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tntrn

tntrn

RN
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  1. tntrn

    Concealed Carry for Caregivers

    Not that we would ever move back to CA, but IF we were considering it, that would take care of that.
  2. tntrn

    Concealed Carry for Caregivers

    Quail yes; deer, not. Many hunting experts say that the .223 ammo used in an AR-15 doesn't have the power to kill a large animal on contact. so they are not recommended for hunting.
  3. tntrn

    Concealed Carry for Caregivers

    head shot.
  4. tntrn

    Off duty RN scope of practice on an airplane.

    When he first started describing it to me, I said, "let me guess...it was like the keystone cops." I am sure we've all seen it. I should add that this was pre-911 and now the pilots do not leave the cockpit except to use the loo. Another pilot deadheading might do that now. But the cabin crew relays information to the Captain and he/she contacts Med-Link for the serious cases.
  5. tntrn

    Off duty RN scope of practice on an airplane.

    I worked 35 years in Labor and Delivery and the only chest compressions I ever did was on an infant. In all those years of nursing, there was never once a code called on an adult in my department. So even though I took ACLS, (talk about a fish out of water....the acronyms alone were a mystery the first time) I would hardly consider myself qualified to run a code.....or give the meds....maybe act as scribe, but nothing more.
  6. tntrn

    Off duty RN scope of practice on an airplane.

    Interesting thread: My husband is a retired airline captain with 38 years experience and has related many post-trip medical emergency stories to me. First of all,the crew doesn't make medical decisions unless they are very simple problems, such as a passenger who is hyperventilating. The cockpit crew is immediately notified of any serious problem and the cabin crew makes an announcement for any medical personnel to ring their call light. I have done this many times, had a FA quietly come to my seat, I tell them my credentials and experience (for me: RN: Labor and Delivery, OB, peds) and they decide later if I am needed or not. For serious problems, the flight crew contacts their medical advise folks, Docs at Med-Link I think it is. Those docs will give orders depending on what information is fed to them from those in the back. The captain is called the Pilot in Command for a reason and he or she will make a decision to request a diversion or to press on, with all the information being taken into account. One on occasion, my husband was mid-Pacific,half-way between the West Coast and Hawaii, when an old man coded. Not knowing at the time that he was DNR and going home to die, the crew started CPR and my husband contacted Med-link. Mind you, this guy was gone and there was 3 hours left in the flight regardless of pressing on or turning back. After talking to his wife, finding out he was DNR. my husband told the crew to dc CPR and do what they could to cover him reseated next to his wife. The wife sat with him holding his hand for the remainder of the flight. Med-link wanted them to continue CPR for the remainder of the flight. The PIC said "that's not happening." Med Link then said to restart CPR on approach (I guess to make a show of having done it according to the book) and again the PIC said, "and that's not going to happen either." Med-link will be notified for all serious medical problems. Years ago, before the Med-Link thing, he told me of a situation where 5 docs of different persuasions responded and my husband did a quick interview and he decided which one of them would be in charge. I told my husband that if I were ever on one of his flights and someone went into labor, I, the experienced L and D nurse, would be in charge. He knew I was serious. I am only about 1/4 joking about that, because unless there's a veterinarian, or an actual midwife or OB also on board, I can guarantee I would have had more recent experience and would have "caught"more babies than anybody else who might show..... I have made my presence known several times in flight...I have never actually had to help. But I would. Personally, going through an entire ACLS procedure mid-flight anywhere, without having any kind of facility for transport within 15-30 minutes from door to door seems like overreach to me.
  7. tntrn

    Ebola in Texas

    I received my Nurse.com magazine in the mail today. Of note is an article about a nurse who found that putting on and taking off all that protective gear isn't that easy "in an intensive 10 day class" she took. Ten days! Can you imagine intensive 10 day classes for all nurses (and other health care workers)?
  8. tntrn

    Ebola in Texas

    Um-hm..street lights, bike paths......voter registration....
  9. tntrn

    Ebola in Texas

    Wish I knew the source, or could remember it, but the Republicans actually voted to give Obama more than he requested for the CDC. And of course, over 90% of their budget goes for stuff that has nothing to do with pandemic prevention anyway. It's been diverted to community type stuff. And we are going to pay the price for that.
  10. tntrn

    Ebola in Texas

    And that is a great question. Our yearly "competencies" were computer based things with a 30-45 minute presentation to watch and then the test. The challenge was to take the test without ever watching the presentation......which saved lots of time if you could do it and since we had to do it while at work (not given extra time for it) it was fine with most of us. And since there was no penalty for taking the test until you passed it, that is what most of us did. Now factor into that the insane idea that we became "competent" on some things some of us, as OB nurses only, had NEVER EVER seen, let alone done and it's easy to see that our competency in some areas was non-existent, except on the record. I have to wonder what happens with the protective clothing once it is removed by the health care worker. Is it incinerated or otherwise disposed of, is it sanitized in some way, or do they think it can be reused? Clearly, if the virus can live on surfaces for a number of hours, the protective clothing itself becomes a source of potential contamination. I also don't believe, for a micro-second, that we are being told the truth about much of this.
  11. tntrn

    Ebola in Texas

    Right, but if someone is living there, perhaps they would be in situations in their life outside work where they might be esposed. After I posted that, I saw where they say he might have been exposed while cleaned a van where a patient had died. And that begs another question: The cameramen clean vans that transport patients?
  12. tntrn

    Ebola in Texas

    I think the cameraman has lived there for 3 years, so it is possible he was exposed in some way other than his work.
  13. tntrn

    Ebola in Texas

    Thanks for that information. With that, it begs the question, for me, as to why Dr. Nancy Snyderman and her crew will be going into isolation for 21 days. Unless they all had broken skin/mucous membrane contact with infected body fluids from someone known to have Ebola.
  14. tntrn

    Ebola in Texas

    I am still unclear about how one gets infected with Ebola....can one get infected from simply being in contact the the bodily fluids of one who is infected? Do the bodily fluids from one infected simply have to touch you, even if there your skin in intact and not mucous membranes?
  15. tntrn

    Ebola in Texas

    The Red Cross is supplying the family with food. They refused to quarantine themselves, as I understand it, and therefore, the legal order for them to stay inside. It may seem harsh, but I feel a necessary precaution.
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