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Annoying Employee

I have a situation at work that I'm having a bit of issue with, and am asking for opinions. I'm a supervisor at work. Recently, we've hired a nurse that has an unbearable personality. So unbearable, I'm finding it hard to even be tolerant. Last week, I went over orientation paperwork with her, and she had to excuse herself to go cry. Twice. Mind you, the paperwork was not overwhelming, a simple checklist. I tried being empathetic, in which she responded her AC at home was broke. She hadn't slept well. I figure ok, some people are just overly sensitive. However, I was told she went to others making it seem as if I myself had made her cry, and perhaps even intentional. I will admit, I have chronic RBF syndrome (no need to deny it lol) but I at no point was mean to her (I would admit this). No BS straight to the point attitude, sure, but not mean. (Mind you, I'm in my last quarter of RN school, kinda dry of a sense of humor right now). At this point, I really want no interaction unless she has a question/concern about our residents or her job duties and responsibilities.

I'm just wondering, especially as a supervisor, how others would approach this issue?? How does one really deal with an employee that you have a personality clash with?

Being told by "others" isn't a reliable source. Go straight to the source. A simple "Hey, lets talk about what happened last week and clear away any concerns or misconceptions" may be all that you need to do. Its very possible she was just having a bad day and she isn't normally emotional over small things. Or maybe she is and she may not work out but you won't find out from second hand sources. Also, take note to how your coming off to others. We all have stressful times, I just graduated last April and I get it, but you are still going to have professionally deal with workers you may not personally like. Being a supervisor of anyone is a dreadful job, one I would never want in most settings, so I do sympathize with your frustration. Tell her that you should both put that incident behind yourselves and start fresh. Then find out from there what kind of worker she may be. GL!

You're a supervisor of nurses and you're not a nurse yet? What kind of facility is this?

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

I would throw her a life line and point out some positive things about her work. Is she a new graduate? If you're a supervisor, you probably should be willing to bend a little bit. You'll be making your own life harder if you decide that it's something you're not willing to do.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

You're a supervisor of nurses and you're not a nurse yet? What kind of facility is this?

I wondered this too, but she refers to residents, so I'm guessing this is a LTC setting. She specifically mentioned being in an RN program. Perhaps she is an LPN supervising other LPNs?

I apologize for the lack of clarity. Yes it is LTC.

NightNerd, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-surg/tele, palliative, psych. Has 6 years experience.

I dunno about others, but when I start a new job I am a very different person than usual - more cautious and more sensitive. Since she is a recent hire, she could just be extremely reactive right now to things that normally wouldn't provoke that response. I agree with others who recommended extending the olive branch and asking, "Hey, what happened the other day? Are we cool?" I always respect a supervisor who is in tune enough to sense when something is going on with staff and addresses it straight on.

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 25 years experience.

Lower the temperature of the building; she is a special snowflake and must not be allowed to melt...

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

" I'm in my last quarter of RN school".

What supervisory position do you hold?

smartnurse1982

Has 7 years experience.

You're a supervisor of nurses and you're not a nurse yet? What kind of facility is this?

Anything is possible in Florida!

brownbook

Has 35 years experience.

I can leave this page and Google it.......but I'll just stay here. What in the heck is RBF syndrome? Please don't use acronyms or abbreviations unless they are common ones.

I'm not at all creative, can't even guess what it might be?

I'm either sorry about your condition, or don't get the joke?

Otherwise I think your post is interesting, you sound like a great LVN supervisor on your way to being a great nurse. As long as your RBF doesn't derail your career?

Elektra6, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Home Health, LTC, subacute. Has 15 years experience.

RBF. Resting ***** face lol. I suffer from this affliction as well

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

I can leave this page and Google it.......but I'll just stay here. What in the heck is RBF syndrome? Please don't use acronyms or abbreviations unless they are common ones.

I'm not at all creative, can't even guess what it might be?

I'm either sorry about your condition, or don't get the joke?

Otherwise I think your post is interesting, you sound like a great LVN supervisor on your way to being a great nurse. As long as your RBF doesn't derail your career?

Resting female dog face.

cardiacfreak, ADN

Specializes in Hospice.

What is it about her personality that is unbearable? I was in management for 6 years, and managed staff that I didn't like personally, but still treated them with respect and had to interact with them.

You sound a lot like me, RBF, straight to the point, no sugar coating etc... I have realized over the years that my personality is intimidating to others. I am very conscientious about how I come off to others, sometimes they are the ones with the problem and sometimes it is how I come across to them.

I agree with a PP, going to the employee and talking with her is your best move. You may learn something about how to interact with her in the future and avoid any further misconceptions.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

What exactly is an "unbearable" personality? Sounds like you've already made up your mind about this gal. I agree with the folks suggesting you seek her out, draw her out and try to overcome your initial impression. We don't have to like everyone we work with, but we have to pretend to -- especially those of us in supervisory positions.

CoffeeRTC, BSN, RN

Has 25 years experience.

LPNs can be supervisors, staff development coordinators MDS nurses and the list goes on in LTC. Since you wil be a supervisor, I would go up to her and ask her about last week.

Sounds like it will be interesting. LTC is not for the faint of heart.

Ruas61, BSN, RN

Specializes in MDS/ UR. Has 38 years experience.

In MN an LPN can 'supervise' an RN in a clerical manner but not clinical.

There was some great advice here. Unfortunately, she has since turned in her notice. She had a fall and admission in one night, decided that was too much for her, returned the next night and gave a notice that she would not be returning.

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 25 years experience.

In MN an LPN can 'supervise' an RN in a clerical manner but not clinical.

Same in WI, though I know from personal experience there are ways around that. A former DON promoted an LPN into the unit manager role awhile back and just changed the job title to something that didn't include the word manager. She was the unit coordinator. Same job, different title.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 14 years experience.

The OP did not specify that crier was an RN. I'm guessing she was an LPN, and the OP (also an LPN, about to complete her RN) supervises her. Or DID supervise her, as the case appears to be.

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