Would you have called?

  1. Third grader has c/o earache which started less than 1 hour previously, afebrile, no crying or apparent distress and bilateral tympanic membranes are pearly gray. Tympanic membrane on side that is painful might have slight amount of fluid. Student states she takes allergy medicine but did not take it that day.
    Would you have called home?
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  2. 31 Comments

  3. by   MrNurse(x2)
    I would not have, unfortunately, I have to call about everything because a little came and said he hit his lip and the snowflake parents (dad, no less) was upset no one told them. I won't be posting this question, sad to say.
  4. by   SullyRN
    I probably wouldn't have called, but rather send an email or a little note home.

    The more I think about it, depending on the kid I may have even just told the kid to tell her parents when she gets home. If parent's get mad, we aren't doctors, we can't diagnose. And some nurses don't even have an otoscope on hand. I love mine.
  5. by   Farawyn
    Nope.
  6. by   ctate
    Yes. I remember one time when my daughter complained of a earache and with in 5 min she was crying and screaming because of the pain. She is not a complainer. So, I would have just made an informative call especially on a Friday morning or late afternoon Thursday.
  7. by   ruby_jane
    Not trying to second guess you...I might have called to see if parent wanted to provide pain relief, and to tell the parent that things did not look abnormal to me...but I am not a doctor so take the kid in if s/he complains at home. That's my standard spiel. Could that be achieved by an email or a form note- probably.

    I have high schoolers and they're likely to say they went to the nurse and the nurse DID NOTHING.

    I agree 100% about how I'd be more likely to call on a weekend/before a holiday.

    Did this one bounce back on you?
  8. by   kidzcare
    I probably would have called to see if a parent could bring in the forgotten medication. Often with earaches, I will call for a return visit but not the first visit (unless they are in distress)
  9. by   OldDude
    No. Elementary schoolers don't tolerate pain. You'd see some sign of discomfort. The exception would be if this kid is a Platinum Level Frequent Flier and has graduated to the "call every time they come in club."
  10. by   bluebonnetrn
    Yes, it bounced back.
    It wasn't late in the day, she wasn't crying or even perturbed, I told her to wait a little while and come back to the clinic if needed and if it was still hurting tonight to let mom/dad know. She was free to come back - they send kids all the time for nothing anyway. She didn't come back. She was apparently capable of telling them about the visit because I got a call from an upset snowflake daddy.
    He said she was getting a "fever" and reported a temp in the "low 99's". When I nicely explained that the American Academy of Pediatrics defines a fever as 100.5 he stated "not what my doctor says".

    Mainly what I am ticked about is the fact that despite ALL of the other things we have to do in a day we also have to call about unremarkable visits. I am upset that my BSN and 15 years of experience still gets me micromanaged by lay people. I am upset that we have to deal with people who get upset over absolutely nothing when there are so many other real priorities to worry about.
    I am also upset about the big picture, which has come up repeatedly in discussions here.
    What the heck is happening to people?? Why is everyone so unreasonable and edgy? Why are we teaching kids that the slightest moment of discomfort is time to run to the nurse or a doctor and make sure something is done about it? What the heck is going to happen when these kids are adults?
    And who is going to take care of us when we are old!?!?
    I just think it's all so ridiculous and I just want to slap everyone and say "STOP BEING A NUTJOB!"
  11. by   palli
    What the heck is happening to people?? Why is everyone so unreasonable and edgy? Why are we teaching kids that the slightest moment of discomfort is time to run to the nurse or a doctor and make sure something is done about it? What the heck is going to happen when these kids are adults?
    And who is going to take care of us when we are old!?!?

    entitlement, helicopter parents...I want to see this generation when they go to college and don't pass a test , how will they handle disappointments, they wont have a "safe" place..suck it up parents, let the snowflakes be disappointed once and awhile. Its not a reflection on your parenting.
  12. by   moreoreo
    Quote from bluebonnetrn
    I am also upset about the big picture, which has come up repeatedly in discussions here.
    What the heck is happening to people?? Why is everyone so unreasonable and edgy? Why are we teaching kids that the slightest moment of discomfort is time to run to the nurse or a doctor and make sure something is done about it? What the heck is going to happen when these kids are adults?
    And who is going to take care of us when we are old!?!?
    I just think it's all so ridiculous and I just want to slap everyone and say "STOP BEING A NUTJOB!"
    Omg. Yes. This is my greatest source of worry/annoyance/surprise as a new school nurse. When I was a child, I didn't even know that there WAS a school nurse. If I bumped my arm or knee or even skinned it I knew it would feel better with time. Meanwhile paper cuts, nosebleeds, minor "twisted ankle" injuries or "bumped my elbow on the wall but it feels fine" or "hit my finger in my desk" are all sent here like they need to be evaluated and treated immediately. Headaches and stomachaches that started "right now" as well. I want to teach all of them that minor discomforts are part of life and that they are strong resilient young people but I feel like their teachers also feel that each complaint is a genuine concern--which is great that they are so caring, but where will the children learn to tough through it? By the time they get to me their complaint is legitimized and it's hard to reverse the sense that they needed the visit!

    I don't have an otoscope, and although I work in elementary, I do not see many earaches. Depending on the student (is it a student I have never seen before that "never complains"?) I might give the parent a call as a head's up. Any time a child states "I didn't take my medicine" I usually give a courtesy call. But on a busy day if I did not get to make that call before the end of the day I would have felt comfortable backing up my non-call, especially because such an articulate child is capable of letting her parents know.

    (I work at a school where I was told to call even for little scrapes so I do make probably 30 calls a day... )
  13. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from palli
    I want to see this generation when they go to college and don't pass a test , how will they handle disappointments, they wont have a "safe" place..suck it up parents, let the snowflakes be disappointed once and awhile. Its not a reflection on your parenting.
    Academia is creating these people, colleges cater to this mindset. They have a well defined agenda that encourages conformity to a nanny state.
  14. by   Farawyn
    Kids don't know the difference between being uncomfortable and being in pain.

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