BYOB at work? - page 3

Need your excellent, expert advice! Recently while at work, it was brought to my attention that another nurse had brought beer FROM HOME and gave it to a vulnerable adult in our Special Care Unit as... Read More

  1. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from Kayauhs
    I LOVE THIS PHOTO!!! Saving it.

    So here's what I did. I snuck outside and made sure this nurse's car was unlocked. Then I grabbed two big bags of fermenting BM and urine filled briefs and I hid them under the nurse's back car seat. Then, I went online and I signed this nurse up for every dating site I could find under titles like, "Sasquatch needs a mate", "Dating in the Himalayans", "The Russian Penninsula is calling you for Love".

    THEN, I registered this nurse for as many political online forums I possibly could and listed the nurse's phone number and requested calls DAY OR NIGHT.

    THEN, I registered the nurse with the Foreign Legion.

    THEN, I caught a wild racoon and turned it loose in the nurse's car.


    I'M TOTALLY JOKING I DIDN'T DO ANY OF THAT.

    I simply wrote it all down as it happened and reported it like I should and then got on with my shift because I was BUSY!!
    I'm glad you didn't do all those things. The song "Dueling Banjos" started playing in my head as I was reading your post.
  2. by   klone
    Quote from Kayauhs
    Maybe next time she decides a little cocaine would be a good thing. Or ? a little something else sprinkled on his cereal. Where does it end?
    Really? You don't think that's a ridiculous, hyperbolic leap?

    Davey, can you do a cartoon on beer being a gateway drug to cocaine?

    Beer is cheap. Cocaine is not (from what I've been told). Who's going to waste perfectly good cocaine on a patient?

    Wait, though - what kind of beer was it? Was it PBR or, like, Fat Tire or Dale's Pale Ale? Because that will definitely factor into my level of outrage.
  3. by   psu_213
    Quote from Kayauhs
    I didn't hear this second hand, after the CNA told me about it I immediately went to investigate what was going on because that is what I am legally required to do in my state. (I'm beginning to really love my state). You assumed that I spoke to my co-workers about this other nurse and used her name. Wrong assumption.
    Sorry for misinterpreting, but how else was I suppose to take this comment other than you were talking to coworkers about the situation:

    "The idea by some of my co-workers that, "Well it was JUST a beer, don't get so excited" really saddens me"?

    Also, you did state that you were taking the CNAs account of how the nurse brought a beer to the resident. You did not witness it, yet you reported. That is basically the definition of secondhand.
  4. by   psu_213
    Quote from klone
    Really? You don't think that's a ridiculous, hyperbolic leap?
    Plus, I though we we talking about legal drugs. Next thing you know, the Nazi's are going to be brining in the beer. Mr. (Dr?) Godwin on line 1.
  5. by   silverbat
    Quote from ruby_jane
    CNA saw it. Let the CNA report it. I think your concern is larger and wider (who brings ANYTHING from home to give to a patient???)
    I once brought thanksgiving dinner to a dying patient with no family who was in the hospital on my floor. I would do it again in that situation.
  6. by   psu_213
    Quote from silverbat
    I once brought thanksgiving dinner to a dying patient with no family who was in the hospital on my floor. I would do it again in that situation.
    Occurred several years ago...we had a pot luck holiday lunch at work. We had a patient who had been on the unit for several months. One of the nurses made a plate of food (from the food we brought from home) for this patient. After the fact, she told one of our NP's about it...never did get a verbal nor written order.
  7. by   nursesunny
    Quote from klone
    No, we didn't miss it; we understand it just fine.
    I laughed when I read this... we are all pretty sure they aren't brewing beer at the nursing home...and yes, all of that was bad and wrong, but this part was funny.
  8. by   ProperlySeasoned
    General Question: Is alcohol allowed or ever provided in long term care? I understand there are a handful of diseases where ETOH is contraindicated. But, for your average LOL who needs to spend her final years in a SNF, is a glass of wine (not provided by the nurse) out of the question? Genuinely curious.
  9. by   caliotter3
    Quote from ProperlySeasoned
    General Question: Is alcohol allowed or ever provided in long term care? I understand there are a handful of diseases where ETOH is contraindicated. But, for your average LOL who needs to spend her final years in a SNF, is a glass of wine (not provided by the nurse) out of the question? Genuinely curious.
    We had residents who had wine or some other alcohol based drink stored in the fridge in the med room, but each one had a valid order from the MD and it was on their care plan. When the resident would pass away and it was forgotten to give the remaining alcohol to the family, some of the nurses would vie for the 'honor' of getting rid of it to make room in the fridge, of course. Not unheard of. As stated before, this is their home. If they have had wine with dinner or a glass before bed for decades, why deprive them at the end of their life? That would seem cruel.
  10. by   Oldmahubbard
    At the LTC facilities where I consult, the majority of the residents have an order for 1 or 2 alcoholic beverages "daily, prn."

    This is meant to accommodate families bringing in a special meal on holidays, for those in long term.

    It is not meant for staff to bring in booze because they feel sorry for the patient, or whatever the strange motivation may be.

    On a related note, dementia secondary to alcohol abuse is much more common than I would have guessed.

    It is a fairly common reason for LTC admission among people in their 50's.

    Food for thought.
  11. by   kbrn2002
    Quote from ProperlySeasoned
    General Question: Is alcohol allowed or ever provided in long term care? I understand there are a handful of diseases where ETOH is contraindicated. But, for your average LOL who needs to spend her final years in a SNF, is a glass of wine (not provided by the nurse) out of the question? Genuinely curious.
    It's perfectly fine. I work in LTC and an alcoholic drink if not if not contraindicated is in our house orders. Our activity department has "happy hour" one day a week from 5-7 pm where a drink is served to those that want one. The activity department buys and serves the beer and wine. We also have a few residents that are accustomed to a daily drink, their families supply the alcohol of choice and we store it in the med room.
  12. by   RNNPICU
    OP:
    I understand that you want to maintain integrity and ensuring patient safety and well being, but you reported second-hand information. Are you 100% certain of the exact account of the CNA. I am not insinuating that the CNA is lying, but you don't know the exact account of what the CNA saw. Additionally, you may not have known the whole story. Also, you stated that you did speak to the nurse who brought the beer, but only after you reported the nurse. Did you ask for clarification about the story? Was there more to the story? Most people are not just going to randomly bring beer just because, there likely is more to the story. Maybe the patient does need an order and no-one has thought about it ye? A nice gentle reminder that, hey, I heard that beer was brought to patient X, don't forget that we really need that MD order as required by our policy or practice standards.
  13. by   CrunchRN
    Super bad judgement by the nurse that brought the beer. However, if the poor resident wants beer then maybe you could do a kindness for the resident and the nurse with poor judgement (but good heart) and advocate for an MD order instead of turning in the nurse. Win for all.

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