Student Charge Nurse out of line

  1. I'm upset due to an issue that happened at a recent clinical. I was having a problem taking a patient's blood pressure and so I asked another student for assistance. Our student "charge" also came into the room for some reason. I told her what was happening and she suggested taking a manual. Great idea...prob should have thought of that myself, but I did not. In any event, I was successful taking the manual bp. As I was entering the vitals she came and asked me about the bp. I tripped over my words and then told her the reading.

    I cannot for the life of me figure out why she went and asked the other student that was present if she "saw" me take the blood pressure. The only thing I can think of is that she thought I was lying because I kind of stumbled with my response.

    It's bothering me and I can't decide if I should approach her or not. I probably need to work on my "let it go" skills but at the same time I feel like she crossed a line. I'm a fully accountable individual and the last thing I would ever do is pretend that I got a bp.

    Any advice?
  2. Visit cin808 profile page

    About cin808

    Joined: Dec '16; Posts: 33; Likes: 16
    from NJ , US

    24 Comments

  3. by   Cindyel
    Imo let it go. It will not help anything. It is not like she reported you or caused you any headaches.
  4. by   Emergent
    We never had these in my school. It sounds like it's totally gone to her head. Very annoying indeed.

    I agree, let it go.
  5. by   Wiggly Litchi
    Student charge nurse? As if nursing school needed more drama <_>

    I agree with the others - let it go. If she's annoying you, chances are she's annoying others too and won't make herself many friends.
  6. by   broughden
    Quote from Wiggly Litchi
    Student charge nurse? As if nursing school needed more drama <_>

    I agree with the others - let it go. If she's annoying you, chances are she's annoying others too and won't make herself many friends.
    Nursing school ALWAYS needs more drama! It feeds on it!
  7. by   llg
    I agree with the others. Let it go.

    But ... just as a cautionary note ... there will be people checking up on your for the rest of your career. You'll need to stop being offended by that to be happy as a nurse. Double-checking, confirming, etc. is a routine part of nursing. You can't survive if you get offended/upset every time somebody double-checks your work. (e.g. double-checking narcotics wastage -- "How dare they think i would be diverting narcotics!" .... or pain assessments -- "How dare they think I would allow my patient to lie there in pain!" etc.) It's all routine and rarely personal.
  8. by   Lipoma
    Looooord, that title def went to their head.
    I was a student charge for 3 clinical days and was "responsible" for 2 students and 8 patients. All I cared about was that charting was complete at the end of the day.

    Going back to ask another student "did you see them do... Blah blah blah" is just down right mean girl. There's a real nurse who is actually responsible for the patient... Nothing we do is final because that would not hold up in court "well the student said... Did this..."

    I'd say let it go. If they're not the ones grading you or cutting you a check, let it roll off your sleeves.
    Last edit by Lipoma on Sep 24
  9. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from Lipoma
    I was a student charge for 3 clinical days and was "responsible" for 2 students and 8 patients. All I cared about was that charting was complete at the end of the day.
    This just sounds asinine. "Student charge"??? Is this some way to cover for the fact that they are assigning too many students to their clinical instructors? What responsibilities were you given by your school?

    Quote from Lipoma
    Going back to ask another student "did you see them do... Blah blah blah" is just down right mean girl.
    If the student charge had doubts about whether or not the OP actually did the blood pressure, then this is not being "mean," she is advocating for the patient.

    As said in an earlier post, nurses often must double check each other's work. This is for the safety of the patient. If you are doing your job well, there is no reason to be worried or offended.
  10. by   babychickens
    [QUOTE=Horseshoe;9945205]This just sounds asinine. "Student charge"??? Is this some way to cover for the fact that they are assigning too many students to their clinical instructors? What responsibilities were you given by your school?



