Chemistry not required for nursing program? - page 3

Hi guys! I applied to a school and found out that chemistry is not a pre req for their nursing program and you don't have to take it at all. Is that normal?... Read More

  1. Visit  brenay profile page
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    Quote from SopranoKris
    Our Pharmacology courses must be completely different then. We had to know the chemical structure & physiological effects of the drugs as well as the nursing implications, side effects, contraindications, etc. If I didn't have a solid foundation in Chem before taking it, I would have been lost.Seems like there is some disparity amongst programs...
    Elaborate when you say "chemical structure."
  2. Visit  ßåߥ profile page
    1
    Quote from SopranoKris
    Our Pharmacology courses must be completely different then. We had to know the chemical structure & physiological effects of the drugs as well as the nursing implications, side effects, contraindications, etc. If I didn't have a solid foundation in Chem before taking it, I would have been lost.
    No, not all that different. We didn't have to know the chemical structure per say but we were taught and tested on the effect of each drug in relation to receptors and all that jazz. Even though I didn't know the chemical structure of the drug, I still knew what the drug did which gave me what SE I could see, why there were certain contraindications, and what I could do as the nurse.

    Don't get me wrong, I fully support having Chemistry as part as part of the RN curriculum, but just because I didn't do well in Chemistry doesn't mean my Pharmacology class was a joke.
    brenay likes this.
  3. Visit  ßåߥ profile page
    1
    Quote from GrnTea
    Seriously, does somebody actually think that knowledge of basic chemistry is of no value in nursing and something to be avoided if at all possible? Good grief, you're scaring me here. I'm getting afraid to get old and risk hospitalization if that's really true. ::shudder::

    (We took one full year of chemistry plus one semester of organic chemistry....and yes, I did use it at work.)
    I think it is of value, but I mean, if your school doesn't require it, the school must not think it is a big deal...

    Don't worry! I'll take good care of you!
    Plus, I would like to become a CRNA, so I will be retaking my Chemistry course for a refresher and Chemistry II. I'll be better, promise!
    brenay likes this.
  4. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    1
    Quote from brenay
    Elaborate when you say "chemical structure."
    Seriously?

    Knowing that a protein molecule, for example, has parts that interact with parts of drug molecules and that's why the drug is structured to work to block the protein, thus treating the disease state. Knowing that positive and negative charges are why and how fluids and electrolytes travel across cell membranes. Knowing what osmolarity is and why there are may causes of edema. Knowing that the way sodium channels work is how a nerve impuse travels along an axon and the membrane repolarizes (and hey, what's "repolarizes"?), so when serum sodium is deranged, you get neuro effects. Knowing how calcium ion charges affect neuromuscular communication. When somebody says a drug is a MAO inhibitor, what's that mean? I could go on and on.

