low income---> chance to go to a university

  1. Im a 16 year old student who is currently taking up her BSN or ADN prerequisites in a community college (not yet sure which path to take). does the path towards BSN cost more than that of the ADN? you see guys, my family has a low income yet, i want to pursue my dream of becoming a BSN graduate. basically, i just want to ask if a child like me, with a low income family, would have a chance to enroll at prestigious universities? people tell me that i'm still young and could perhaps take ADN first then BSN. but the problem is, i want to help my family financially immediately plus the fact that i want to get hold of a BSN diploma. what are your thoughts? you guys are my only hope. i wish you could help me. (calstate long beach-this is my choice) it would really make a big help if you would response to my thread. God bless
    Last edit by barbie q on Nov 14, '06
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   lisabeth
    I would say most definitely. There are grants and student loans. Check into it. An RN told me not long ago, that a pell grant that gets used up in lvn school starts all over again for rn. I would assume the same would be true for bsn. That is because it is considered a whole different degree.
    Good Luck!!!
  4. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from TexasAngel
    I would say most definitely. There are grants and student loans. Check into it. An RN told me not long ago, that a pell grant that gets used up in lvn school starts all over again for rn. I would assume the same would be true for bsn. That is because it is considered a whole different degree.
    Good Luck!!!
    :yeahthat:
    Get all the financial aid that you can!!!! Good luck to you
  5. by   BeccaznRN
    Oh, most definitely the BSN route costs more. However, the CSUs are still pretty reasonable compared with my BSN program (about $6500 per semester). I got the maximum awards for Pell Grants, then maxed out the federal student loans and also had to take out alternative loans. Loans, loans, loans! Don't let the cost be a deterrent to your dream though....it may cost you, but it's money well spent.

    Best of luck to you!
  6. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from StlRn2b1206
    Oh, most definitely the BSN route costs more. However, the CSUs are still pretty reasonable compared with my BSN program (about $6500 per semester). I got the maximum awards for Pell Grants, then maxed out the federal student loans and also had to take out alternative loans. Loans, loans, loans! Don't let the cost be a deterrent to your dream though....it may cost you, but it's money well spent.

    Best of luck to you!
    A student loan is not a "loan" so to speak...it's not the same as getting a loan for a "Hummer" or other nonsense....it's an investment in your future.
  7. by   barbie q
    oh thanks guys for your responses! they help alot!....
    Last edit by barbie q on Nov 15, '06
  8. by   4evrhisma
    I would pursue all the financial aid possible! When I got my 1st. bachelors, I went to a community college for three years, and worked on getting good grades. I come from a low income family, and was the first person in my family to go to college. When I applied to universities, I got close to a full ride to Rutgers University, which was out of state, but had a good program in what I wanted to do, one of the top five programs in the country. I had to take out loans just for living expenses, because the academic scholarships covered all the rest. If my grades dropped, I was going to loose it, so I had to keep my grades up. It is possible to go to a university with coming from a low income family. Just let the school know you really want to go but can't afford it, and show them what you do have, instead of what you don't have.
  9. by   Lovely_RN
    I think you should go the BSN route since you are a low income student. If you apply to a state school you might be covered completely by financial aid. If your family is very low income your estimated family contribution may be 0 or close to it; you might get through school with very few or no loans at all. Once you get any type of nursing license and start making money you aren't going to be eligible for as much assistance and will end up taking more loans to get through. I also think that if you are young and childless you should do it now before your circumstances change. I know you want to help your family and I don't mean to sound heartless but they are already poor and used to it. Once you get a BSN you will be in a much better position to help them out financially because you will be able to work full-time. It will be harder to contribute financially if you say, get an lpn or adn license first and try to balance work and school at the same time. That might make you give up on getting a bsn so that you can work more to help the family out.
  10. by   augigi
    And don't worry about a "prestigious" university - you get the same degree wherever you go. Go where you can afford it.
  11. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from barbie q
    oh thanks guys for your responses! they help alot!....
    Another thing...start out at your local community college for your prerequisites. I am taking all mine at CC towards BSN....it's much cheaper and it makes no difference in quality. Sometimes you get better quality in prerequisites than at Universities. Your community college financial aid office can help you with application for financial assistance.
  12. by   BSNtobe2009
    There really isn't a reason for someone not to go to school anymore (when they are young) because of money. There is more than enough money available through financial aid and loans to see you through.

    My HIGH recommendation is to live on campus for as long as possible. This is the cheapest route to go as far as housing, and to me, is the REAL college experience and alot of fun. I wouldn't have traded it for anything. Don't get mixed up in roommates, leases, deposits, and all of that crap...I've been there, done that, and it's not worth it. I have had to sue more than one former roommate for leaving me hundreds of dollars in the hole on unpaid utilities, high phone bills, and unpaid rent.

    That way you don't have all of the damands of school, plus the hassle of paying bills, keeping up a household, doing grocery shopping cooking meals, cleaning...ah! Just leave it up to the dorm and the school.
  13. by   barbie q
    thanks for all your replies. they're great help. which do you think is harder to get in: an ADN program or BSN program? what are your experiences?
  14. by   arciedee
    Quote from barbie q
    thanks for all your replies. they're great help. which do you think is harder to get in: an ADN program or BSN program? what are your experiences?
    I think it depends on where in the country you are. I've heard that in some areas it's easier to get into a BSN program than an ADN program because of wait lists. You may want to post that question in your state's forum.

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