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Am I fired? CNA Checking Blood Sugar

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Specializes in CNA. Has 12 years experience.

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Well something unfortunate happened...I am both an LVN and CNA at different jobs. I was at my CNA job when an RN asked me to check a B/S, I did it without even thinking twice (because I do it all the time at my other job) Someone saw and reported it. Am I fired ? What are your thoughts? Thanks 

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

Just now, oldie said:

Well something unfortunate happened........I am both an LVN and CNA at different jobs. I was at my CNA job when an RN asked me to check a B/S, I did it without even thinking twice (because I do it all the time at my other job) Someone saw and reported it. Am I fired ? What are your thoughts? Thanks 

I know nothing about your workplace policies, or even what state you're in. When I worked in Texas, CNAs did all of the accuchecks.

oldie, CNA, LVN

Specializes in CNA. Has 12 years experience.

Just now, Sour Lemon said:

I know nothing about your workplace policies, or even what state you're in. When I worked in Texas, CNAs did all of the accuchecks.

Sorry about that im in CA and CNAS are not allowed to do that here

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

Just now, oldie said:

Sorry about that im in CA and CNAS are not allowed to do that here

In that case, it will come down to your employer's policies and how punitive-minded they are ...and that's if any rule was broken.

It sounds like an extremely minor thing, to me. I'm not the boss, though.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

An RN directed you to check a blood sugar. You followed direction. You are covered.

The concern is.. who saw and reported it. 

Discuss this with the nurse that asked you to perform the task. 

SilverBells, BSN

Specializes in Rehab/Nurse Manager. Has 6 years experience.

If you have an active LVN license, then you should be covered as obtaining blood sugars should be within your scope of practice.  Make sure your supervisors at your CNA job are aware of this.  Perhaps the person reporting you was not aware that you are also an LVN.  I would think, though, that they would have better things to do than to fire someone who is acting within their scope of practice.  It's possible they would engage in minor disciplinary action/write up if it is truly against workplace policies and they do not wish for you to complete this task despite your LVN status, but I am hopeful they would have more important issues to worry about.  

I hope it would be handled with a simple review of expectations and would not become a big issue.

That said,

37 minutes ago, SilverBells said:

Perhaps the person reporting you was not aware that you are also an LVN.  I would think, though, that they would have better things to do than to fire someone who is acting within their scope of practice. 

There are two separate issues, one being the scope of practice associated with the LVN license and the other being whether or not the employer has vetted the employee to work in a certain capacity.

OP I do hope you will not be harshly disciplined for this! It is certainly easy to understand how/why it happened and is very small potatoes overall. Good luck~

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

Doesn't your glucometer require you to log in with your username/employee badge? If so, how do you have access if you're not allowed to do BG checks? 

oldie, CNA, LVN

Specializes in CNA. Has 12 years experience.

I never even thought about that but your right, basically I was in a covid room and just handed a glucometer. I didn't sign in or anything.

Well I still haven't heard a word from management if I am in trouble how soon do you think I'll hear back? 

speedynurse, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU.

I feel like that is a very minor thing, especially since most techs and CNAs can do blood sugars. And if not....then just say it was a slip of mind because it was. You probably just got in the habit or routine and just did it on auto pilot.

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

Your mistake is rather trivial, oldie, to a nurse who did not get fired for giving a patient SS insulin for having a room number of 312.

The patient's blood sugar was a lot less than their room number!

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

1 hour ago, oldie said:

I never even thought about that but your right, basically I was in a covid room and just handed a glucometer. I didn't sign in or anything.

Well I still haven't heard a word from management if I am in trouble how soon do you think I'll hear back? 

If credentials are required to perform a glucometer check, whoever handed you the glucometer is responsible for the procedure. Let it go. 

Now you need to check with management as to which duties you can perform. I can see where you are confused with LVN vs CNA duties. But you must learn what role you can perform, in which facility.

 

DavidFR, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology, ID, Hepatology, Occy Health. Has 35 years experience.

1 hour ago, klone said:

Doesn't your glucometer require you to log in with your username/employee badge?

I'm not in the US but I have never heard of this. Is this common? Have we really reached this level of mistrust?

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 10 years medical. Has 42 years experience.

6 minutes ago, DavidFR said:

I'm not in the US but I have never heard of this. Is this common? Have we really reached this level of mistrust?

It's not only trust, but lessens mistakes and is cost effective, DavidFR.

In the old days a patient's name band was not scanned so the results could get mixed up. Also, many employees who were diabetics would make free use of the equipment.

DavidFR, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology, ID, Hepatology, Occy Health. Has 35 years experience.

51 minutes ago, Davey Do said:

It's not only trust, but lessens mistakes and is cost effective, DavidFR.

In the old days a patient's name band was not scanned so the results could get mixed up. Also, many employees who were diabetics would make free use of the equipment.

I can see the safety aspect of scanning a patient's name band, and bravo, that's a move forward. We are introducing something similar for chemo and yes, that's good. But for the staff member to have to scan their ID or log in - to a glucometer???? Seems extreme to me. How do students practise?

Many's the time I've let a student take my blood sugar for the practice.  They've taken my vitals and practised ECGs on me.

So if your colleague is feeling faint on duty, you can't even check their blood glucose? Are you allowed to check their blood pressure or do you have to scan into the dynamap?

I know there are nurses who would hide their mistakes, but most of us wouldn't and I just feel we are being more and more infantilised while our professional integrity is more and more undermined.  Will we arrive at taped conversations with patients? CCTV cameras in every room? I'm not going to go on a blood sugar spree for the fun it.

Edited by DavidFR

oldie, CNA, LVN

Specializes in CNA. Has 12 years experience.

On 1/11/2021 at 6:59 PM, DavidFR said:

Will we arrive at taped conversations with patients? CCTV cameras in every room? I'm not going to go on a blood sugar spree for the fun it.

Actually yes every patient room has cameras in it.

DavidFR, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology, ID, Hepatology, Occy Health. Has 35 years experience.

1 hour ago, oldie said:

Actually yes every patient room has cameras in it.

I find that very  sad. Were there lots of cases of abuse?

oldie, CNA, LVN

Specializes in CNA. Has 12 years experience.

1 minute ago, DavidFR said:

I find that very  sad. Were there lots of cases of abuse?

No no! No cases of abuse ever where I work! They say its for patient safety , I do find it creepy though and I wonder if thats a violation of privacy but apparently patients are aware of it.