Failed out of RN program completely, what now?

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by Lynker Lynker, LPN Member Nurse Student

Specializes in Family Primary Care, LTC, Rehab. Has 3 years experience.

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I'm sure a few of you know who I am, but I went back to complete my RN after failing the third semester. Well, today I just failed my final in the last semester and I'm out of the school completely. All I'm leaving with is an Associates in Science, no RN with it.

I'm utterly heartbroken. I decided I'm just going to work as an LPN for awhile longer and maybe go back to school down the line instead of throwing myself back into school so soon again.

Does anyone have any words of wisdom? I'm so heartbroken and hurt from all this. I was so close....but ended up failing right at the very end.

londonflo

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 45 years experience. 1,939 Posts

I don't have any words of wisdom but you have added  further nursing education to your LPN base. Think about who that benefits...your practice for others and most of all for you!  Education is never wasted...You are made of sterner stuff because you tried. 

Davey Do

Specializes in Psych (25 years), Medical (15 years). Has 43 years experience. 1 Article; 9,920 Posts

I've known a couple LPNs who couldn't pass the RN program or NCLEX and were really good nurses. Both just bit the bullet, persevered, and eventually became RNs.

I was an LPN for 7 years prior to getting my RN and let me tell you, Lynker, it was a *****! I graduated from the RN program and in the months before the state boards, studied with three state board study booklets that included mock tests, and couldn't score higher than 70% on any of them!

I had a profound revelation that I was answering the questions with what I believed, but not what they wanted. When I began to answer the questions with what I believed they wanted, I did well and had no problem passing the boards.

I've heard a few tales of other LPNs having difficulty transitioning within the RN program, so you're not alone.

Good luck and the best to you, Lynker!

Dani_Mila, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Subacute Rehab, Geriatrics, LTC, Psych, Hospice. Has 4 years experience. 376 Posts

I would probably do some self-evaluation and ask myself why I failed the first and second time. Sometimes, you know why and you have the answer to that question. I would suggest to never give up. I would probably step back for a little bit, work as an LPN and study day by day (re-read you notes, do NCLEX questions) and re-apply to another school if applicable. If you can go back to that same school, then that would be good but maybe you need change, sometimes it is not you, but the program/instructors itself. I failed first semester of nursing school, I was grateful enough that my school was able to let me re-enter. I found a good group of people that I studied with, this makes a huge difference. I started with a study group and knew that their way of studying is not effective for me ( they rely on me to take initiative), so I looked for and found a different group that became my nursing buddies to this day. I failed my NCLEX first time and knew I need to change my ways of studying. Sometimes you need to do some re-evaluation in order to make a plan, what work and what didn't work? Plan it out. Do not do the same mistakes that you did before because though habits will be just pitfalls for failure.

Lynker, LPN

Specializes in Family Primary Care, LTC, Rehab. Has 3 years experience. 237 Posts

Thank you so much, everyone for your feedback. I know a lot of it was my own downfalls. I have a referral from my psychiatrist to be evaluated by a psychologist for a possible learning disability. I also think a new, more fair school would be helpful. I'm not going to state what happened at this school, but they had VERY shady practices.

I won't give up. I might just take the next year to work and build up my resume. 🙂

Wlaurie

Wlaurie, RN

162 Posts

We had 3 LPNs join our class for the RN section. I think 2 failed. The main cause I believe based on being with them and talking with them is twofold. One, they were working full-time as LPNs that required a lot of their time and two, they had been out of school long enough that it was hard to get back into the demanding studying, testing and clinical frame of mind. I think it can be done, but I think they underestimated the commitment.  Maybe some of that was they were already nurses and thought they wouldn't have to study as much, but I don't know. Anyway, hope you don't give up. Take time to analyze what went wrong and attack it again.

No Stars In My Eyes

Specializes in Med nurse in med-surg., float, HH, and PDN. Has 43 years experience. 2,970 Posts

Just as a way of re-framing for you ... it just may be that maybe something better is coming your way, that you might not have been able to take advantage of, if you'd whizzed through the schooling first time around. 

Don't 'dump' on yourself, and keep your heart open to a surprise occurrence that will have you on a happier path.

ERArmyRNND

ERArmyRNND

Specializes in ER. Has 11 years experience. 27 Posts

We all fail at something. Use it as a learning experience. Failing and then coming back and trying again gives us grit. don't take it personally, just figure out what you didn't put enough time or energy into and come back and hit it hard when you are ready. When I fail at something, I come back and overkill it so it doesn't happen again. In other words go for the A not just the pass and most likely you will succeed.

HiddenAngels

HiddenAngels

Has 8 years experience. 351 Posts

True, what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.  Turn that sadness and anger into motivation. It’s circumstantial and it’s already in the past, think about what you can do with what you have and keep going forward.

CommunityRNBSN

CommunityRNBSN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community health. Has 4 years experience. 801 Posts

On 5/20/2022 at 1:04 PM, Lynker said:

 I'm not going to state what happened at this school, but they had VERY shady practices.

Maybe this is true, maybe it's just your perception-- but either way, definitely don't allow that to be the "explanation" in your mind.  I hope my tone doesn't come across like I'm being harsh but, realistically, most of the students in your class graduated.  So the problem isn't JUST the school itself.

I think taking some time for yourself after this is a great idea!  Also be sure you REALLY think through whether you want to try again.  You certainly don't have to.  You can have a long career as an LPN, or you could even decide to do some other field entirely, outside of healthcare!  Don't feel like you have to pursue RN just because everyone else seems to be doing it.

londonflo

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 45 years experience. 1,939 Posts

On 5/17/2022 at 6:27 PM, londonflo said:

Think about who that benefits...your practice for others and most of all for you!  

I wanted to add onto this. When I was teaching, we had an LPN to RN student complete the program but after 4-5 tries not pass boards. I said to the director "may be we made a better LPN" but the director said "you always look on the bright side". I recently saw that this LPN is now in a great out-patient job. Through her RN education, she made herself better. She was able to move to many jobs because she was an LPN that was proficient and skilled.. Her daughter is now an RN. Education can be a great benefit to your repertoire of nursing skills. 

I am assuming you had to complete A & P, Micro for your program. What learning skills helped you then? You succeeded in these difficult science courses. 

On 5/20/2022 at 12:04 PM, Lynker said:

I have a referral from my psychiatrist to be evaluated by a psychologist for a possible learning disability

This is very good news. Best wishes on this avenue to help with your learning skills. 

On 5/20/2022 at 12:04 PM, Lynker said:

I know a lot of it was my own downfalls.

You will not know this until you get evaluated for your learning skills or difficulty with. 

CommunityRNBSN

CommunityRNBSN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community health. Has 4 years experience. 801 Posts

1 hour ago, londonflo said:

. I recently saw that this LPN is now in a great out-patient job. Through her RN education, she made herself better. She was able to move to many jobs because she was an LPN that was proficient and skilled.. Her daughter is now an RN. 

I loved this story!  Also, she must be so proud that her daughter wanted to follow in her footsteps and be a nurse.