ADN vs. BSN

Posted
by ace003 ace003 Member

Is there a difference in how prepared you are when you take the NCLEX after only 2 years of nursing school (Associate) vs. 4 years of nursing school (Bachelor)?

CT Pixie, BSN, RN

Has 10 years experience. 3,723 Posts

Is there a difference in how prepared you are when you take the NCLEX after only 2 years of nursing school (Associate) vs. 4 years of nursing school (Bachelor)?

I'm a little confused. Are you asking if the NCLEX is different for those holding an associate degree vs someone with a bacehlor degree? If that's what you're asking, then the answer is no. The test is the same no matter what degree you hold.

Are you asking if bachelor degree programs prepare you better for the NCLEX (because you have 4 yrs of schooling vs 2) again the answer, in my opinion is no. since we all take the same test, both the 2 and 4 year programs must teach you what you need to know in order to take the test.

One of the biggest differences between the two programs is that you have more general ed classes (english, maths, humanities etc) in the 4 yr program. you do have some extra nursing classes but those would not factor into knowledge to pass the NCLEX. Because, the NCLEX uses the same test no matter what. So they would not test an associate degree holder on classes that are normally reserved for a bachelor program.

Tumbler

Tumbler

87 Posts

Sometimes, I think you might find the ADN even more focused toward the NCLEX because you don't spend the extra time on the gen eds or the nursing content (leadership/management, research, public health) that won't appear on the exam.

SopranoKris, MSN, RN, APRN

Specializes in ER & Critical Care. Has 7 years experience. 3,148 Posts

No, you prepare the same way. There's no "advantage" on NCLEX for the BSN grad vs. ADN grad.

scaredsilly, BSN, RN

1 Article; 1,161 Posts

There is no difference based on your degree. Some schools prepare you better than others, so checking NCLEX pass rates for schools that offer the different programs is what you want to look at.

RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

A 4-year Bachelor program includes 2 years of core nursing coursework, as well as non-nursing classes that round out what makes up a Bachelor degree.

A 2-year Associate program includes 2 years of core nursing coursework, as well as co-requisite (and usually a year or so of pre-requisite) classes that round out what makes up an Associate degree.

Each degree contains the same amount of nursing classes and clinicals, so the preparation to take the NCLEX (minimum competency exam for entry-to-practice nurses) is the very same.

lululadyRN

lululadyRN

14 Posts

No. Whether you do an adn or bsn does not affect how well you do on the nclex. You'll be prepared either way. What may matter is the reputation of the school (nclex rate) regardless of whether it's a bsn or adn program. In my area, the local community college's adn program brags about how much better their nclex rate is compared to the local public university's bsn program.

I agree with what has been said so far, that the BSN offers no real advantage with regards to NCLEX. That said, the stat-lovers will tell you otherwise as, according to NCSBN, the passing rate is roughly 4% higher (at least this year) in favor of BSN vs ASN.

Newgrad2015rn

Newgrad2015rn

6 Posts

I dont think there is a difference. NCLEX is trying to find out if you will be a safe nurse, in the end ADN or BSN one doesnt trump the other in patient safety. I went to an ADN program and plan on moving on to get my BSN but regardless I passed my NCLEX on my first try in 84 questions with ADN.

RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

passing rate is roughly 4% higher.......

Eh, I'm one of those stats lovers, LOL, but don't pay any mind to this one. It's simply too variable, quarter by quarter, to have any value. Heck, the first quarter stats for 2015 had diploma programs as higher pass rates than either! But.... So what? Stats say a lot more about a situation than just a simple number, even trends. Guess I really am a stats geek, LOL!

suzw

suzw

208 Posts

Statistically, as someone said, there is a small difference in NCLEX pass rates, but it depends much more on the school. My ADN program in Washington state has a higher pass rate than the supposedly nationally top rated BSN program, by a few percentage points (on average for the past 3 years). And at least 5% higher than the $30,000/ year local private university. Most of my classmates are passing NCLEX in 75 questions, some more but I don't think anyone has failed yet. Not sure if this is because we focus a lot on NCLEX in our

last quarter, or if we are better prepared throughout the program.

That being said, there are a few ADN programs that have very low pass rates. They can be all over the map.

ace003

ace003

15 Posts

Thanks everyone for the comments. The school I go to has very low pass rates for the NCLEX so i guess that's why I posed the question because it is only a 2 year program. The school lacks structure and organization and I am aware that most of the studying is done independently but it alarms me that so few graduates have actually passed the NCLEX. But, I am aware that it depends on how well the school prepares you and how much effort you put it in.