Do CNA's Make better RN's? HELP!! - page 2

HELP!! My girlfriend is badgering me to get my CNA before going to Nursing School for my RN. (I start in the fall of 2007 @ OJC La Junta) She was a CNA and is an OT now and she believes that... Read More

  1. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from jdfar
    Don't do it. You will learn it in nursing school. Being a CNA is not like being a nurse. I actually think there are disadvantages to doing it. This was the advice given to me by a nursing instructor before I started nursing school. I have a great relationship with patients and all team members I work with and I wasn't a CNA first. I have plenty of empathy for CNA's and the work they do, and help them out in any way I can- as they usually do for me. You have alot on your plate allready. Good luck in nursing school.
    RN for 16 years.
    Your instructor and my mentor (an RN with a Master's who had also taught) were on the same page.

    steph
  2. by   Tweety
    Quote from iceyspots
    In my opinion, for the students in my clinical group who were CNA's before had an easier time during first clinical rotation
    And that's where it ended because Semester 1 is basic care. Beyond that first semester, as you advance to more of an RN role, they are on equal footing by that point.
  3. by   bethin
    I don't think it's a necessity but if you have time I would take the classes. When you do start clinicals you'll already know the basics - bathing, turning, etc. Also, you would be more comfortable and confident around patients.
  4. by   little black cat
    And it gives me more confidence as a jittery, timid student nurse at clinical when I find out that the big, bad, intimidating nurse I have to work with has only been in healthcare half the time I've been.
  5. by   little black cat
    Quote from little black cat
    And it gives me more confidence as a jittery, timid student nurse at clinical when I find out that the big, bad, intimidating nurse I have to work with has only been in healthcare half the time I've been.
  6. by   lainith
    I wondered this myself and wanted to get my CNA certification before entering NS but it's just not an option for me now that I finally got in. I looked into taking courses over the summer but found that no one near where I am offers courses during the summer.

    I worked for about four years doing home health care, etc. working with handicapped people and am hoping that the experience I have from doing that line of work will be enough to help me feel confident in clinical. I honestly have no idea what CNA's do so I don't know if I basically did the same things or not. We also did our own state-type paperwork for every shift so I am hoping that will help me out with learning charting, too.
  7. by   Butterfliesnroses
    I do respect/like most of the nurses that worked as aides before. But that's because they're not above getting resident's ice water. They know how it feels like. They respect the aides more. BUT and this is a big BUT it depends on the nurse. Because I've had nurses that were aides before talk down to me. I've also seen nurses that were never aides be super helpful and respectful. The nurses I've talked to say that being an aide before nursing school helps in the first year SO much. They said the first year is so easy because of there experience as an aide. I'm taking my last year of pre-reqs and I work as a CNA in a nursing home. I have my job after nursing school. So that's one stressor gone. It could help you get a foot in the door also. But I'm sure there are downsides. And if it's going to cause you stress and if you won't work as one then why do it? Especially since from what I hear the first quarter is mainly CNA duties.
  8. by   JINPDX
    It's not necessary, but good luck getting a job with all the hiring freezes going on in the country. I've spoken to many recruiters and they all have told me that they are only hiring in-house. Some are hiring new grads but it is ULTRA competitive. Working from the ground up not only insures you have a job after you're done with NS, but the experience is invaluable. Most hospitals offer some sort of tuition reimbursement, and in some cases will pay for your education outright. The experience plus not being in debt when I finally finish school convinced me to get mine. I do not understand people on here who say not to do it.

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