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Exit interview survey, tell the truth, lie or ignore

Nurses   (2,215 Views 47 Comments)
by Forest2 Forest2 (Member)

2,253 Visitors; 437 Posts

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2,253 Visitors; 437 Posts

12 hours ago, Kooky Korky said:

It's an awful idea.  Don't answer it at all.  The only likely result will be you worrying about it after the fact.  And maybe getting a bad reference from them in the future.

If you do answer it, say what a wonderful privilege it was to work there, how proud you are to have been a part of the team there, and how much you grew professionally.  (So why leave?  Why are you leaving?)  Best of luck.

It was bad, I won't give the details, but it was bad.  My conscience would not let me stay.

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JackChase1212 has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Surgery.

419 Visitors; 34 Posts

On 7/9/2019 at 8:13 AM, Forest2 said:

so far more "No's" than "Yes's".  I would like to answer it with brutal honesty, but I don't think it's a good idea.  I mean I don't think they'd appreciate the truth.  Easier to pretend and not see what is really going on instead of actually doing something about it.

You answered your own question. 

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FolksBtrippin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

1 Follower; 13,534 Visitors; 1,534 Posts

I chose to be as honest as I could. In truth, my feelings were so strong that it was hard to be objective.

I knew I would not receive a negative review. The company only reports your start date, end date, and eligibility for rehire. You are eligible for rehire if you give sufficient notice. So I was good on that end. 

But I don't feel like my feedback did any good. It would have been nice had my manager been disciplined or somehow corrected for abusing the charge nurse. I don't think that happened. I guess it could have, but I doubt it.

I feel like it just doesn't matter. Do what makes you feel most comfortable and secure. It's not going to make a difference either way.

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

45,489 Visitors; 5,040 Posts

Part of this post hit a raw nerve with me. I was recently hospitalized & then rehab. It was the worst experience of my life and even surpassed a major MVA. Even 4 months later, I still have so much anger that I still fume, so to contact the involved parties would be useless as I would be just spitting vitriol and no one would listen to that anyway. When I calm down enough, I will address the issues with every entity that I believe would be interested. (And I assure you, I will be going up a VERY tall ladder to get to the top!)

So I deeply understand the desire of OP (and others in similar situations) to want to vent in hopes of effecting positive change. That desire arises from our commitment to pt advocacy and professional practice.  Altruistic, maybe.

But like so many other posters here have commented, such venting would most likely fall on deaf ears despite the possibly positive outcomes.

Best not to shake up the status quo. Self preservation comes first.

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Alex_RN has 3 years experience.

3,736 Visitors; 322 Posts

As someone else said earlier, if an employer really cared and really intended to take action, they would look after their existing staff.

It is not my job, especially as I am walking out the door forever, to be a learning experience for my facility's management.

Healthcare is a small world, even in a big city, and you never know what will come back and bite you in the behind down the road.

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kbrn2002 has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Geriatrics.

28,878 Visitors; 2,885 Posts

In my opinion an honest exit interview might make you feel better, but it won't accomplish a darn thing so why bother risking it? If the company you are leaving is oblivious enough to allow such an awful work environment in the first place telling them it's awful won't change it.

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

45,489 Visitors; 5,040 Posts

44 minutes ago, kbrn2002 said:

In my opinion an honest exit interview might make you feel better, but it won't accomplish a darn thing so why bother risking it? If the company you are leaving is oblivious enough to allow such an awful work environment in the first place telling them it's awful won't change it.

Amen!

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2,021 Visitors; 67 Posts

I have always answered my exit interviews honestly and professionally.  I don't know if it ever helped, but feel better for being honest and it also helped me get some stuff off my chest so to speak.

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2,253 Visitors; 437 Posts

3 hours ago, kbrn2002 said:

In my opinion an honest exit interview might make you feel better, but it won't accomplish a darn thing so why bother risking it? If the company you are leaving is oblivious enough to allow such an awful work environment in the first place telling them it's awful won't change it.

That is a good way to put it.  I can't believe that they don't know what is going on, yet, if they know then I can't believe they aren't doing something about it. It's either denial, ignorance, avoidance, or apathy or who knows what. 

I tried but couldn't make myself do it their way. I may not be "in love" with nursing but I certainly won't stay where I can't be proud of the job I do.  

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247 Visitors; 6 Posts

I've only ever done one and it was in person with HR. I was trying to get out of having to pay for breaking my contract (2 year New grad terrible hospital) I said nothing of what was truth or how awful it was. 

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Orca has 24 years experience as a ADN, ASN, RN and specializes in Corrections, psychiatry, rehab, LTC.

1 Follower; 25,974 Visitors; 1,784 Posts

I had a nurse manager who set me up to fail, and then she forced me out. She was a personal friend of the CNO. I still saw this as my last shot to set the record straight, and to let the CNO know that a number of other people were contemplating leaving (six nurses asked me for a letter of reference) due to the behavior of this nurse manager.

I have no idea what, if anything, that they did with the information that I gave them, but they can't say that they were unaware.

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