CNA ? Is it really gross and why do we have to? - page 3

I'm new to all this. I have just applied to a 2 year program and was told I have to be a CNA before my first nursing class. What exactly do they teach you and what do you do? I'm afraid it will be... Read More

  1. by   pristy
    12 pack of diet coke on the counter. There was a note on it. To: Sue thanks more than you will ever know. From ***** I was so impressed and amazed I didn't know what all I had done for him.

    It is things like these stories that keep me going that makes my reasononing for being a nurse relevant.[/QUOTE]

    Wow, those stories make me really look forward to being a CNA. I guess I need to focus more on the people and not their problems. Thanks
  2. by   galaxy781
    thats why i wanted to be a nurse!!!!
  3. by   Csunkis
    Quote from pristy
    I'm new to all this. I have just applied to a 2 year program and was told I have to be a CNA before my first nursing class. What exactly do they teach you and what do you do? I'm afraid it will be really gross. I know nursing won't always be easy, but don't CNA's have the icky jobs all the time? I want to do it, just to prove I can, but would like to know what I'm getting into. Do they require this to weed out the squeamish?
    I'm 16 and am a junior in high school. I recently got my CNA license and have been working in a nursing home for some time now. Let me tell ya being 16 and have to perform perineal care and picking up poo really makes you appreciate life. But yes the duties that you perform are gross but you get used to it and when a patient thanks you for helping them out all worries about the job disappear. It wasn't pretty at the beginning but helping out the patients and getting to know them has been such an amazing experience. Trust me it's not as bad as everyone makes it seem. I wouldn't trade any of my experiences!
    CC
  4. by   AKAKatydid
    Quote from Sue7573
    sorry my last post was so long I just get a little passionate when it comes to my residents

    Sue
    Thank you Sue!
    I wonder how I hadn't seen this thread until today... I swear that made me tear up! And it's funny that I see it this morning... because this morning was one of those mornings/nights for me. (I work 3rd shift as a tech). Bear with me because this is a long one too... and I'm way past my bedtime!

    We have one pt who is a DNR, that is just a poor mess. She's not doing too well, and has been here about 2 weeks... She is a total care, incontinent, who moans in agony every time she is touched. (She is unable to communicate) Her granddaughter is in her mid-30's and has been staying by her side day and night for the past week... The granddaughter has been so helpful, she gets up and gowns up before I can even think to ask a nurse for help moving her. Wow!! (Grandma has C-diff... and for those of you who haven't had the pleasure, lets just say runny, stinky, and contagious)

    Well this morning, when I went to take vitals and clean her mess, Grandma didn't even make a peep when I moved her around. When I was done, I combed her hair, and washed her face, and she just looked right into my eyes smiling. It was like you could feel every inch of appreciation and sincerity. Sometimes they don't need to say anything for you to know how much you've done, because you can see it in their face. I tried so hard not to cry. I don't think I'll ever forget "momma" (that's what I've been calling her) and the look in her eyes. She truly touched my heart last night.

    The grandaughter told me that when it is all over with her grandmother, she is thinking about becoming a CNA.

    This is the reason why I got into nursing!!! (believe it or not, literally... when my grandfather was ill and dying, I was so moved by the medical staff. When he passed away, I quit my job to learn to be a nurse. I can so relate to the granddaughter)
  5. by   mariedoreen
    CNA classes are often required before admittance to nursing school for several reasons, a couple of the big ones are that: programs have found in the past that they lost several students because these students had really had no exposure to the profession prior to nursing school and they discovered that it wasn't for them. It was hoped that if they had CNA training prior, they may have been able to make that decision before taking these spots away from students who would have stayed. Also, since in some programs you would have a lot of CNAs and a lot who knew nothing about patient care it made the curriculum difficult... either those without CNA experience were not learning enough of the basics or those who were CNAs were being forced to sit through things they knew very well. Requiring all to be CNAs prior to admittance leveled the playing field so to speak and helped to ensure that most were on the same page.

    RNs are responsible for ALL the care that their patient receives on their shift. If they're lucky they'll have a CNA to assist them with some of the aspects of that care, but they are never at a point where they don't do it at all. CNAs may be tied up with other patients, or they may call in sick, or the RN may simply need to give that bath herself because she needs to do a very thorough skin assessment, or often she's working with the CNA to help reposition her patient or clean up the pt's BM etc... because for this patient it's a two person job...

