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Do Bachelor's Degrees Save Lives? - The Facts about Earning a BSN

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In most lines of work, there’s one clear path to getting your foot in the door. But nursing is unique in that it offers multiple paths to entry-level positions. Whether you’ve earned a diploma, an associate degree or a bachelor’s degree, you know there is more than one way to become an RN. You are reading page 7 of Do Bachelor's Degrees Save Lives? - The Facts about Earning a BSN. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Spuen has 5 years experience.

1,497 Visitors; 48 Posts

I wish that was the case here. Exams are on any computer anywhere. You just need to finish it in certain time limit. I ended up getting a C- in two classes and booted from the program.

Thankfuly Ive found a hospital with an in person BSN program running in cooperation with a local university. Im hoping to do much better.

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SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

2 Followers; 64,834 Visitors; 19,548 Posts

Nope, nothing self-serving about this article here.

Come, on, now.

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Tenebrae has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Primary Health, Gerontology, Palliative.

1 Article; 10,502 Visitors; 1,411 Posts

Hmm...I wonder why Rasmussen College is pushing for this.

I reckon there might be about 47000 reasons why:yes:

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1,692 Visitors; 67 Posts

Do you have numbers and statistics on this information? If not, it's merely opinion.

I personally don't know a single BSN prepared nurse who did not pass on the first time they took the NCLEX.

Just going with personal experience

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lifelearningrn has 4 years experience as a RN and specializes in School Nursing.

24,491 Visitors; 2,262 Posts

An ADN with 20+ years under his or her belt should be grandfathered from this policy. JMO

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1 Article; 14,360 Visitors; 1,509 Posts

An ADN with 20+ years under his or her belt should be grandfathered from this policy. JMO

In the area I live, BSN is already pretty much the desired entrance degree. Living very close to a major city with some of the best hospitals in the nation competition is high among graduating nurses.

Hospitals usually require the BSN , some will be ok with ADN if the area is under-served or very specialized.

A lot of employers who push for the BSN also offer some collaboration with different colleges, some offer onsite classes that are convenient and affordable.

Having said that - I also know a lot of nurses who are in their 50s or older and do not consider going back to school because they do not have the desire to spend time and money in school, cannot afford it, or have been out of school for such a long time that they do not think they would be able to catch up with technology and APA.

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TriciaJ has 37 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

10 Followers; 33,136 Visitors; 3,171 Posts

In the area I live, BSN is already pretty much the desired entrance degree. Living very close to a major city with some of the best hospitals in the nation competition is high among graduating nurses.

Hospitals usually require the BSN , some will be ok with ADN if the area is under-served or very specialized.

A lot of employers who push for the BSN also offer some collaboration with different colleges, some offer onsite classes that are convenient and affordable.

Having said that - I also know a lot of nurses who are in their 50s or older and do not consider going back to school because they do not have the desire to spend time and money in school, cannot afford it, or have been out of school for such a long time that they do not think they would be able to catch up with technology and APA.

It's just not cost-effective for many of us. We wouldn't benefit, and contrary to propaganda, neither would our employers or patients.

Anyone notice the irony between requiring degrees and providing scripted responses? Maybe hospitals should require a BFA instead of a BSN.

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Dogen has 1 years experience and specializes in Behavioral Health.

11,665 Visitors; 897 Posts

If I folded my diploma over three or four times I could probably make a pressure dressing out of it and save a life with it. So, in answer to OP's question, yes, but only if you get a bad cut in the vicinity of my garage.

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1 Follower; 44,514 Visitors; 3,044 Posts

I have an AS degree. I took classes to obtain my BSN but dropped out. As others have posted, nursing theory, the history of nursing, etc., did not make be a better acute care bedside nurse.

I have had a variety of jobs and opportunities, including nursing administration, because I was always willing to float.

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7,973 Visitors; 516 Posts

The problem, I believe, is that people think the only good nurses are bedside nurses. If that's what you want to do, then fine, do that but don't tell the rest of us looking at specializing in other areas away from bedside that a BSN, MSN or DNP doesn't make you a better nurse, because it certainly DOES. It may not make you a better "bedside" nurse but that is not the point.

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TriciaJ has 37 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

10 Followers; 33,136 Visitors; 3,171 Posts

The problem, I believe, is that people think the only good nurses are bedside nurses. If that's what you want to do, then fine, do that but don't tell the rest of us looking at specializing in other areas away from bedside that a BSN, MSN or DNP doesn't make you a better nurse, because it certainly DOES. It may not make you a better "bedside" nurse but that is not the point.

Actually it is the point because we keep being told the patient in bed will have a better outcome if his hands-on nurse has a bachelor's degree. But we're not actually seeing that. Many good reasons to get a degree, but that is not one of them.

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Tenebrae has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Primary Health, Gerontology, Palliative.

1 Article; 10,502 Visitors; 1,411 Posts

In my BSN we had a large majority of classes that I've never used once in the three years since I graduated and registered.

My final year cultural safety paper was taught by one of the most culturally unsafe nurses I've ever met.

At least where we are, what sparked the move to the BSN training was that in the hospital program student nurses were being chucked in at the deep end and failing badly. However in the opinion of alot of the nurses training has gone too far into the theoretical now and missing much of the needed practical stuff.

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