Job Decisions: What Means The Most To You?

  1. It's not easy when one has multiple job offers. Weighing the Pros and Cons can be a challenge. What is important to you, may not be as important to someone else. Still, it can get interesting....

    Job Decisions:  What Means The Most To You?

    "You're driving how far?"

    "What kind of gas costs do you incur?"

    "Is it worth it?" These are some of the questions I get when I share where I work. I live in the northwest and work in the Twin cities. I drive over 100 miles a day. Doing the job of 3 people on would think I would make more than I do. While my wage isn't bad, it isn't comparable to what others in my role make in the Twin cities at other facilities, nor are my benefits. But there is also a trade-off, less stress, more time to socialize with the residents. I am an older nurse. I don't carry a patient load, so if I need legitimate time off for something unforeseen, (car issue or not feeling well,) it's not a big deal. I can take a Vacation Day or Sick Time. We don't bank our Sick Time and Vacation Time together and call it P.T.O. We separate them. That way the time you earn is protected, depending on the circumstance. While I do have to fight for a parking space almost daily, I also work in an environment that is calm, relaxed and happy. I do not go home exhausted at night and my co-workers are family.

    We care about one another, pray for and, encourage one another. (I know this is where some of you are rolling your eyes...) But, that's me and my job. Not everyone has those preferences. The stress of financial and home obligations have a huge influence on our job choices, let alone the distance. It's especially hard when you are new to nursing and have multiple job offers in various locations.

    You need to weigh what means the most to you. One might consider discreetly speaking with the staff where you are being considered. Are they happy? Are they treated with respect? How's the communication between Management and Staff? Sometimes employers forget that they aren't the only ones who are doing the interviewing.

    Instead of answering the question, "Why do you want to work for us?", you might step out on a limb and cheerfully ask, "Why should I want to work for you?"

    "How does ____________company differ from others in your industry?"

    You need to measure the responsibilities, perks versus drawbacks, the "mood" of the facility and how staff interact before you can really make a sound decision. And be prepared for some push-back if you decide to go somewhere else, especially if they want you.

    Example: I had once applied as a Home Health Nurse for a major reputable entity online.

    The Recruiter sent me the link on which to apply. I clicked on it and began.

    I filled out the application, a very tedious process. Between interruptions and regrouping, it took about 2 hours. I had to save it mid-way through to attend to something important. Upon my return, imagine my shock and dismay to discover that it had vanished! I notified the person who was anticipating its' reception. She encouraged me to try again, which I did.
    I finished it this time, and sent it, holding my breath. Within an hour, I was told it was not received, and the H.R. "couldn't find it." I got a series of communications questioning me as to whether I had even made the attempt. That stuck in my craw. Within seconds I sent a screenshot of what would it would show of the application to prove I actually did fill it out including the job number.

    After a series of emails and texts involving the position I had applied for was in a different location other than the one they had sent to me, I politely requested a phone call so we could clear the air. It did not come. Instead, I was asked to fill the application out again so we could continue the process.

    "I don't think so," I told myself with some annoyance. That was on a Friday. On Monday, I decided that perhaps this wasn't such a good fit for me after all. If the application process was this difficult, what would charting issues be? Now, I know that they are probably not the same program. But really? A huge comglomerate like the one to whom I applied would know by now that their system was flawed and not yet fixed.

    How many other applicants had experienced this?

    I phoned the contact on Monday. Of course I had to leave a voicemail, thanking them for the opportunity, but I had failed to understand why they had sent me a link to apply for a location that was very far away when I lived somewhere else. The position I had applied for was in my town. Within the same hour, I got a reply.

    "Well, " the representative stated, "We know that you have withdrawn your application, but can you just share with us the technical issues you've had?" I explained to her what I had gone through and as I only had about 45 minutes to get to my interview somewhere else, I could not stay on the line.

    "Well," she said, "We just think that there might be a flaw in the system and need some feedback." Was she not listening?

    "I do not wish to be unkind, but I really do need to go."

    "Alright," she said glumly, "I won't hold you up anymore." I felt bad for both of us. But that is one example of "red flags" to watch out for when deciding if a company is a good fit. That was just one instance of how even application circumstances can influence your perception of how things are run in an organization. Of course, the flip-side of that is that there may be wonderful companies out there for whom to work, and their on-boarding process isn't like negotiating a minefield.

    In short, list what means the most important to you, and weigh it with what is ahead. Who knows? In time, you may find an employer that seems the perfect fit. Or, you may find an employer that you can serve for a season, until it is time to move on.

    Above all, enjoy the ride!
    Last edit by tnbutterfly on Jun 14
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    4 Comments

  3. by   xoemmylouox
    I agree. What is important to one person is meaningless to another. Some look at pay and pay alone. I have a younger family and am the breadwinner so I need the whole package to make sense. So I sacrifice a little on pay, but get good 401K, life insurance, and decent health insurance - I'm good. Plus I need a healthy work/life balance. My last job was just about everything I thought I wanted, but I never felt like I had time off. That was a deal breaker (amongst other issues of course).

    Just make sure you think about your goals - the ones of today and of the future. Does your job help you reach those goals or is it just a filler until you get where you need to be.
  4. by   alazzaro
    I drove 45 min each way to a job for lesser pay over continuing to work for a morally and ethically corrupt provider who was 1 mile from where I lived.

    I loved this new job, but after awhile I did not feel the RNs were fairly compensated based on market area, and left after a year for a position closer to home for (bonus!) twice the pay. Although I love my current employer and my position (and my salary), my heart is back at that 45 min away job field. In time, after my kids are grown and I am more financially stable, I will probably go back to that field (not necessarily the employer) as it tends to pay less than acute care.

    Job satisfaction really is my first priority, but i need to feel valued and appropriate compensation is part of that value. This is my second career but I did not switch professions for pay as I made more before. I was looking for something personally rewarding, which I found in nursing.
  5. by   LovingLife123
    I drive 45 minutes each way. I have a hospital closer, but I like my coworkers and my immediate management. I like all the experience I have gained of my unit. My benefits are decent.

    However, I'm extremely disappointed in the corporate management. We were recently bought out with big changes taking place. The atmosphere of the hospital has changed and not for the better. They are cutting right and left. Things are a mess right now. I almost think it's worth it to take on more patients and leave the mess. Then I remember, I really like most of my coworkers.

    So I stay, for now. I could get paid much more somewhere else. I'm hoping by riding out the hiccups it will get better. But I'm from a different generation that values loyalty. I found out that my generation values different things and we apparently have some type of misguided loyalty to employers.
  6. by   Have Nurse
    Quote from alazzaro
    I drove 45 min each way to a job for lesser pay over continuing to work for a morally and ethically corrupt provider who was 1 mile from where I lived.

    I loved this new job, but after awhile I did not feel the RNs were fairly compensated based on market area, and left after a year for a position closer to home for (bonus!) twice the pay. Although I love my current employer and my position (and my salary), my heart is back at that 45 min away job field. In time, after my kids are grown and I am more financially stable, I will probably go back to that field (not necessarily the employer) as it tends to pay less than acute care.

    Job satisfaction really is my first priority, but i need to feel valued and appropriate compensation is part of that value. This is my second career but I did not switch professions for pay as I made more before. I was looking for something personally rewarding, which I found in nursing.
    I can certainly understand that. Even now due to the commute and horrible traffic that has worsened for some reason, I too am looking closer to home and for more pay. Need to think about retirement!

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