Dealing with Stress at Work - page 4

There have been several threads and articles on this subject and I'd like this thread to be an interactive one on methods we've employed that have worked for us!... Read More

  1. by   VivaLasViejas
    When I worked nights, my favorite thing to do after sending my kids off to school was to take a long hot bath in this huge garden tub we had in the master bathroom. Sometimes I fell asleep in there and didn't know it until I slid down and snorfled water up my nose. But it did wonders for my disposition especially when I'd had a bad night. And toward the end of that particular job, almost *all* of them were bad nights.
  2. by   sallyrnrrt
    I've been known, to announce, " I may not be the nurse for you "
  3. by   cardiacfreak
    My stress reliever is sitting in my car singing along with Prince blaring loudly out of my speakers.
  4. by   Orion81RN
    I'm embarrassed to say I punched a door at work once. Had a Pt who was a physician that was a real piece of work. Actually, she wasn't even my patient. I was helping her nurse with her wound care while the entire time the high and mighty M.D kept snapping saying we didn't know what we were doing. One day the perfect storm hit, and I just snapped after walking out of her room. I punched the med room door.....in front of other nurses and CNAs. Yeah....that really happened. To this day I can't believe I did that. But anyhoo, that was last week...

    Jk, a few years ago
  5. by   Racer15
    I got so bad at one point that my director, manager, and CNO, pulled me into the office and told me I was getting help immediately, and had to sign into my own ER, where they deemed me too high risk to go home. My stress had creeped up on my just slowly enough that I didn't realize the pit it had thrown me into until I was a danger to myself. Therapy has been a great help and taught me coping mechanisms. I'm not the only nurse in my ED utilizing regular therapy. It's nice to be able to say whatever you want and vent to a confidential third party!
  6. by   Davey Do
    Thank you all for sharing, and a special thanks to Orion and Racer who shared their sensitive stories. Self-examination and to admit our shortcomings is a difficult thing to do.

    Early in my nursing career, as an LPN, I was complaining of a patient's behavior to an RN. She gave me a perspective that I still use to this day- she said, "Remember: any of these patients could be you. You could be any of these patients. There for the grace of God go I".

    I am better than no one else. No one else is better than me. We are all equals. This concept helps me to deal with the stress of a high maintenance patient. And many times, I can see myself in them, which lessens my frustration and helps to keep me humble.

    These methods of dealing with stress have to be practiced regularly, else I find myself on a high horse invariably to be knocked off. Again.
  7. by   K+MgSO4
    Quote from brandy1017
    I highly recommend getting a massage to deal with shoulder and back stress. They are wonderful, along with a hot bubble bath or a hot tub soak if you have
    I'm a 6 ft tall woman living in Australia. Between my height and permanent water restrictions bubble baths are a concept I have never enjoyed due to an inability to have all parts of me covered by water in a bath 😁

    One of our chronic EDS pt mother is a masseuse who gives the staff 15 min sessions when her son is in. That and some physio helps.
  8. by   Kitiger
    As soon as I realize that I'm tense or irritable, I try to remember when I last ate. Since I work private duty home are, I carry my lunch. Sometimes, the only way to know if I've eaten recently enough is to look in my bag, to see how much food is left for my 10 or 12 hour shift.

    Usually, there's too much left (I forgot to eat earlier). If I eat when I feed my client, I do much better.

    My BMI is 25, yet I forget to eat at work. How do these match?
  9. by   audreysmagic
    Quote from Kitiger
    As soon as I realize that I'm tense or irritable, I try to remember when I last ate.

    My BMI is 25, yet I forget to eat at work. How do these match?
    Oh, I feel you on that! Hangry is a very real thing. But it's so easy to get busy with work and know you should eat, but want to do just one more thing... Self-care is so important in this field, no matter what your specialty.
  10. by   Racer15
    Quote from Davey Do
    Thank you all for sharing, and a special thanks to Orion and Racer who shared their sensitive stories. Self-examination and to admit our shortcomings is a difficult thing to do.

    Early in my nursing career, as an LPN, I was complaining of a patient's behavior to an RN. She gave me a perspective that I still use to this day- she said, "Remember: any of these patients could be you. You could be any of these patients. There for the grace of God go I".

    I am better than no one else. No one else is better than me. We are all equals. This concept helps me to deal with the stress of a high maintenance patient. And many times, I can see myself in them, which lessens my frustration and helps to keep me humble.

    These methods of dealing with stress have to be practiced regularly, else I find myself on a high horse invariably to be knocked off. Again.
    I share my story every chance I get. One of our own ER nurses took her life in September and it tore our little family apart. I sometimes wonder if I had opened up to her about my depression, maybe she would have reached out. I'm here for anyone that wants to talk or just hear my story to know they aren't alone.
  11. by   Davey Do
    Being open to share your story of one who has been in the depths of depression and has transcended that event can show others in despair that the situation can be transcended. How wonderful of you. That transition is a conscious-changing event.

    My heart goes out to you for your and your family's loss, Racer. Losing a close workmate must have been an earth shattering, traumatic experience.

    Having to accept the choices we and others make is a difficult process, also. The philosophy of "We do the very best we can at any given time" helps us to accept the outcome of circumstances.

    Also being open to also allow others to see that they're not alone and availing yourself is a gracious offering, Racer. Thank you.
  12. by   Davey Do
    Last week, my MN shift work wife Eleanor and I were providing care to the patients on geriatric psych at shift change. We received no assistance from the day shift nurses who came on the unit and merely sat in the nurses station, for nearly a half an hour, waiting for report.

    I thought of the old song, "Three Coins in a Fountain".

    3-slugs-png
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am a nurse manager. I know stress, having been a staff nurse 20 years and now this. I also love to eat for comfort, and I gained 45 pounds in 2 years d/t stress.

    Now when I am stressed: I turn the lights low in my office, listen to music while I work, and when it's bad enough for me to possibly take it out on the wrong person, I literally walk outside and do breathing exercises ( I have a great ap on my i-phone that guides meditation and breathing for stress). Only when I am calmer do I step back into the melee.

    Oh and I have lost 50lb in the past year!!!! Eating healthier food, drinking more water and moving has de-stressed my life so much.

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