Do I need my BSN?

  1. 0
    Hey everyone,
    I am finishing up my ADN and have a job lined up. They recommended I didn't try to get my BSN until I have worked for at least a year, maybe two. At that point with two years under my belt, do I really need a BSN, or does it just look good on paper?
  2. 11 Comments so far...

  3. 4
    I agree that a new grad should wait a year and focus on becoming a fulling functioning nurse.

    And unless you plan to work in that one job for the rest of your professional life, yes you do need a BSN
    carolinapooh, Neisha_, llg, and 1 other like this.
  4. 1
    Depends on where you want to work. There are certain areas of the country that will only hire BSN, even with experience.
    llg likes this.
  5. 1
    I would say that if you ever desire to relocate (as some parts of the country especially urban areas are more BSN only) or a desire for career advancement, you should get it. I graduated with my diploma-RN and started my BSN program 6 months after graduating, after I was off of new grad orientation. I would not wait too long, as the chance of you actually going back to school will decrease the longer you wait. At least now school is fresh in your mind.
    carolinapooh likes this.
  6. 0
    If the option is ADN OR BSN, the BsN is best if you live in a big city. If you already have an RN, then do the bridge program. There is already talk of making the RN a bachelors prepared license. In 2015, the NP is moving to a PhD program, get ready!
  7. 0
    Quote from pandabear2185
    If the option is ADN OR BSN, the BsN is best if you live in a big city. If you already have an RN, then do the bridge program. There is already talk of making the RN a bachelors prepared license. In 2015, the NP is moving to a PhD program, get ready!
    The NP is not moving towards a PhD, but a DNP, which is different (shorter than PhD for one). Furthermore, the DNP is not a requirement for 2015.

    Also there has been talk for decades of requiring a BSN for entry level, and yet there has be no requirement in any state for a BSN for entry level.
  8. 0
    Go with what your job recommends, taking the first year to just learn to be a nurse. I did that and I'm very glad I did. Learning how to be a nurse is difficult and stressful, and it was a huge relief to come home and not have homework. I started after 1 year of nursing, and I'll have my BSN in December of this year. Definitely go for the BSN, but take the first year off for yourself.
  9. 0
    Quote from mable_may
    Hey everyone,
    I am finishing up my ADN and have a job lined up. They recommended I didn't try to get my BSN until I have worked for at least a year, maybe two. At that point with two years under my belt, do I really need a BSN, or does it just look good on paper?
    Depends on your local job market, where you want to work, and what your career aspirations are. I'll be honest: an ADN does limit your options. Most management/administration jobs want a BSN (and no, an ADN plus a non-nursing BA/BS doesn't necessarily equal BSN). In addition, most facilities are starting to demand that more of their staff have or obtain BSNs.

    I agree: take the first year and learn the ropes of nursing. Then worry about if/when you're going to pursue a BSN.
  10. 0
    A BSN (or higher) is important in some areas, but I wanted to mention that it is not required everywhere. My DON only has an ADN (at a hospital) and the one just prior to her only had an ADN also. My cousin is an ADN in another city, at another hospital, and she was promoted to DON at her facility. Most of our department managers have an ADN, including the ICU ones, but the head of our education department does have a master's. Apparently, in smaller areas, it matters more "who you know" than "what you know." I would take a year off, then see about your facility assisting you with tuition.
  11. 0
    If you're under 40, definitely plan on getting a BSN, if you intend on staying in nursing and you don't already have a BS in another discipline.

    If you feel like starting it now, do it. Start slowly... one class at a time.

    Good luck!


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