Tips on getting an A in A&P1? - page 2

by avalee

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I just purchased Anatomy and Physiology Made Incredibly Easy online, and hope to start in on that book before class begins. Has anyone else used this book? Did you pull an A? For those of you who were able to earn A's in... Read More


  1. 0
    thank you all so much! I didn't realize I would get this many ideas! you all are so great. I am actually very excited to apply these techniques and study my tail off! (even if I study more than necessary I figure it will be great preparation for nursing school!)thanks again!
  2. 0
    My suggestions:

    Form a study group. Make plans to get together at least once a week, more if you can all swing it. Every single session I have with my group, I leave feeling like we made huge progress. Make sure to avoid the "Chatty Cathy" type people though. They will bog down your group and want to spend the session time gossiping. (Speaking from experience!)

    Buy lots and lots of notecards and highlighters. I easily hit 1000 notecards all semester.

    Every day after class, as soon as you get home, go over your notes and material that you learned in that class. While it's fresh, make your notecards. Don't wait until the next day or later. Like someone mentioned before, you will get lots of new information every class so waiting to cram before a test WILL NOT work. Make your notecards, study guide, etc as you go along so that you can be more effective when studying before a test.

    Keep a small binder (like 1.5" ring binder) to hold your lecture notes and lab handouts. Use a hole-puncher to add any sheets your instructor hands out. I use one that's portable enough that I can easily grab it to read while waiting at my kids' functions or just to sit on the back porch and review. After each test, I empty it and it's ready for the next test's material. I also keep my notecards in my purse usually so if I'm stuck waiting at a doctor's office or something, I can pull them out and flip through them a few times.

    If your book comes with an additional online resource (like Mastering A&P) use it! They have good visual aids, puzzles, spelling quizzes, fill in the blank, etc.

    Good luck to you!
  3. 0
    Flashcards.....lots of flashcards. Also make sure that you do the reading before class so that you can understand the lecture and ask questions about parts you do not understand.
  4. 0
    Honestly, I was not a person who liked group studying, either, which is why I recommend the study group so highly. Our first day of lecture, our professor spoke repeatedly of the advantages of a study group. Because of that, two other ladies and I started getting together a couple times a week to do homework and go over the concepts. The most advantageous part of the study group is talking through the concepts -- especially if one of us is having trouble grasping it. Those discussions, that time teaching each other, helps cement the information into our heads. That's something I wouldn't get studying on my own.

    I do agree on the studying every day. In fact, we got an e-mail prior to the beginning of the semester that suggested if we didn't feel like we could dedicate at least three hours PER DAY to studying, we may want to re-evaluate our situation and try taking the class during a semester when we had more time to dedicate. They weren't kidding. Three hours per day is actually on the low side of studying for me. I read over my notes every day, re-listen to lectures while I'm working out or while I'm driving, quiz myself with flash cards, talk my family's ears off about the concepts, watch YouTube videos, or watch the DVD lectures we received with our textbook package. I color in my A&P coloring book. I spend time studying the models in Open Lab.

    I don't do all those things every day, but I do read over my notes daily. I'm re-listening to lectures whenever I'm alone in the car (a 45-minute commute to school helps with that). When I'm showering I'm reviewing action potentials or bones or muscles (depending on the unit we're working on). And I really am starting to drive my husband insane with my incessant chatter.

    Just make sure you access the information in some form or fashion every day. That was something we learned in Intro to Psych: the more frequently you access information, the higher importance your brain puts on it and therefore makes that info more readily available.
  5. 0
    Don't cramp, make time in your schedule, DO NOT MISS CLASS, study, study, study, and study.
  6. 0
    Study, study, study! I am in A&P now and have around a 98% in the class. There is a lot of information to learn and "cramming" will not get it done. Take advantage to lab time and never leave early. I seem to get my best advice after the class has officially ended. I make notecards and take them everywhere with me. I study around 1-2 hours/day, sometimes more, including the weekends. Also, having the right attitude towards the class. It is easy to become overwhelmed with all the material and get discouraged. But, break everything down into small segments and just keep at it. Good luck!!
  7. 0
    Study, like everyone has said. But, really, study! All the time! I got an A through hard work. It's not easy. There's a ton of memorization. Thanks for whoever posted that leg video. Brought back great memories. I won't ever forget those muscles.
  8. 0
    I have a 4.0 in all of my science pre reqs. The key for me was creating flash cards after every lecture. I also went over my notes everyday. The more repetition, the more you will remember. I would also copy my notes or quiz myself and write out the answers. The more times you write something, the easiest it is to remember. Good luck!
  9. 0
    I have a test today and as I'm studying for the test, I thought of something else I do. I try to remember things in a way that it is meaningful to me. It may sound totally unscientific but that it is ok. Yes, I do refer to one of the muscles as 'the little guy' because compared to all the long muscles around him, he is short. I don't do flash cards myself but I do mental flash cards in a way. Basically, I think of a body part and list all the things mentally in terms of what we are currently studying. I do this at stop lights, throughout the day randomly, etc. I'd study more if I felt I needed to and I think I studied the most for our first test because I was nervous about a new subject but now that I've found my rhythm, I study maybe 2-3 hours/week and prior to a test, maybe 4-5 hours that week.

    I also have an iPad and some anatomy tools on it that help me visualize things outside of lab if I am having issues with a particular part of anatomy. And even though I don't do flash cards, I do believe in the link between writing and memory so it helps me to write things out, especially things that I'm having a tough time remembering. I just do it in my notebook though.
  10. 0
    I found this to also work for me. I did not use note cards either. When I learned the muscles I associated them with something else or gave them a different name. This helps me in all my classes. I also take notes in class, read them, and rewrite them. I do believe in the 7 rep rule. If you repeat something 7 times it will stay in your long term memory.


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