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Brain sheet for ED?

Emergency   (693 Views 9 Comments)
by SR8811 SR8811 (New Member) New Member

325 Profile Views; 7 Posts

Hey friends,

I am in an LPN2RN program and my preceptorship is in an ED, and I was hoping to get a few of your "brain sheets" to either use or create my own based on them. By brain sheets I mean the sheets you basically write the patients info out on during report and and notes throughout the shift.

Also, open for any tips and advice!

The ED is what I am most interested in department wise so I am hoping having the ED down as my preceptorship experience will help when it comes to applying for ED jobs. Unfortunately my preceptorship experience is 1.5 hours away from home so no chance of working there.

Thanks!

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HarleyGrandma has 2 years experience as a ADN, RN, EMT-B and specializes in Emergency.

146 Posts; 4,578 Profile Views

I don't use a brain sheet, things move too fast. I document in real time (or within minutes) because traumas come in and staff gets shifted around. Multiple departments are involved in care at the same time and need information from each other. At shift change we do a brief verbal bedside report. So much of the ED is gathering information while performing tasks (hooking to the monitor, starting IV) and then quickly typing it all into the computer from memory.

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5 Followers; 2,968 Posts; 19,087 Profile Views

Yeah, I never used a brain sheet in the ED unless you count a strip of 2" tape on my leg with things written on it a brain sheet.

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Agreeing with those above; "brain sheets" aren't very common at all in the ED. Generally speaking the pace is too fast for them to be of much benefit.

The report you receive is going to be very concise.

You will frequently reference your ED assignment (e.g. your individual patients' charts) in the EMR in order to keep your workflow going.

Maybe we can help more if you describe specifically what you envision you would put on a brain sheet. Remember though, there's very little of "X is due at 2100" where having a brain sheet for what you do at hourly times could help you. All ED orders are STAT, they are generally to be completed ASAP in conjunction with following related policies.

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CTFD_RN has 2 years experience as a BSN and specializes in ER.

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Ditto to all of the above. The only time I use paper is either for an SBAR printed on my admitted pts that I use to stay organized on admitting orders or the paper towel I write VS on in my pts room so I don't have to log on to the computer. 

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Beware the paper towel. I can’t tell you how many times a well-meaning co-worker “helped” me by cleaning up and throwing away all of my documentation. I learned the tape trick during my first round of flight nursing and found it works just as well in the ED

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Pixie.RN has 18 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

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Yep, tape! Don't write on a glove, lol. I had a bad habit of writing on my arm. But charting in real time is essential! We also used SBAR for hands-off, it's a good format. 

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amyjm333 is a RN and specializes in Emergency/Trauma Nurse.

39 Posts; 1,582 Profile Views

As a new RN in the ED I made my own “cheat sheet” - it included all the things I needed to know in order to enter the info into my triage, without getting any “hard stops” or things we MUST know to complete the triage screens in our EMR (firstnet). I would then document on the back of the sheet any meds or whatever else I needed to remember to chart. This is basically what I used.  I am now able to just recall all of the triage info and just write down VS & any verbal orders the MD gives me when we are both at bedside. Or I chart at bedside in real time. It gets easier with experience, but my cheat sheet helped when I was a brand new RN in the ED :) 

 

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