"That's a myth about nursing"

  1. I just got off the phone with a young applicant to rent from me. I mentioned that I worked yesterday, so she asked me what I did. She's a college student herself.

    She said, "Oh, wow, that's a busy job! There's always a need for nurses!" I replied that that's a myth about nursing. There's not always a nursing shortage, sometimes it's difficult to get a job. I said that I'm not sure who's responsible for the myth, but that there are a lot of for profit nursing schools that have popped up, and I'm sure they are partially responsible. Unfortunately, the quality of nursing education has gone down with that trend.

    I told her, the need for nurses comes in cycles, just like other sectors of the economy.
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    About Emergent, RN

    Joined: Dec '13; Posts: 2,379; Likes: 17,405

    50 Comments

  3. by   That Guy
    Local news here just stated how there is a shortage of nurses in Colorado and its going to go up and "what the government is doing to help". I have an idea, the hospitals could pay a livable wage for the city they work in. Food for thought.
  4. by   ICUman
    Same. I've seen a lot of commercials recently advertising how needed nurses are in places like Utah and Nevada. And shame on nursing schools for turning away applicants.

    Nothing could be further from the truth. Big time competition for jobs and oversupply.
  5. by   Jedrnurse
    Not just schools. Employers have a vested interest in fostering the over-supply as well.

    "Don't like your job? Buh-bye. There are a few dozen unemployed nurses and/or new grads looking to fill it."
  6. by   That Guy
    Quote from Jedrnurse
    Not just schools. Employers have a vested interest in fostering the over-supply as well.

    "Don't like your job? Buh-bye. There are a few dozen unemployed nurses and/or new grads looking to fill it."
    I understand this model at the same time I dont. The rate at which they hire people in is higher than if you kept the same employee for 10 years and gave them "raises' each year. So why not keep the long term person, pay them less and profit more that way.
  7. by   Jedrnurse
    Quote from That Guy
    I understand this model at the same time I dont. The rate at which they hire people in is higher than if you kept the same employee for 10 years and gave them "raises' each year. So why not keep the long term person, pay them less and profit more that way.
    It's not just the pay. Institutional benefits get cut more and more. Management doesn't want old-timers around who remember when "the hospital used to (fill in the blank)" or also folks who might remember better staffing...
  8. by   Daisy4RN
    Quote from Jedrnurse
    It's not just the pay. Institutional benefits get cut more and more. Management doesn't want old-timers around who remember when "the hospital used to (fill in the blank)" or also folks who might remember better staffing...
    Management also doesn't like old-timers who remember what the hospital did not used to do. And I think if there are any shortages it is mostly bedside nurse positions, which of course could be easily fixed if management chose to do that!
  9. by   TruvyNurse
    In my city, there is actually a huge demand for nurses. Nurses are being lost left and right to the nearby Childrens Hospital and the VA. No one wants to work in the smaller clinics, smaller hospitals or nursing homes so they are offering insane sign on bonuses and travel compensation. I think it just depends where you are if the shortage is myth of fact
  10. by   broughden
    Quote from That Guy
    Local news here just stated how there is a shortage of nurses in Colorado and its going to go up and "what the government is doing to help". I have an idea, the hospitals could pay a livable wage for the city they work in. Food for thought.
    I read the same Denver news article. Also mentions how Florida has a glut due to allowing all the shady for profit schools to operate in the state.
  11. by   not.done.yet
    Big medicine is big business. They would like nothing more than for the market to get oversaturated with qualified nursing applicants, thus driving down wages.

    There isn't a shortage of nurses. There is a shortage of nurses willing to work under current bedside nursing conditions.
  12. by   cleback
    I think it's relative to the profession. I mean, I have my MPH now so I look for other jobs I may qualify for, specially in epidemiology. Nursing positions outnumber epidemiology positions 10:1, probably more. While I agree that the market isn't as rosey as the nursing schools would say, particularly for inexperienced nurses, it's quite a bit more robust than other professional markets.
  13. by   Ddestiny
    Out here in Kansas we are hurting for nurses in all specialties. Hospital, LTC, home health, outpatient clinics... I've started seeing a resurgence of the sign-on bonuses that vanished after 2008. A new grad isn't guaranteed their favorite specialty but it's very easy to get a job. The BON sells our info (bleh) so it's common to get mail from recruiters, too.
  14. by   klone
    Quote from That Guy
    Local news here just stated how there is a shortage of nurses in Colorado and its going to go up and "what the government is doing to help". I have an idea, the hospitals could pay a livable wage for the city they work in. Food for thought.
    We're thinking about moving back in the next couple years, and I'm struck again at how poor the wages are there, compared to COL.

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