide their comment/interpretation before it is released to the patient. I agree that it is preferential for the ordering provider to review the report and provide their comment before it is released to the patient.
  9. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    My comments that you are taking issue with were: Susie2310 Add your Credentials, Experience, etc. 654 Likes 1,974 Posts 17 hours ago On 3/4/2021 at 12:46 AM, TheMoonisMyLantern said: A radiologist's interpretation doesn't provide context and ultimately the attending physician has to determine clinical relevance. I think results should be released with the ordering provider's comments providing context for what the radiologist saw. My reply to the above poster was: "A facility can add a note to the released record stating that the ordering provider needs to provide context for the radiology report findings. I've seen this done." Then I replied to your first reply to me: Susie2310 Add your Credentials, Experience, etc. 654 Likes 1,974 Posts 59 minutes ago 6 hours ago, Wuzzie said: You can’t really think a generic note like this will make a difference? A personal note from the provider sure but an auto-response? Come on. My reply to you was: "I'm not talking about an auto-response. I'm talking about a message appended to the radiology results stating that context for the radiology report needs to be provided by the ordering provider, which is followed up timely by the ordering provider interacting with the patient to provide this context, or, if the ordering provider has already viewed the report when the patient receives it, the ordering provider can use their judgment to include a personal note along with it. " Then I replied to your second reply to me: Wuzzie 9,818 Likes 4,230 Posts 41 minutes ago 1 hour ago, Susie2310 said: I'm talking about a message appended to the radiology results stating that context for the radiology report needs to be provided by the ordering provider, How is that any different? You still have a patient with a report that they don’t understand and looks to them like their cancer is back or progressing. What is the value in having that report released? How can anyone think this doesn’t result in harm to the patient? What is the risk in delaying it for say 24-48 hours to give the provider time to review and make a notation? I replied that: "I said that if the ordering provider has already viewed the report they can use their judgment to send a personal note along with it. I would also presume that for significant findings the radiologist would contact the ordering provider promptly, so the ordering provider would be able to contact the patient timely if necessary." My clarifying and adding more information so you can more fully understand my position doesn't signal any negative behavior on my part. Wuzzie, it's fine with me if you disagree with me - I have no problem with agreeing to disagree, but I don't see any value in both of us continuing to go back and forth, so I'm not going to continue to debate this point with you any further.
  10. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    I said that if the ordering provider has already viewed the report they can use their judgment to send a personal note along with it. I would also presume that for significant findings the radiologist would contact the ordering provider promptly, so the ordering provider would be able to contact the patient timely if necessary.
  11. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    Why? We're professional nurses with licenses and we always say we want to be thought of as professionals. Part of being a professional is being accountable to the public for the professional nursing care one provides, just as other licensed professions that deal with the public are held accountable for the service/care they provide the public and don't provide service/care anonymously. Doctors don't provide medical care anonymously - their full names are on their badges which are visible and not turned backwards or covered up, and their last names are on the patients' medical records.
  12. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    I'm not talking about an auto-response. I'm talking about a message appended to the radiology results stating that context for the radiology report needs to be provided by the ordering provider, which is followed up timely by the ordering provider interacting with the patient to provide this context, or, if the ordering provider has already viewed the report when the patient receives it, the ordering provider can use their judgment to include a personal note along with it.
  13. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    A facility can add a note to the released record stating that the ordering provider needs to provide context for the radiology report findings. I've seen this done.
  14. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    A poster on this thread said that they work in psych and that they document as though the patient is reading the information, and gave tips for documenting objectively and diplomatically. I am not suggesting that anyone here does this, but if one documents in an inflammatory, disrespectful way, including subjective perceptions about a patient/their situation in the medical record, I think one must accept responsibility if a patient doesn't respond positively to this when they read their record. In my view it behoves nurses to be mindful of how they are interacting with patients and their family members as this will naturally influence their documentation.
  15. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    I hear your concern for this situation, and I do think this situation was very unfortunate. Over the entire population of patients I still believe the benefits of making patient records available to the patient and thus greatly increasing their knowledge of the care they are receiving/their medical conditions without their having to go through the time consuming process of going through medical records to obtain information about each individual patient encounter, far outweighs the disadvantages to patients as a population.
  16. Susie2310

    Patients Viewing Nursing Notes In Real Time

    I'm aware that HIPAA doesn't preclude a facility/individuals from listening to what a family member has to say (although I have experienced situation/s where it has been made difficult for the family member to provide information on their initial call to the facility due to strict implementation of patient privacy rights) especially if they are stating that the patient could be in danger/expressing concerns for the patient's wellbeing. I wasn't suggesting that you/your facility didn't follow correct HIPAA practices, but it seemed possible to me from what you had written, since I don't know your facility's privacy practices or the patient's relationship with their family members, or the patient's communication with their providers related to who the patient wished their PHI to be disclosed to, that something could have gone astray in these areas, or that the internal process for dealing with such calls could benefit from being evaluated and possibly adjusted.