Can I work with specialist as FNP or should I pursue AGNP

Posted
by rearviewmirror rearviewmirror, BSN, RN Member Nurse

Specializes in ER.

Hello sirs and madams. I know this is quite frequented topic by aspiring NPs so I had to ask. I am a RN in Dallas TX and made decision to pursue NP, but unsure which specialty will fit my goal the most.

I prioritize my family, so I don't want to work 50-60 hrs and some more, though I can if required. I will be happy with 40hrs and quality time with my wife and kids, so I am fine with outpatient, but I also want to work with procedural specialists such as orthopedic and do preop/postop, assessment, etc instead of primary care settings like family clinic.

With posts concerning FNP saturation and what have you, would pursing more specialized AGNP be better suited for my career preference, or would FNP be fine and better due to higher versatility? Thank you.

djmatte

djmatte, ADN, MSN, RN, NP

Has 7 years experience. 1,154 Posts

AGNP won't be better or worse than an FNP education. There's nothing about either that would be inhibitory to working in a specialty. The only concern is with specialties that require hospital work. Both FNP and AGNP degrees are primary care-focused...so you MAY need an acute care for consensus model states if your chosen specialty needs you to take care of their patients in an acute setting.

guest416560

guest416560

357 Posts

If you want to work in ortho I'd recommend going the PA route. You can work in ortho as a FNP or AGNP but it's doubtful you would get any training experience while in school. You would have to find an orthopod willing to train you on the job. Most of the non MD/DOs that i know of who work in orthopedics are PAs.

rearviewmirror

rearviewmirror, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. 231 Posts

Thank you for the replies. I would pursue PA but of course finaiancally and from time perspective, NP makes more practical sense. On top of that, my goal isn't being in the OR assisting surgeon, but more like working outpatient basis for better work life balance.

It's a catch 22 situation for me: I don't want to pursue FNP because I am not interested in women's health or peds, rather want to work with mainly adults, plus the AGNP being more specific that may help in equipping me for the population I want and make me more "marketable," but also FNP being more versatile and able to broaden the options.

djmatte

djmatte, ADN, MSN, RN, NP

Has 7 years experience. 1,154 Posts

Thank you for the replies. I would pursue PA but of course finaiancally and from time perspective, NP makes more practical sense. On top of that, my goal isn't being in the OR assisting surgeon, but more like working outpatient basis for better work life balance.

It's a catch 22 situation for me: I don't want to pursue FNP because I am not interested in women's health or peds, rather want to work with mainly adults, plus the AGNP being more specific that may help in equipping me for the population I want and make me more "marketable," but also FNP being more versatile and able to broaden the options.

If you don't want to work with peds or wh, then absolutely go agnp. Not gonna lie, but there's few things more frustrating in clinical practice where people start throwing down what populations they will or won't see based on their whims when their training is on something broader.

Bumex

Bumex, DNP, NP

Specializes in Assistant Professor, Nephrology, Internal Medicine. Has 12 years experience. 1 Article; 384 Posts

Im an AGNP and got my current NP job over FNPs partially because all of my hours were in internal medicine. I now do nephrology with some internal medicine.

bbcewalters

bbcewalters, NP

Specializes in NP, ICU, ED, Pre-op. Has 12 years experience. 178 Posts

You may find working in sub acute rehab is what you like. This is what I do and it is a great balance between inpatient and outpatient. I manage chronic disease with some acute exacerbations all while allowing the patient to participate in rehab. No kids at my facility most are > 65 as medicare will pay 100% for the first 20 days.

Good Luck and I agree with previous posters, if you don't want children or women's health, don't go the FNP route.

irvine123

irvine123

55 Posts

Which school do you recommend for the AGNP?

Bumex

Bumex, DNP, NP

Specializes in Assistant Professor, Nephrology, Internal Medicine. Has 12 years experience. 1 Article; 384 Posts

I went to university of Cincinnati. Would 100% recommend that program.

db2xs

db2xs

733 Posts

You should do what you want to do the most. As an RN I jumped into a specialty despite everyone telling me "You have to start off in med-surg" (which is not true). As an NP student I took the AGNP route because I knew I did not want to work with women or children, and despite everyone telling me, "An FNP gives you much more flexibility."

Spadeforce

Spadeforce

Has 1 years experience. 191 Posts

On 1/19/2019 at 1:28 AM, db2xs said:

You should do what you want to do the most. As an RN I jumped into a specialty despite everyone telling me "You have to start off in med-surg" (which is not true). As an NP student I took the AGNP route because I knew I did not want to work with women or children, and despite everyone telling me, "An FNP gives you much more flexibility."

i remember when they told us in RN school to work medsurg before ICU.

dumbest thing ever if anything working med surg makes you dumber

Dodongo

Dodongo, APRN, NP

Has 7 years experience. 793 Posts

FNP flexibility, versatility and opportunity is a facade. You are far more marketable pursuing the specialty education aimed at the population and specialty in which you want to work. All things being equal, a FNP will never beat out a ACNP applying for an inpatient position, or a PNP applying for a pediatric position, or a PMHNP in psych, or a WHNP in OB/Gyn, etc.