    That's exactly what it is. Those don't exist in smaller groups. My professor has told me as much. Just wait til she tries to claim "student charge nurse" on her resume. ROFL
  11. by   mtmkjr
    I never heard of "student charge nurse", but I graduated in the ancient days.
    If there is such a thing, I'm sure it is to provide a new range of experience during clinicals. OK.
    We always had a debriefing time post-clinical. I think it would be helpful to discuss with the students and instructor what is appropriate in the roll of charge and what is not appropriate, and whether she was genuinely concerned or being over-zealous. What is the point of "practicing charge" if not to learn?
    If not in a debriefing with all students, perhaps privately with the other student and your instructor.
  12. by   Lipoma
    Quote from Horseshoe
    This just sounds asinine. "Student charge"??? Is this some way to cover for the fact that they are assigning too many students to their clinical instructors? What responsibilities were you given by your school?



    If the student charge had doubts about whether or not the OP actually did the blood pressure, then this is not being "mean," she is advocating for the patient.

    As said in an earlier post, nurses often must double check each other's work. This is for the safety of the patient. If you are doing your job well, there is no reason to be worried or offended.
    1: It sounds asisine because you did not do it as a student. People tend to be against anything they are inexperienced with. Also being a charge is part of a nurse's scope, so why not get exposure to that role during nursing school and learn what it entails? Nurses are becoming charge nurses within a year of being in practice. As the charge, we were to get report on ALL of those patients under the care of that student, cover lunch breaks, help with med passes, morning care, and to be an extra hand to our fellow students.

    If they were falling behind, we would be of an assistance to get them back up to speed. If the students had any issues they would come to us and we would work through it (you know... problem solve) before we go to the instructor/nurs. It's all about time management.

    All of my clinical groups had 7 students and during our final preceptorship, we had 5 students for 1 instructor...but we were assigned to 1 nurse and all of their patients during that 12 hour shift.

    2: If they had doubts they would approach their fellow student themself and inquire if they had any issues getting the blood pressure (example of double checking each other). A licensed nurse would go straight to the source and not to ANOTHER NURSE to gossip (example of not double checking each other). That's how lateral bullying occurs and the forming of cliques. If she was advocating for the patient, she would retake the blood pressure herself and compare results (to note any large discrepancy). Let's not fool ourselves, the title "charge" went to their head and they took this role way too serious.

    You state if you're doing your job well then they shouldn't be offended? Yet, everyday on this forum there is a seasoned nurse who is doing their job well complaining of upper management micromanaging them. Frustration is part of the job, but my take is to let things roll of your sleeves if they're not "cutting you a check"
  13. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from Lipoma
    1: It sounds asisine because you did not do it as a student. People tend to be against anything they are inexperienced with.
    Not necessarily.

    Quote from Lipoma
    Also being a charge is part of a nurse's scope, so why not get exposure to that role during nursing school and learn what it entails? Nurses are becoming charge nurses within a year of being in practice. As the charge, we were to get report on ALL of those patients under the care of that student, cover lunch breaks, help with med passes, morning care, and to be an extra hand to our fellow students.

    The actual role of charge entails being a clinical resource. Student charge could well be a case of the blind leading the blind. New nurses shouldn't be charge either. Per many threads on AN, new nurses are often preceptors too. Just because it's done doesn't mean it is good practice.

    Quote from Lipoma
    You state if you're doing your job well then they shouldn't be offended? Yet, everyday on this forum there is a seasoned nurse who is doing their job well complaining of upper management micromanaging them.
    We have no idea if nurses who claim to be doing their jobs well are actually doing that. This is the internet. If you are truly making no mistakes, none will be found. If you are, then the second checks that are in place to protect patients are a good thing. I don't care if people complain about it online. Not to mention, many of the checks that are put in place are carried out not just by management, but by fellow staff nurses.
  14. by   Chrispy11
    I just graduated in May. Last clinical group we had a team leader and a safety monitor each week. We rotated the rolls weekly. We had one get uppity like that and the group just blew it off. A lot of times people do that to hide their own securities. Anyway come pinning night, guess who wasn't there? Turns out someone was passing clinical, but not the exams. Not saying this is the case with yours, but just saying there's always some reason behind the behavior. The only opinion that matters in the end is your clinical instructor's. In your shoes I wouldn't worry in the least.

close