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Artificial Nails Anyone

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hGooding hGooding (New) New

I was wondering your views on artificial nails in the critical care workplace. Should or should they not be allowed in the hospital setting? If so why and if not why?

Thank You for your input!

I myself wore artificial nails for a long time in ICU then a new infection control policy came out and artificial nails were then banned.

The rational there was the high risk of cross infection!

Actually tried to contest it as the blue light test showed artificial and real nails were the same risk and the infection control risk was as always dependent on the individuals hand hygiene, but the hospital did not see it as such so I was forced to remove my nails. Now have long natural nails and there is a debate going on now whether to make nurses cut there nails right back:stone some you just carnt win.

gale

I have been wearing fake nails for about 2 years now and was just recently told that i had to remove them, keeping in mind that i was working in a military hospital, i did not know that other places were doing the same thing, however i do believe that fakes carry more microrganisms however if you are wearing gloves and doing what your supposed to that should not be an issue, but people never do what they know they should

Studies offer mounting evidence that long nails or those that are bonded with cosmetic acrylic or plastic material can shelter bacteria, viruses or fungi such as yeast and pose a special danger to those with weakened immune systems.

According to a growing number of studies, nails longer than a quarter of an inch offer a good environment for infections to grow. Newborns, patients with cancer and other diseases, and those in high-risk settings such as intensive-care units or operating rooms are especially vulnerable.

Chipped nail polish and artificial nails also can support the growth of organisms such as yeast that resist a good hand washing, according to an October 2002 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report also contained guidelines on hygiene for artificial and natural nails.

Lorie P.

Specializes in Med/Surge, Private Duty Peds.

no long real or artificial nails at my work........both tend to harbor cooties and if you are caught. 1 warning. 2 write up and 3 suspension

besides i found that long nails either way tend to get in the way and with very elderly pts with fragial skin and easy way to give them a skintear that leads to a whole heap of more problems for both the pt/staff to deal with

besides it is much easy to clean short nails and keep them that way.

No artificial, long, or painted nails allowed here. I'm used to having long nails, so it's sort of an adjustment for me, but I agree with the policy.

Short, bare, clean nails.

I can't imagine trying to keep polish and acrylics on hands getting scrubbed 22 times a day. And the acrylics can foster fungi underneath - I've gotten it in the past - and a chip in polish can harbor microrganisms, not to mention shelter a piece of pooh.

Besides, imagine poking a hole through gloves. Bye bye, protection!

live4today, RN

Specializes in Community Health Nurse.

I was wondering your views on artificial nails in the critical care workplace. Should or should they not be allowed in the hospital setting? If so why and if not why?

Thank You for your input!

I'm all for banning artificial nails from clinical workplace areas because they carry a lot of bacteria that the patients do not need to be exposed to. There's more than enough germs in the hospitals as it is without staff adding to them. :rolleyes:

And for those nurses (like myself) who don't wear artificial nails, we should keep our real nails short and clean at all times. I did this before becoming a nurse because I didn't want to scratch any of my children, or anyone's child for that matter. Common sense is really not all that bad to listen to. :)

Firstly, is this a homework question? It just is posed like an assignment might be. As a traveler, I have worked at many hospitals. None allow fake nails anymore.

I'm particularly fond of polish in a neutral clear type color, but have been thinking of the crud that gets stuck if the polish chips and pretty much decided to avoid the polish as well.

tntrn, ASN, RN

Specializes in L & D; Postpartum. Has 34 years experience.

I'm an unhappy former acrylic nail wearer. I went to acrylics because my own nails are weak, thin, crack and peel, sometimes to the point of bleeding. Keeping polish on acrylics is far easier than on natural nails because the oils in your natural nails are a detriment to good adherence. I have always worn my nails, (acrylic or natural) short because I sew, and play musical instruments that require it. I DO NOT in any way think my nails and hands are any healthier now than when I wore acrylics, and I don't really care what the studies say. It's very hard for me to believe that when my nails and cuticles are cracked and even bleeding they are less of a health threat than when I had short, perfectly manicured, no broken skin acrylic nails.

Still, I took them off. I know nurses who are now putting them back on, for much the same reason I cite above---their natural nails are a health problem. Perhaps every time we have a bleeding nail, torn by merely bumping into a piece of equipment, we should run to the ER or Employee health.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 14 years experience.

I was wondering your views on artificial nails in the critical care workplace. Should or should they not be allowed in the hospital setting? If so why and if not why?

Thank You for your input!

The last time I wore acrylic nails was 2 years ago, and I was not in the nursing field at that time. They harbor bacteria; therefore, they cannot be healthy for those who are constantly exposed to germs.

Artificial nails should absolutely NOT be allowed for nurses.

Here's why:

http://www.physweekly.com/archive/00/04_24_00/itn2.html

This is a documented case - one can only imagine how many undiscovered instances of this sort of thing there are.

Edited to add: longer nails - whether artificial or real - can also cause microtears in gloves exposing patients to your germs, and you to theirs. I personally think long nails are pretty, but I knew when I signed on for the job that I'd be relegated to ugly hands.

Amanda

we as nurses don't wear caps any more d/t them getting caught in lines, etc; with the artificial nails, i am also afraid of injuring patients. i had short artificial nails at one time, but have one or two co-workers with the reaaaly long nails. i just can't see how i would be able to do anything that way. more chance of popping nails, injuring self, others, and leaving myself open to whatever is out there.

It is actually a JCAHO requirement, not one started by your facility. In order to conply with their rulings, anyone involved in direct patient care should not have artificial nails or even there own nails longer than 1/4".

And I will go as far to say that if I was ever a patient in a hospital, and my nurse came in with artificial nails, it would be reported to administration immediately. And not just the manager on the floor.

That ruling is there for a reason.

luvmy2angels

Specializes in Geriatrics. Has 22 years experience.

No artificial nails or long nails, or nail polish in our area hospitals. There was an incedent a few years back where a nurse in the NICU had artificial nails and a staph infection, ended up giving one of the infants the infection and the baby died. I agree with the policy due to infection control.

CyndieRN2007

Specializes in Occ health, Med/surg, ER.

In the IV theory book used my the school I'm attending, it states that 12 neonatal deaths were traced back to 2 nurses, one with artifical nails and the other with long natural nails, both colonized with staph. It also states that a culture of the artificial nails after a 5 minute surgical scrub did not reduce the colonized bacteria count taken before the scrub. Additionally, it said that nails are considered too long if nail length exceeds the finger length.

Indy, LPN, LVN

Specializes in ICU, telemetry, LTAC. Has 5 years experience.

I myself wore artificial nails for a long time in ICU then a new infection control policy came out and artificial nails were then banned.

The rational there was the high risk of cross infection!

Actually tried to contest it as the blue light test showed artificial and real nails were the same risk and the infection control risk was as always dependent on the individuals hand hygiene, but the hospital did not see it as such so I was forced to remove my nails. Now have long natural nails and there is a debate going on now whether to make nurses cut there nails right back:stone some you just carnt win.

gale

What is this blue light test?

I have to admit I myself agree to this policy as well (no long or acrylic nails)....but then again I'm just a nursing student.....that's also our schools policy.

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