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CNN: Abortion Performed on Wrong Woman

Posted

Has 5 years experience.

According to South Korean news agency, a pregnant patient with a 6-week-old fetus had gone to a clinic in the country's capital Seoul. A mix-up in medical charts and failure to check her identity led to the mistaken abortion.

The patient was supposed to receive a nutritional shot at the clinic. The nurse had allegedly injected her with anesthesia without confirming her identity, and the doctor had performed the abortion without checking her identity either.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/24/asia/korea-wrong-abortion-intl-hnk-scli/index.html

Edited by Alex_RN

Rates right up there, higher if you will, because of the loss of an innocent life, with the cardiologist who can’t bother to check the chart before he enters the room and has no idea he already performed an angiogram. No wonder the cardiac event surrounding all of this doesn’t result in a diagnosis. The insurance companies can’t pay too much for the public’s trust it seems.

SmilingBluEyes

Has 20 years experience.

So no time-out? this is horrible.

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 27 years experience.

34 minutes ago, SmilingBluEyes said:

So no time-out? this is horrible.

Definitely horrible. But this is in another country. Not sure what Korean standards are. 😥

I realize this event happened in another country but isn't it a basic thing for nurses and doctors everywhere to at least ask a person his or her name?? One question would have prevented this. One question from anyone!

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 27 years experience.

13 hours ago, Waiting for Retirement said:

I realize this event happened in another country but isn't it a basic thing for nurses and doctors everywhere to at least ask a person his or her name?? One question would have prevented this. One question from anyone!

Again, not sure what Korean standards are. I'd like to think that they'd ask, or that the patient would ask where she's being taken, but cultures are definitely different

On 6/17/2020 at 8:56 PM, Hoosier_RN said:

Again, not sure what Korean standards are. I'd like to think that they'd ask, or that the patient would ask where she's being taken, but cultures are definitely different

True, I definitely understand there are cultural differences. I am just incredulous that what seems to be a basic nursing or medical question---"who are you?" was left out of this equation.

Standards of care naturally vary. This seems out of whack even allowing for that.

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 27 years experience.

1 hour ago, Waiting for Retirement said:

True, I definitely understand there are cultural differences. I am just incredulous that what seems to be a basic nursing or medical question---"who are you?" was left out of this equation.

Standards of care naturally vary. This seems out of whack even allowing for that.

My other thought, as this was South Korea, they are government run health, and possibly a "do as you're told model"

Devastating. Something as simple as checking a name would have taken little to no time to prevent all this heartache.

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience.

On 6/19/2020 at 11:39 AM, Hoosier_RN said:

My other thought, as this was South Korea, they are government run health, and possibly a "do as you're told model"

What in the world does "government run" mean here? Are you implying that a "government run" facility like the VA or a NYC HHC abandons all standards? This is SOUTH Korea, not the North.

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 27 years experience.

36 minutes ago, Undercat said:

What in the world does "government run" mean here? Are you implying that a "government run" facility like the VA or a NYC HHC abandons all standards? This is SOUTH Korea, not the North.

Asian countries and their brand of socialized medicine are very different than VA or western style. I was stationed in South Korea and the culture is a whole different mindset. As an American, it was hard to wrap my mind around. This is the point of view that I put out there. Do I know for a fact this is how/what happened? No. Is it a possibility? Yes

And as far as it goes, I've seen some really dog turd things happen in VA facilities as well, since I do partake of their services, as well as it occasionally gets reported on the news

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience.

19 minutes ago, Hoosier_RN said:

Asian countries and their brand of socialized medicine are very different than VA or western style. I was stationed in South Korea and the culture is a whole different mindset. As an American, it was hard to wrap my mind around. This is the point of view that I put out there. Do I know for a fact this is how/what happened? No. Is it a possibility? Yes

And as far as it goes, I've seen some really dog turd things happen in VA facilities as well, since I do partake of their services, as well as it occasionally gets reported on the news

Thank you. Very interesting perspective. Do we have anything quantitative re: errors in the VA vs. other teaching hospitals?

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis. Has 27 years experience.

Errors happen in every healthcare setting, to varying degrees. Thus sentinel events and reporting, etc. Also, ambulance chasing lawyers...

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience.

19 hours ago, Hoosier_RN said:

Errors happen in every healthcare setting, to varying degrees. Thus sentinel events and reporting, etc. Also, ambulance chasing lawyers...

Well, fer sure they happen everywhere but not identifying the patient is not one seen wherever one lives. Wrong side of the head craniotomies still happen despite time outs (I don't believe they've made any significant difference) because people are in denial about their ability to make an error and we work in super rushed mode all day).

I hope I am not breaking any TOS here. If I am I apologise in advance.

I will be frank about what SK does, read at your own choice, it is a little disturbing. (When I first learned about this year's ago I refused to believe it, it was so unimaginable , I couldn't really wrap my head around it.

..

They eat cats and dogs as festive food in SK and other countries around it.

I personally boycott all countries who decide that skinning cats and dogs alive and boiling them alive is just.

Yes we do the same with lobsters! (I know we are not perfect, I and PETA are working at it).

I'm not a vegetarian, but skinning animals alive and throwing them in hot water while still alive, that's cruelty. That's not consuming animals , as an animal would "consume" you if you were in their path/on their menu. There is a difference.

Why do you expect they actually care about human life of they can't respect animal life?

Mute point.

Edited by NewRN'16

Undercat, BSN, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in Retired. Has 41 years experience.

I don't believe this and cannot find any evidence online that this practice exists in SK. I believe it is probably political propaganda by their enemies. Eating a dog is very different from skinning a live animal.

I wonder what prudent nurses in ROK think when they read that here in the US we do things like inject a nearly-well patient with vecuronium and then walk away while they die.

This OP story is tragic. We here should just use extreme caution in wondering what it is about those other people over there in that weird/unfamiliar country that made it happen.

The wrongly-performed abortion is disturbing as a single tragic incident, and this thread is also disturbing.