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Dismissed from a Nursing Program (Need Advice)

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by nursing123 nursing123 (New) New Student

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Recently, I have been academically dismissed from a ABSN program due to failing two classes my first semester.  I accept full responsibility for my failures and I know what I did wrong to reach this point. I am currently going through the appeals process with my school, but it is seeming very unlikely that I will be re-admitted.  I have been looking for other schools that may accept dismissed students, but my options are limited.  I refuse to give up on my journey of becoming a nurse, but I am feeling extremely defeated and am asking for advice on what my options are.  I am wondering if anyone has been through this and were able to get into another school? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you.

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juniper222 specializes in Pre Nursing.

137 Posts; 402 Profile Views

Some options might be ...

  1. get your CNA cert and work as a CNA till you formulate a plan.
  2. change your major to another medical related field such as MA.
  3. seek out the school counsellor for advice.
  4. apply at a different school.

I know things seem impossible right now, but if you are determined enough you can make it work.  Check out this thread 

  Good luck.

Edited by juniper222

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1 Follower; 130 Posts; 797 Profile Views

Try applying for an ADN program, not as fast as an ABSN but not as expensive either! Most RN-BSN bridges are online and can be obtained in 8 months -1 year, so still less than a full 4 year BSN route. 

If I were in your situation, I would apply to ADN and ABSN tracks to up the chances of getting accepted by the next cycle with as little gap as possible. 

You can do it, good luck!

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FolksBtrippin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

3 Followers; 1,678 Posts; 14,911 Profile Views

The most important thing is to really and truly understand what went wrong so that you don't repeat the mistake. Usually this takes time and reflection. It's usually not the best idea to get right back in the saddle, because it will take time to make the changes you need to make to be successful.

Were you working full time or part time? Were you taking care of a toddler? What were the contributing factors to your failure? You  either need to change your life before you go back to school, or you need to change your attitude before you go back, and either way, it will take time. 

Your obstacle is not really getting into another program. 

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Nurse SMS has 9 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

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16 hours ago, babysplash said:

Try applying for an ADN program, not as fast as an ABSN but not as expensive either! Most RN-BSN bridges are online and can be obtained in 8 months -1 year, so still less than a full 4 year BSN route. 

If I were in your situation, I would apply to ADN and ABSN tracks to up the chances of getting accepted by the next cycle with as little gap as possible. 

You can do it, good luck!

ADN programs are more competitive than ABSN or BSN programs, not less, due to their reduced time to graduation and reduced cost without much, if any, reduction in expected pay. It is very unlikely the OP would get in.

You might consider earning your LVN, then doing an LVN to RN bridge and go from there. Good luck!

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282 Posts; 8,714 Profile Views

I’ve been in your shoes. I failed 2 nursing courses and was dismissed 6 years ago and now I came back to that same school and repeated those failed nursing courses as well as the courses I did pass due to them being expired. It has worked in my favor since I’ve done better by a long shot. They will mostly likely deny your appeal because I’ve tried that 6 years ago when I tried to repeat the following semester. Also, note if your school has a nursing handbook. My nursing school used to say you can come back in 5 years but now they revised it so that you can come back in 3 years.

If anything, your best chance is through a private school like mine. I’ve been denied through most community colleges and only 1 community college barely accepted me which I ended up declining so I ended up at the school that I failed out of. Private schools just want your money so I feel like they accept people for that reason plus they would have to start over from semester 1 which is more money for them.

Edited by Nursing pursuit

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9 hours ago, Nurse SMS said:

ADN programs are more competitive than ABSN or BSN programs, not less, due to their reduced time to graduation and reduced cost without much, if any, reduction in expected pay. It is very unlikely the OP would get in.

You might consider earning your LVN, then doing an LVN to RN bridge and go from there. Good luck!

All nursing programs are competitive but you can still get in, people fail and switch schools all the time.  Applying to the ADN and LVN programs may be a great option for you.  Ask for an informational interview with the dean, make a great impression, and get some advice ( just to feel them out).  Best wishes🌈.

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Been there, here is what I did. I applied at my local community college that had RN program. Got in and excelled. Obtained job in hospital and enrolled in RN to BSN online school while working full time.  Much easier because you are a RN and the BSN courses are very similar to the community college RN classes.  I recently started Masters online and it’s, so far, a rehash of the ADN and BSN classes. 

Need to focus on your strength and weakness as far as being a student and get that ADN (or ASN, which ever your community college offers). BSN and Masters is easier because they are pretty much a repeat. 

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vampiregirl has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

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On 12/24/2019 at 11:53 AM, Nursing pursuit said:

Private schools just want your money so I feel like they accept people for that reason plus they would have to start over from semester 1 which is more money for them.

I'm sure there are some private schools like this. However there are some fantastic private schools as well. Some private schools are reasonably priced and are very supportive for their student's success... if the student is willing to work hard. I would encourage you to talk to some nurses you know and respect to find out about their school experiences. Who knows... you may find a school that accepts you and that is a good "fit" for you. 

When I first went to college, I did terrible (failed out) at a big well known public university. Years later I graduated Summa Cum Laude from a private college. I put a lot of effort into my studies and it paid off. 

Edited by vampiregirl

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On 12/24/2019 at 7:22 AM, Nurse SMS said:

ADN programs are more competitive than ABSN or BSN programs, not less, due to their reduced time to graduation and reduced cost without much, if any, reduction in expected pay. It is very unlikely the OP would get in.

You might consider earning your LVN, then doing an LVN to RN bridge and go from there. Good luck!

I didn't say it was less competitive - all paths will be competitive, that's just part of the admissions process.  I only mentioned it because if they want to increase the odds of them getting accepted to a program, they should apply to more programs, the odds will be in their favor.

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Like someone commented previously, it is a good idea to get your CNA certificate. You may be able to bypass going to CNA school as you have a semester of nursing school. Getting your CNA allows you to work with nurses and it is also proactive. If you're unable to use your transcript, you can go to a school (which preferably take no more than 4-6 weeks).

I also agree with another person who said to try and get into an ADN/ASN program. It's also less expensive and probably not as rigorous as a one year ABSN program.

I don't really think an MA school will be a good move unless there is a place that hires MA's in your area. You are better off going into an LVN/LPN program. The only problem with the LVN/LPN program is it tends to be pricey in a private school and if you ultimately want to be an RN, you can do without being an LVN/LPN first.

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