Looking for some advice before making a mistake. - page 7

Okay to start this discussion I would like to first explain and introduce myself. I'm a 22 year old male Firefighter who has been on the job for about a year and a half now. As everyone probably... Read More

  1. by   Extra Pickles
    Quote from italianlifter
    Hello Extra Pickles,
    Thank you for responding to my poster and I would like to first off by saying that yes if anyone would to read my username then they would assume exactly what you are assuming but that goes back to the old saying "Never Judge a book by its cover." I understand that my name does not indicate nursing by any means but no offense your name in my view does not as well but I am not judging you cause by your post you seem like a very well educated individual.
    Very good point about the name thing! what I meant was that usually when someone comes here to ask about whether they should be a nurse or a PA or something else they choose a userID that is more keeping with that theme, something that says Nurse On The Brain lol. It's pretty common to see Aspiring Nurse or Future Medical Person in some way in their name and you chose something entirely unrelated, that's all I was saying. It just occurred to me that the First and Foremost thing on your brain was weightlifting and not nursing. LOL Yes Extra Pickles is definitely not Nursey sounding but in my defense I have been a nurse for so long it seems Old Hat and I don't trumpet it in my name like so many do! I wish you good luck in figuring all this out, it's a lot to consider.
  2. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from ItsThatJenGirl
    Paramedics aren't firefighters around here. They may be housed in a fire station, but they don't run into fires.

    You don't want to work long shifts because you don't want your job to cut into your workouts. You don't like bathing or pee. You're worried about debt.

    Have you even looked into what nursing school costs? What being a nurse entails? What nursing schedules in your area even look like? The demand for nurses? Scope of practice?

    You want a rewarding career, that pays well and meets your (slightly ridiculous) standards, that has a cheap degree. And you want people on the internet, that don't know you at all to tell you what to do.

    Good luck with all that.
    He sounds like a decent young man who just is trying to explore the world of work and make a good decision.

    Why put him down like this? If he had all the answers, he wouldn't have come here.
  3. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from italianlifter
    Hello Studentnurse365,
    Thank you for your post and giving me your advice which is greatly appreciated. I would like to first say to everyone that has recently posted something, my intentions when I first started this thread was to just get an idea of what would be my best option while receiving great advice for experienced medical personal. Felt at the beginning that it started off bad but then eventually everything calmed down and everyone was giving great advice and working with me which I felt was heartwarming and honestly I received more then I should of and I cant begin to thank everyone here. Just recently there have been a couple post that just seemed unnecessary due to that fact that it started to turn into an argument with people on this thread and honestly I don't want it to come down to that and would like everyone to try and get along and I don't wanna sound rude when I say this but if you can't post anything nice then you do not have to post anything in the first place. I understand everyone means well and wanna give there advice but all I ask is that when you do be mature about it cause not everyone will agree with each other, thats why this thread was made to listen to everyones opinions.

    Now that I said all that I would like to respond, firstly the ADN route might be the cheapest route and I can totally understand your advice and what you are coming from but I would also like to mention that if I do decide to go the PA route which sounds more along the lines of my career field I might as well just get my Bachelors and hopefully get into a PA school even though it is very competitive. The only thing I am concerned about with the PA school is not getting in and then kinda feeling lost at that point. I'm not saying that NP is a lot easier or a better route by any means but what I am going to say is at least when I become a BSN and decide to to become a NP, I can at least get into the school and have a chance of passing the school. Its hard to choose between the two careers though and what is truly stressing me out is the new semester for school starts in October and I have a little less then a month to make my decision so I can start to sign up for school. I understand Im the only one who can make my own decision and no one else can but thats why I started this thread, just to hear everyones advice. Worse case scenario I can always join the military after I receive my degree but we will see.
    The military would likely give you an opportunity to be in great physical condition, exercise, travel, meet lots of interesting people all over the country or world, and get into a career you really enjoy, plus there are good benefits for military members who do their 20 years. Please seriously explore the different branches - Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, and so on.

    Seriously consider the military.

