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Are nurses unsupportive spouse magnets??

Nurses   (14,285 Views 83 Comments)
by sticknurse sticknurse (Member) Member

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You are reading page 2 of Are nurses unsupportive spouse magnets??. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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I believe what matters in a family is peace and good relation even if you make more or your DH makes more money.If your DH makes more but there is no peace and good relationship btw you,you can never be happy.

Whichever one you find yourself in,be contempted and do your thing.It's good to be good and it pays to be a good person.

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cmo421 specializes in Trauma ICU,ER,ACLS/BLS instructor.

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Ok I am guilty as charged. I married someone who had major issues. But I divorced him too!! Many people become nurses because they need to be needed, are controlling, have had a difficult childhood,or maybe a bad experience. Some just go into it to meet a mate. Whatever.

As far as "many are married to policeman and fireman", that is a whole different topic! Kidding. Nurses along with fireman and police are service driven.We start out because we love to take care,heal,advocate and are hands on. Is it any wonder why many end up with each other. Who else could tolerate us? And as far as some "marrying up", I did not think that anyone was better then a Nurse!!!

I now have a very supportive partner. Neither a fireman,or policeman. Sometimes it takes awhile to find that special person.

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I have to admit that "I love to be needed", which is probably a large reason why I went into nursing. I'm fairly young (just turned 26) and not married --single, no boyfriend --and I have found that men who seem to be attracted to me are often the needy, emotional, help-me-fix-my-life types. Luckily I never ended up marrying any of them.

I have since decided that if I am ever to be in another relationship, there are some basic standards that the guy must meet. Not superficial ones, but things like having some kind of ambition in life, supportive, confident, and not always complaining. Also, must have a job, or be on the way to getting a job at some point. (In the past, my only 2 long-term relationships were with guys that were unemployed indefinitely.)

I think I've learned that a lot of the time in life, we get what we ask for. If I make it a point to have someone who is supportive and capable, versus whiny and lazy, then there is higher chance of me finding someone like that.

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sharona97 is a BSN, RN and specializes in IM/Critical Care/Cardiology.

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I'm guilty as charged too. Did everything for everybody but myself, and had to learn the hard way to take care of me. Now I have a supportive, very loving husband and we laugh at ourselves if we start being stupid!!!!:uhoh3:

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2,999 Posts; 14,928 Profile Views

really, commuter?

really, emmanuel?

hmmm.

haven't seen either.

i know plenty of nurses who are married to firefighters and policemen.

hmmmm, again.

leslie

Yeah, really.

How many nurses are perfectionists? How many beat themselves up over the most insignificant of mistakes? How many get angry when their patients choose their own way, rather than what the nurse wishes them to do? Or become frustrated and disillusioned when they just can't "reach" a patient? I can't tell you the number of times I've heard "Well, if he isn't going to follow the recommended treatment, why doesn't he just go home?" How many nurses feel guilty for not working extra shifts when asked? Or work off the clock at the end of their shift 'to finish up'? Or feel they have to complete each and every task before handing their patient load over to the next shift? How many feel personally responsible for their patients' outcomes? And so on...

Many of the attributes of an excellent nurse can become pathologic if you don't take time out to care for yourself. And for those who don't set those boundaries, they often are magnets for needy people. (perhaps it's a mutual attraction)

That's all I'm saying...

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classicdame is a MSN, EdD and specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

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I once worked on a unit where everyone on my shift was married to a man who could not or would not work. So depends on what you mean by "supportive".

I believe most nurses are enablers. We try to fix everything and everybody to our own detriment.

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2,999 Posts; 14,928 Profile Views

I once worked on a unit where everyone on my shift was married to a man who could not or would not work. So depends on what you mean by "supportive".

I believe most nurses are enablers. We try to fix everything and everybody to our own detriment.

I have seen this far too many times to believe otherwise. Sure, not all nurses marry dependents, or care for everyone but themselves; but enough to make me wary.

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GadgetRN71 has 10 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Operating Room.

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I had read an article that talked about a study of children of alcoholics. They found that many of these adult children were in careers such as nursing because they were used to being in crisis mode, some of the doc/nurse dynamic can be seen as codependent, and nurses often put others needs before their own. Are all nurses in codependent relationships? No, not all. But I believe the numbers are up there.

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sharona97 is a BSN, RN and specializes in IM/Critical Care/Cardiology.

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I should have gone into it further with the supportive thing, becauseI hear what you're saying and agree with you. Was once in a bad situation, got out of it, brushed myself off and now have a husband who is supportive in communication and listens well. I'm sure I'm not alone on this one!

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4 Followers; 11,299 Posts; 76,637 Profile Views

"Marry up"? :rolleyes:

My husband has been very supportive. He encouraged me through nursing school when I felt like quitting. We are equal partners.

Not that he doesn't piss me off sometimes or vice versa. No one is perfect.

But controlling? No way.

steph

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11,191 Posts; 53,823 Profile Views

Yeah, really.

How many nurses are perfectionists? How many beat themselves up over the most insignificant of mistakes? How many get angry when their patients choose their own way, rather than what the nurse wishes them to do? Or become frustrated and disillusioned when they just can't "reach" a patient? I can't tell you the number of times I've heard "Well, if he isn't going to follow the recommended treatment, why doesn't he just go home?" How many nurses feel guilty for not working extra shifts when asked? Or work off the clock at the end of their shift 'to finish up'? Or feel they have to complete each and every task before handing their patient load over to the next shift? How many feel personally responsible for their patients' outcomes? And so on...

i work with a feisty crew.

and i need to get out more. :)

leslie

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4 Followers; 11,299 Posts; 76,637 Profile Views

i work with a feisty crew.

and i need to get out more. :)

leslie

Me too . . . .

;)

steph

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