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amyjm333

amyjm333 RN

Emergency/Trauma Nurse

ACLS, TNCC, NIHSS, PALS

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amyjm333 is a RN and specializes in Emergency/Trauma Nurse.

amyjm333's Latest Activity

  1. amyjm333

    Basic Seizure Care

    In the ED our standard is to initiate Seizure Precautions (bed rails up and pads placed), blood glucose taken, seizure time and length recorded, VS, verify suction is available, MD notification with med orders if applicable.
  2. amyjm333

    Tele nurse wanting to transition to ED; advice?

    I would take the above advice and talk to the director in your current hospital’s ED. They are often happy to hire nurses with experience- even if it is not in the ED. At least that’s how it is in my state. We hire even new grads, so a nurse with a year or two of tele is valued! There will be a mindset change necessary to transition to the ED from floor nursing, though. When our patients walk in, we are starting from scratch. We don’t have diagnoses and all testing is yet to be done. I have not done any floor nursing so I don’t know how long that mental switch actually takes, but several of my most beloved coworkers came down to the ED from the floor and they’ve all expressed that “it’s very very different” and that they had to change the way they thought and how they prioritized patient care. Good of luck in your transition! Being an ED nurse rocks!!
  3. amyjm333

    New ER Nurse , Feel SO stupid

    My other small piece of advice is to focus on the truly emergent patients. Most people in an ED on an average day are not at risk of dying, but some are- focus on those. Good luck to you!
  4. amyjm333

    New ER Nurse , Feel SO stupid

    Ten patients is too many! I’ve got a few years experience as an ED nurse and we get 3 patients. There are times it’s so busy I feel rushed and time crunched. I’m pretty sure if we had ten patients each and every nurse in my department would quit. (Not saying you should do that). My only suggestion is to MAKE TIME to go over those results. Also, get yourself some form of standard organization going on. All patients may end up waiting longer but I have a feeling your dept isn’t going to notice. With ten patients, no one has the time to criticize you!
  5. amyjm333

    How does your ER handle level 3 ESI pts?

    Our ESI 3s generally get labs (according to complaint), rad studies (again, according to complaint), a bag of fluids and appropriate meds to control symptoms. Once tests are resulted we either dc them w/ referral to specialist, or work on admitting them. I can’t say I feel they clog up the department, as many end up having legitimate complaints confirmed by labs and/or X-RAY/CT. I feel that the level 4&5s are the ones that should visit one of the local urgent care clinics, and could use a bit of drain-o.
  6. amyjm333

    Valuable life lessons from an ER nurse....

    Your kids are your responsibility.
  7. amyjm333

    Valuable life lessons from an ER nurse....

    Get yourself a PCP.
  8. amyjm333

    Brain sheet for ED?

    As a new RN in the ED I made my own “cheat sheet” - it included all the things I needed to know in order to enter the info into my triage, without getting any “hard stops” or things we MUST know to complete the triage screens in our EMR (firstnet). I would then document on the back of the sheet any meds or whatever else I needed to remember to chart. This is basically what I used. I am now able to just recall all of the triage info and just write down VS & any verbal orders the MD gives me when we are both at bedside. Or I chart at bedside in real time. It gets easier with experience, but my cheat sheet helped when I was a brand new RN in the ED :)
  9. amyjm333

    ED staffing ratios

    We staff 1:3. But when we get a truly emergent patient our zonemotes absorb our other two patients while we are 1:1. Charge also helps out wherever anyone needs it. And we usually have a throughput RN as well who helps by discharging patients, catching nurses up when needed, cleaning rooms, etc. We have amazing teamwork in our ED.
  10. Heya Frank! How abouts you jump in and we get outta here?!
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