    And don't mind the crabby, mean people wherever they might be - here, in the world, wherever. A lot of people are jealous because you are young and healthy and have your whole life ahead of you. Be nice to all, as best you can.
  4. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from Extra Pickles
    Very good point about the name thing! what I meant was that usually when someone comes here to ask about whether they should be a nurse or a PA or something else they choose a userID that is more keeping with that theme, something that says Nurse On The Brain lol. It's pretty common to see Aspiring Nurse or Future Medical Person in some way in their name and you chose something entirely unrelated, that's all I was saying. It just occurred to me that the First and Foremost thing on your brain was weightlifting and not nursing. LOL Yes Extra Pickles is definitely not Nursey sounding but in my defense I have been a nurse for so long it seems Old Hat and I don't trumpet it in my name like so many do! I wish you good luck in figuring all this out, it's a lot to consider.
    My screen name is based of an old email address (Carolina like the state, Pooh like the bear). If you see a carolinapooh on the web, it's likely me. It's unique. I've used it literally for the last twenty-two years and used it here before I even started school.

    It has nothing to do with nursing. A screen name doesn't have to trumpet your interests and it doesn't mean you're not interested in a forum topic. My screen name on a travel forum I belong to is the name my dog's microchip was registered under when I adopted him. Easy to remember and unique. Doesn't mean I don't love to travel. I find this observation odd.

    OP, I'm an active duty Air Force nurse. If you have any questions about that branch of service, feel free to PM me.
  5. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Hi, italianlifter. As you are already a firefighter, you are ambitious and intelligent.
    If you feel a nursing degree would be beneficial to your goal, please discuss with academic advisors. We are nurses, not school counselors.

    You are WAAY ahead of yourself worrying about bed baths and toileting. You would need to learn these skills in clinical education. In the grand scheme of things, you will be delegating that to nursing assistants.
    You will be able to earn a degree through a community college, in less than 6 years, with a lower debt. I have an ASN, I started out as a cardiovascular nurse.. you can too.

    Best of luck.. let us know what the advisors tell you.
    Hi, BTDT

    I always enjoy your posts. But didn't you get your degree a long time ago and you now work at home for insurance? This young fellow is just starting out and I'm not sure the Associate's Degree is the way to go any more. So many here say a BSN is just about mandatory. I don't know, I am just asking.

    Peace
  6. by   TellYourGFThanks
    Why not take your EMT to the hospital? 1/3 of certified EMTs work as techs in the ER, etc. And if you get your paramedic youll be well-desired for an ER role. And then it's all medicine
  7. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Hi, BTDT

    I always enjoy your posts. But didn't you get your degree a long time ago and you now work at home for insurance? This young fellow is just starting out and I'm not sure the Associate's Degree is the way to go any more. So many here say a BSN is just about mandatory. I don't know, I am just asking.

    Peace
    It all depends on the geographical region. In some areas, BSN is pretty much required. In others, it absolutely is not.
  8. by   BeenThere2012
    Quote from italianlifter
    Hello Guttercat,
    See the reason why I keep switching back and forth is cause I keep reading about the requirements about becoming a PA and how tough it is just to get into the school. Stuff like that really scares me cause I hear people talking about have better then the minimum requirements and still not getting accepted in and Im not going to sit here and tell you I'm the smartest guy out there cause I am far from that but what I can say is that I am a hard worker and I am willing to work for something. I am just nervous that I will not get accepted into PA school no matter how well I do. Sorry for the sob story.
    Italian lifter...Over the years of applying to schools at different times in my career, I often, in fact, usually heard how tough it is to get in, only 40 spots for 200 applicants and so on, and got in every time. I am not "super" smart either. I think a lot of the decision comes in with how you present yourself, how much they see you want it and will be a good fit etc...The fact that you already have some medical background will tell them you have an idea of what you are getting yourself into and so on. Your devotion to the program and to achieve will go a long way. I wouldn't worry about how hard it is to get in if that is what you really want. If you don't get in the first time, then try again. Or, switch gears at that point if you want, but don't shoot yourself in the foot before you even try. The only looser is a quitter. Nothing in life is guaranteed. You seem to be wanting assurances before you even start. That is not available for anyone. You just need to figure out exactly what you want and start planning from there. That is what everyone does and the only way to go. That is, just go for it!
  9. by   the4ofus
    One is a nurse the other is medical the focus is different.
  10. by   the4ofus
    I'm a bit confused by your posts. Physician's assistants have a medical focus; Nurse Practitioner have a nursing focus. I do not understand why a person would choose nursing as a profession and then switch to a medical focus. It sound like you may want to do some more research as to the direction that you want to go. If you don't love what you are doing and you are choosing it for any other variety of reasons you will be very disappointed in your career choice. The challenges will be even harder as they come at you and the same challenges will come more often with more vengeance. If you want to be an RN and then go to PA school you may want to just keep going and become an NP. Other wise I would get a biology or chemistry degree and then apply to PA school. Even though the perspective is different for a PA and an NP they are somewhat similar. You will always be answering to someone no matter what you do. The licensing laws are changing faster than one can keep up with.

