Who's Afraid of the Big, Bad Psych Patients - page 2

Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Psych Patient? Whenever I tell people I use to be a psych nurse, I usually get one of two reactions. "That's so interesting--tell me more." Or, far more... Read More

  1. Visit  PrisonPsychRN profile page
    1
    Thank you so much for posting this valuable article! I appreciate the perspective you gave on treating and managing psychiatric patients!
    I currently am employed in a correctional payshiatric facility. I love it! I cannot imagine working anywhere else. Just as you said, my patients are just like anyone else, they recognize when they are not feeling well and will voice their problems, sometime they just need to spek to someone, or they need to have the nurse ask the questions to get them to open up.
    I really wish there would be more psychiatric nursing covered in nursing classes!
    CBsMommy likes this.
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  3. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    1
    Great article! I remember when I did my psych rotation in school, my instructor was impressed that I could talk to the patients so easily. My reaction was "yeah? I've been around these people my whole life." There are actually very few mental illnesses I haven't dealt with in my personal life with either family or friends. I don't know anyone with diagnosed personality disorders (though I know a few who I'm pretty sure have undiagnosed ones) but I can't even count the number of people I know with depression, anxiety, eating disorders, PTSD, bipolar, etc. And, as the author points out very eloquently, most of these people you could talk to/know and never realize it unless they told you.
    Been there,done that likes this.
  4. Visit  CBsMommy profile page
    0
    Beautifully written article! I remember that I was SO afraid to walk into my first day of psych clinical rotations. I chose to go out of my comfort zone and chose the acute ward with people fresh off the street and not so stable. The first day, I hid not only behind the large desk and out of the way but behind the nurses that worked on the unit. As the days in clinical progressed, I was able to have numerous conversations with several of the patients, be involved in their activities and groups and really started to open my mind and learned about the lives of these patients. Most of those people lived through things that I could never imagine. I hope to always keep the lessons I learned from these wonderful patients with me as I move forward in my career!
  5. Visit  gonzo1 profile page
    0
    Very well written with lots of good information. Thanks for sharing. There does need to be more education in nursing on our psych patients because so many of our "regular" patients have huge psych issues.
  6. Visit  hello sammi profile page
    0
    Great article that sheds a lot of light on an often overlook specialty. Thanks for broadening my perspective - I will keep this in mind when it's time to complete my psych clinicals =]
  7. Visit  Meriwhen profile page
    1
    This article made the APNA's Facebook page

    Go psych nursing!
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Jan 6, '12
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
  8. Visit  rn/writer profile page
    0
    Thanks for letting me know.
    Last edit by rn/writer on Jan 7, '12
  9. Visit  Whispera profile page
    0
    Good article. It sounds alot like the speech I give my nursing students at the start of each semester. I'm glad you posted it!
  10. Visit  Miss Elaine profile page
    0
    i have seen this fear of the mentally ill patient in student nurses and my fellow nurse. the preparation for clinical in the psychiatric field in nursing, is focused on safety of the novice and student nurse. this sometimes can be frightening when students are told to always be closest to the wall and door, told by instructors to always travel in pairs, and know where the panic button is located.clinical instruction in psychiatric nursing may need to be reevaluated.


    staff note:
    font and print size change for easier reading.
    Last edit by rn/writer on Feb 21, '12
  11. Visit  KristeyK profile page
    1
    I just stumbled across this terrific article! I'm with Miss Elaine- instruction needs to be reevaluated for a lot of people. I had a TERRIFIC Psych instructor who made sure we spent VERY little time at the nurse's station. We were there to help pass meds and and ask a few questions, otherwise, we were out with the patients. I had ZERO interest in Psych when I did the rotation earlier this semester, now I have to say I LOVE it!!! It is second on my list to getting to work in a pediatric area. We had a VERY high acuity rate three of the four days I got to spend there, and it fascinated me to no end to sit and talk with these VERY ill patients. They deserve as much care and attention as everyone does.
    And thinking back to what the author said about looking in the mirror because that's what mentally ill looks like: Our clinical instructor liked to say that we're ALL only a door away from mental illness.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
  12. Visit  GitanoRN profile page
    0
    Quote from kristeyk
    our clinical instructor liked to say that we're all only a door away from mental illness.
    we must have had the same instructor, that's the first sentence that came out of my instructor during my clinical, long ago
  13. Visit  Dulce29 profile page
    0
    hi i have a question
    do psych hospitals only hire RN nurses
  14. Visit  Dulce29 profile page
    0
    Also thank you for posting this . Ifound it very helpful


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