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Aging Nurses - Where do we go?

Posted

Specializes in Psych, Peds, Geri, Teaching, LTC, QA. Has 20 years experience.

Where should aging nurses go if they can't keep up with young, new grads?

  1. 1. Where should aging nurses go if they can't keep up with young, new grads?

    • Keep trying regular jobs
    • Retire
    • Start your own unique nursing business
    • Be vocal and suggest options
    • Change to a different career

1,753 members have participated

I am an aging nurse (50) who can't really keep up with the young new grads. Why can't there be a nurse company (or hospital or nursing home or staffing agency) that employs such nurses that will work for less money and do less stressful/multi-tasking nursing jobs? I mean we are still valuable. Seems like money and doing things in a rush are what employers want but everywhere is so short staffed. I don't mean to be disrespectful to anyone or anywhere; I just think we are resources that are not being utilized. Thoughts please?

sallyrnrrt, ADN, RN

Specializes in critical care, ER,ICU, CVSURG, CCU.

I hear you, but I will be 67 in March, I have no real desire to retire, I tried that three times, and each time after a few months always came back....I can still hang in critical care ICU/ER....but honestly the 12 hr. Shifts take a toll....

currently I work in a rural physician clinic....awesome hours, and liberal holiday schedule..THE MONEY IS NOT AS GREAT, BUT THE SATISFACTION, AND "physical toll" is far better....I see me doing this as long as endurance and cognition permits....

best wishes

sallyrnrrt, ADN, RN

Specializes in critical care, ER,ICU, CVSURG, CCU.

Home health and Hospice are also great avenues, Weekend sups. in LTC/SNF...also a option

loriangel14, RN

Specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

Oh dear heavens you think 50 is old? Just shoot me now. I work 2 jobs and work out 4-5 times a week. I'm not slowing down yet. I ski. I hike and I travel as well.

Edited by loriangel14

Jensmom7, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice. Has 36 years experience.

I'm on the downside of my career (59) and I've done Hospice for the last 5 years or so. I love it. I spent 26 years doing bedside Nursing in a hospital setting, and left it 10 years ago.

Maybe it's because I'm getting older, but I just got tired of dealing with acute care and all the rules and restrictions they place on patients.

Nothing makes me happier than when I tell one of my patients "Hospice is about choices. Eat dessert before dinner. Hell, eat dessert INSTEAD of dinner" and their eyes light up and they start to understand.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

My friend's mother is 64 years old with severely arthritic knees. Her new niche during the final years of her nursing career is working the night shift at a nursing home. The pace is breathable and she is able to relax while at work.

Ruas61, BSN, RN

Specializes in MDS/ UR. Has 39 years experience.

MDS. telephonic, case management great options.

I'm 50, in home health, none of the younger nurses work more efficiently than me. I'm seeing less fit younger nurses..

I think the learning curve uses up a lot of energy.

TamDar429

Specializes in Psych, Peds, Geri, Teaching, LTC, QA. Has 20 years experience.

Thanks, I've been an MDS in a nursing home twice and it was very stressful, not enough time to get done what needs to be, so end up working 60 hrs / wk. I have friends who are Case Mgrs who cry about the job and say they are the definition of multi-taskers with no end. :(

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Interesting poll, however no responses apply. Work for LESS money?:banghead: We are more valuable than ever,think outside the box a little.

At 50, I was traveling to Hawaii, doing private duty, and agency nursing. At 60, I found my dream job working from home.

Please.. don't sell yourself short.

Home health is great for older nurses. You aren't generally doing much lifting, transfers, or rolling. You also can set your own schedule. The hardest part on your body is that if you are doing wound care you usually have to bend beause even if a patient has a hospital bed they don't raise.

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 19 years experience.

Sorry to say I'm 50 and don't at all consider myself slower or unable to keep up. I work 12 hour shifts and more than keep up. And I'm not what you would even call close to in great shape.

quiltynurse56, LPN, LVN

Specializes in LTC and Pediatrics. Has 3 years experience.

I work part time in a smaller nursing home on the evening shift. It has worked out great for me. I love it.

Jensmom7, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice. Has 36 years experience.

Sorry to say I'm 50 and don't at all consider myself slower or unable to keep up. I work 12 hour shifts and more than keep up. And I'm not what you would even call close to in great shape.

I think it's more of a mental thing for me-I worked my ass off in hospitals doing acute care bedside nursing for 26 years. I finally decided enough was enough.

In Hospice, as long as your patient's symptoms are managed, and they have everything in place that they need, there are no emergencies.

For the most part, families are appreciative and actually like us (except for the members who live 1500 miles away, swoop in for one visit, tell the family who has been dealing with everything how terrible they are for "giving up on a miracle" and then swoop out again, leaving us to pick up the pieces, but that's another conversation).

TamDar429

Specializes in Psych, Peds, Geri, Teaching, LTC, QA. Has 20 years experience.

Thanks. When the patient is actually passing, don't you have to go to the home no matter what time it is?

Farawyn

Has 25 years experience.

What about p4p, the Over 40 Edition?

I work 2 jobs, but they are considered "softer jobs" SN and HH. I'm not 50 yet, in my 40s.

I work 6 days a week. I think it would easier for me to go back to the clinic or the floors some days. At least when I left work, I left it there.

Totally agree with BTDT on the $$$ thing.

Edited by Farawyn

Jensmom7, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice. Has 36 years experience.

Thanks. When the patient is actually passing, don't you have to go to the home no matter what time it is?

If you're on call, yes. We have dedicated after hours and weekend staff, and we do 3-4 backup on call shifts/month, so it's rarely an issue.

My patients are all in one facility, so unless the family requests Hospice support we don't have to go.

CathRN

Specializes in everywhere. Has 15 years experience.

Try State Surveyor jobs, lots of travel, but easier on the body, but it is stressful. How about home health, hospice or MDS coordinator for a nursing facility? Weekend RN supervisor for nursing facilities, home telephonic case management, the possibilities are only limited by what you desire.