    Nursing school at any level is extremely competitive just as I'm sure physician's assistant school is competitive. Not only was it difficult to get into nursing school but it was also extremely difficult as the cut began to take place. Every semester our class size diminished; 36 started and 9 finished. The nine who finished all finished with honors. I'm not sure how many passed the exam the first time around, but it was not all of us. Once you are in the nursing tract it is easier to keep going. If you don't get in the first time and have good grades then you try again until you get in if that is really what you want to do.

    I would encourage you to do your homework, take some placement tests, and some personality type tests that help you determine what your strengths are and see how those strengths fit with possible career tracts. In the mean time get into school and start applying yourself to make the best grades you can possibly make. The closer you are to a 4.0/4.0 GPA you are the easier it will be for you to get into the school you want. GA has some great schools all the way around.

    Would you be a NP/PA no matter how much they paid you as long as it was a living wage? How much does the money really play into your career choice. Wishing you the best.
  11. by   BeenThere2012
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Hi, BTDT

    I always enjoy your posts. But didn't you get your degree a long time ago and you now work at home for insurance? This young fellow is just starting out and I'm not sure the Associate's Degree is the way to go any more. So many here say a BSN is just about mandatory. I don't know, I am just asking.

    Peace
    As several of us have responded, I think Beenthere,donethat is simply saying to START with the associates. He has already stated he wants a bachelors degree. He is trying to decided which route to go 1) to achieve that and his ultimate goal in the least expensive way, and 2) trying to decide if after that, he should look into PA or NP.
  12. by   trudlebug
    If you want to look at the Military option: They will pay tuition/student loans for physicians, nurses, and other healthcare jobs. I don't know the service obligations, but many people do this. I know they did have a program where you enlisted as ROTC with a College/University and they paid for schooling, then you entered the service, but I don't know if that is still an option.

    The military can be a great starting point for a lot of people, and there are a lot of benefits during and after service. But also a lot of hard work, being away from home and the possibility of being deployed to a war zone. If you are able to get into one of these programs - you can get your degree AND experience that will probably open doors to a lot of opportunities once you get out.

    Whatever program is available, make sure if your recruiter says that you have something as a benefit - GET IT IN WRITING! Also make sure all the details about what happens if you don't complete the service obligation.

    Sounds like you are good at doing research, so you should be fine. But recruiters are just sales-people, don't let them double talk you! (My husband spent 3 years as an enlisted recruiter, he tried to be honest and helpful, but he HATED it, because it was all about the numbers.)

    I am stressing this because when I joined (enlisted - not a healthcare field), I didn't follow up on all the details and lost some benefits. I'm not saying it was a bad choice, I was the one who didn't read the fine print. However, my husband did remain in the service, and I was able to get my nursing degree and then work at the military hospital. He recently retired after 25 years. Then he decided to go to nursing school

    You have a lot of options - and I wish you the best of luck!

    PS another small bonus - not as much "toileting" for patients at military hospitals. Most patients are generally healthy soldiers and family members with injuries or short term illnesses. Generally not the type who need much of "that" kind of help. If you go into nursing, there will be SOME - but it's really not a big part of the overall job. Actually the worst is suctioning trachs -

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