    What you are going to learn in your CNA class is simply the beginning of what you need to know to be a good nurse. In a sense, it is the first term of the program for you. Embrace it and learn well because you're going to use the skills you learn there every shift you ever work.
  6. by   LPN1974
    I only read the original post, and I think when you get out of nursing school and really get to working, you might find there is aLOT more to gross than when you worked as a CNA.
    Believe me, it can be worse than assisting someone with bathing, toileting, and brushing teeth.
  7. by   traumaRUs
    I just wanted to thank Sue and Katydid. You are both true professionals and asset to nursing. I would hope that when I get older, the CNA's are half as kind as you two - thanks so much for the smile.
  8. by   TheMaestroOfGotham
    I can't wait to get my CNA. I want to get as much as clinical experience as possible before I start the RN program. I don't mind flying turds. :stone
  9. by   Stdy2BaNurse
    Quote from Sue7573
    sorry my last post was so long I just get a little passionate when it comes to my residents

    Sue
    Sue,

    As a "pre-nursing student" feeling on the brink, ready to quit, will finals week ever be over....I want to say thank you.

    This is such a reminder of why I chose to do what I am doing. I watched the excellent care (physical/emotional - out of the way care) that both my grandfather and then my grandmother received during their 'home' stays before passing on. I sit here with tears. Probably a mix of emotion from memories and emotion from being reminded of why this is so important for me to do. I want to be that nurse that offers compassion (not just to the patient). I want to give back what was given to me; albeit indirectly.

    To everyone that has shared their experiences, Thank you!!

    - Traci
  10. by   sHaMpOo_mE
    Quote from Jetaime684
    Did you know that when they didnt have all this high-tech stuff, doctors and nurses use to TASTE people's urine to check to see if it tasted sweet (diabetes test)? We have it good! Maybe read on up some of the heros/heroines in our profession, and see that its not so bad, becuase its for a good cause.
    Wow....thats truly gross and very risky, didn't know that ._.
  11. by   Princess74
    I start LPN school in August and I just want to say that nurses and all others in the healthcare field can really change someones life, just by truely being caring to the patient and their families.
    The entire reason that I am becoming a Nurse is because there was this wonderful nurse that took care of my dad while in the ICU. To make a very long story short she was the only compassionate nurse there. She was so great with my dad and our entire family. Dad really responded to her, teased her and hugged her. He knew that as long as she was there he would be well taken care of. Despite of her and everyone elses efforts DR's etc... it became clear that my father would soon pass away. I was such a mess cause I was a daddys girl and she was just so nice to me, so caring. She even came in on here day off to see that dad was getting everything he needed to stay comfortable. Now thats dedication!!!! And when we were waiting for the machines to be disconnected she came to my family and told us that it was her privelage to have know my father and that he was such a wonderful man and that she knew that when she got to heaven he would be on the shores waving to her. Now thats one heck of a great nurse. I will NEVER EVER forget her and what she did for my family. If I can help patients and their families out in difficult situations and make such a difference in their lives all the gross stuff will be worth it.
    Just my 2 cents.
  12. by   BENNETTRN
    Quote from pristy
    I'm new to all this. I have just applied to a 2 year program and was told I have to be a CNA before my first nursing class. What exactly do they teach you and what do you do? I'm afraid it will be really gross. I know nursing won't always be easy, but don't CNA's have the icky jobs all the time? I want to do it, just to prove I can, but would like to know what I'm getting into. Do they require this to weed out the squeamish?
    Pristy-
    Scenario- You start off to your first pts room after report to start your assessments. You discover the pt who you know is disoriented has pulled out his IV, blood everywhere, and has had a BM that has now covered every square inch of the bed. What do you do? Do you just walk away and find a CNA to clean it up. I certainly hope not! You will indeed need help if it is available. But you remember you became a nurse to help others. Nursing is not about rank, it doesnt matter if you are a RN LPN or CNA, we all have to get our hands dirty to ensure the pt recieves the best possible care.

    I was a CNA for a few years before becoming a RN and would not trade the experience I gained as a CNA. You should also remember as others have said before there are area's of nursing that do not have CNA's. I work in labor and delivery and its just me to clean up the mess, but I dont give it a second thought. I am a nurse and I take care of my pts like I would want to be treated.
  13. by   Sue7573
    Quote from BENNETTRN
    Pristy-
    Scenario- You start off to your first pts room after report to start your assessments. You discover the pt who you know is disoriented has pulled out his IV, blood everywhere, and has had a BM that has now covered every square inch of the bed. What do you do? Do you just walk away and find a CNA to clean it up. I certainly hope not! You will indeed need help if it is available. But you remember you became a nurse to help others. Nursing is not about rank, it doesnt matter if you are a RN LPN or CNA, we all have to get our hands dirty to ensure the pt recieves the best possible care.

    I was a CNA for a few years before becoming a RN and would not trade the experience I gained as a CNA. You should also remember as others have said before there are area's of nursing that do not have CNA's. I work in labor and delivery and its just me to clean up the mess, but I dont give it a second thought. I am a nurse and I take care of my pts like I would want to be treated.

    "I AM A NURSE AND I TAKE CARE OF MY PTS LIKE I WOULD WANT TO BE TREATED" That is exactly the way I feel, treat people the way you would want to be treated. I am saying that if everyone treated each other like that, there wouldn't be any troubles in the world.

    Sue.

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