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BSN rant/inquire

ADN/BSN   (5,845 Views 33 Comments)
by mw1179 mw1179 (New) New

751 Profile Views; 8 Posts

Are there BSN programs out there that don't require you to take two history and two government classes!? I think my jaw dropped when I saw a BSN course requirement list for a particular school. I was disgusted actually. Why on earth would you need to take multiple history and government classes for a BSN. What a way for them to just make more money!!!! It's ridiculous. *off my soapbox*

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861 Posts; 14,808 Profile Views

Yes, there are BSN programs that do not require those classes. But regardless of the school, you will have to complete their general ed requirements to earn that BSN.

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MrChicagoRN has 30 years experience as a RN and specializes in Leadership, Psych, HomeCare, Amb. Care.

2,589 Posts; 28,518 Profile Views

Maybe because the institution believes that a person who earns a baccalaureate degree should be an educated and well rounded individual?

When I completed by BSN, I had to take a religion course, fine arts and literature, psychology.

Look at different schools, but you may find that you actually enjoy learning something outside your comfort zone.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

3 Followers; 13,342 Posts; 115,598 Profile Views

I know that in certain states, government classes are required for all baccalaureate programs.

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 317,947 Profile Views

A college-educated citizen has a wide repertoire of knowledge in many different topics, not just whatever their major or degree concentration covered. In essence, the extra knowledge widens a person's worldview.

American history came in handy whenever I'd receive a patient who was a veteran or came of age in a different generation. Sociology is useful when interacting with disadvantaged patients as well as their upper crust counterparts. Psychology has utility because we manage an array of human behaviors on a daily basis.

If you do not like the idea of taking coursework that seems unrelated to your major or concentration, there are trade schools that cater to this narrow mindset.

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JustBeachyNurse has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics.

1 Follower; 1 Article; 13,944 Posts; 99,985 Profile Views

I know TX mandates each student take a TX history/government course (even if taking the class online or distance) in order to graduate regardless of major

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WookieeRN is a BSN, RN and specializes in PACU.

1,036 Posts; 19,617 Profile Views

I don't really understand what is so disgusting about a well-rounded education.

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8 Posts; 751 Profile Views

I have taken sociology and psychology and I agree those are important to take because they both

have to do with the mind and the body. I just didn't see why government and history classes

were needed. Because I don't agree with it, doesn't make me narrow minded. Everyone is entitled

to their opinion.

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4 Followers; 11,299 Posts; 76,694 Profile Views

General Education requirements are pretty standard, aren't they?

When I decided to go back to college in my late 30's to get my ADN, I had to take a few classes that I hadn't taken with the General Education part way back at age 18-19 but they were related to nursing (micro, physio, anatomy). My prior major was Social Work so I had a lot of psych/soc classes already. (I didn't have to take chemistry though - I took it in high school and they gave me credit for it!).

I did a RN to BSN program 4 years ago (had to take statistics class first) and all the classes were nursing (except 2 religion classes since it was a religious institution), since I already had a General Education background and university classes as well.

I think it is just normal for college to include a well-rounded education. Plus, some recent stats I read say that the two years of community college classes are more like high school now because we are not doing a good job in high schools teaching kids fundamentals. Like reading and math for instance. :sarcastic: But that's another subject.

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3 Articles; 10,428 Posts; 89,385 Profile Views

Much will depend on the school's individual requirements for BSN: there are wide variances among them, so YES you can find schools with more and less requriements than others. Some may require a government course (State mandated), some may require a spirituality course (school mandated), among other things.

If you have an Associates now, you may or may not have already completed some of the requirements you are seeing for the BSN program. Some credits transfer, some don't....some schools will approve as transfers only those with a grade of B or above. Up to the school.

In my search for a BSN program that best matched my needs, I found that courses taken for prior degrees completed most of those GE requirements, but I'd still need the school-specific ones. I just looked for the school(s) that I felt were the best match/value, etc.

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86 Posts; 2,152 Profile Views

I always find humanities and social science classes much easier than actual science classes, so I don't really understand why you are so bothered by them. They should be the classes that could be used to boost your cumulative GPA.

BSN is a full undergraduate degree that requires four years of college education however you think. People who go to ABSN schools already had BS/BA in non-nursing fields. People with ADN/ASN who apply to BSN schools are required to complete certain credit numbers of or a number of specific general education courses before they can start BSN schools.

Humanities courses are required to be taken for almost everybody if he/she wants to obtain a bachelor's degree in any field.

Edited by Ndoht
insert space b/t paragraphs

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Pink Magnolia is a BSN, RN and specializes in LAD.

314 Posts; 9,339 Profile Views

That's the type of education expected of a bachelor's degree graduate...well-rounded. Use it as a learning opportunity.

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