    "I don't need to know that to take care of patients." Oh, probably not, if you are satisfied with what's apparently turning into drone/superCNA/task-oriented training. IMHO, though, loss of that sort of bigger picture makes for a limited practice. More education makes you more able to understand what you're seeing and what should be happening. That's the nurse I want.
    nursel56 likes this.
  5. Visit  upstateRNhopeful profile page
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    I go to a community college and we have to have chem (and bio) within 5 years to move on to A&P.
  6. Visit  mytwoboysmom profile page
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    I think Chem should be a pre-req for A&P. When I took A&P I never could wrap my mind around some of the concepts. Now that I have taken Chem, it is all much clearer. I truly think a disservice is being done not to require Chem. The program I am trying to get into does not require Chem. You do have to have another science series either Chem I&II, Bio I&II, or Physics I&II. The nursing advisor told me that Chem would be the most helpful. With my hands shaking I signed up for Chem and it was the best thing I had done. One chapter on Chemistry at the front of your A&P book is not enough. I would strongly recomend taking Chem even if it is not part of your program.
  7. Visit  brenay profile page
    2
    Quote from GrnTea
    Seriously? Knowing that a protein molecule, for example, has parts that interact with parts of drug molecules and that's why the drug is structured to work to block the protein, thus treatinmg the disease state. Knowing that positive and negative charges are why and how fluids and electrolytes travel across cell membranes. Knowing what osmolarity is and why there are may causes of edema. Knowing that the way sodium channels work is how a nerve impuse travels along an axon and the membrane repolarizes (and hey, what's "repolarizes"?), so when serum sodium is deranged, you get neuro effects. Knowing how calcium ion charges affect neuromuscular communication. When somebody says a drug is a MAO inhibitor, what's that mean? I could go on and on."I don't need to know that to take care of patients." Oh, probably not, if you are satisfied with what's apparently turning into drone/superCNA/task-oriented training. IMHO, though, loss of that sort of bigger picture makes for a limited practice. More education makes you more able to understand what you're seeing and what should be happening. That's the nurse I want.
    Wow. So because I ask what you mean by chemical structure, I'm immediately unsuitable or incompetent for nursing? That's hilarious & nice to know by the way. Thanks for that. And although you didn't say I was, I know what you are insinuating. Repolarizes? Yeah, I knew what that meant. Of course i did. I think Chemistry should be required but a little fear of the subject does not make us dumb or unfit for nursing. All of what you explained in your previous post, I understood. That's because of a great background in A&P 1 & 2. I really don't like when people try to undermine or make someone feel lesser than what they truly are just because they may be a little hesitant or uncertain about how to approach a subject or about a subject as a whole. You're like some of the kids I take classes with whom look at you with disgust or shame when you ask the professor to go over something again or if you ask him a question regarding the previous topics you covered before. Do I like Chemistry? No. Lol. It's my very very least favorite subject. But, I won't let anything stop me from being a nurse. I will take on Chemistry and I will excel at it. I will feel very good about it and I will be one step closer to helping the millions of people who may need my help. People want nurses whom of course are smart, (which you obviously have no trouble in that area right?) loving, encouraging, compassionate, and uplifting. Did I mention uplifting? To all my fellow pre nursing students we can do this. I love to encourage people. But hey you guys be sure to tackle that Chemistry because if you don't you're an inadequate human being who should probably think about another profession because you won't be the type of nurse that people "want."

    Oh how I love my sarcasm. Not replying to this particular thread anymore! see ya guys on other threads
    Last edit by brenay on Jan 6, '13
    gummi bear and mytwoboysmom like this.
  8. Visit  meeep profile page
    1
    Oh please. If that were true, every nursing school would require it just as they require A&P. The fact that a large number of schools deem it optional tells you something. It's not like you're going to be expected to balance a chemical equation at the bedside. Not sure why people act like you do.
    brenay likes this.
  9. Visit  christina731 profile page
    0
    My ADN program does not require any chem, but the 3 BSN programs in my city do, So if I plan on getting a BSN in the future I will have to tackle that beast. I chose this ADN program specifically for the lack of chemistry requirement. I have bad memories from HS chem that I would not like to re live!
  10. Visit  ~Melissa~ profile page
    0
    The community colleges in my area do not require chemistry, but to bridge into the BSNS programs, I think all require chemistry and history (which I will take at my leisure after I finish my ADN)... Fair enough trade off, IMO... I can work as an RN sooner this way but finish up my degree fully in the long term
  11. Visit  princesax11 profile page
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    I don't like chem too much. I took it in 2010 for the ADN program I was applying to and got a B. Then I moved out of state and now that class doesn't even matter haha. It really depends on the individual school if you have to take it or not. I don't think it really will help me be a better nurse. If chem is a requirement it is usually just chem 1 and you don't get completely in depth with it.
  12. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    1
    My ADN program doesn't require chemistry, but my bridge program does.

    I have take chemistry, however, and I haven't really met up with any nursing components that absolutely required an in depth knowledge of chemistry. Perhaps there have been a few things that I didn't have to learn thanks to past courses, but nothing that wasn't/couldn't be taught on a simple level in nursing school.

    I have no issue with expecting nurses to have a string science background, but chemistry? I'm not aghast over it. I think a chemistry for allied health course would be a great addition.
    brenay likes this.
  13. Visit  ßåߥ profile page
    0
    Yea-huh! My patient needs to know that he's on a diuretic, and I'm gonna be all like, "So you don't absorb the ions which include electrons and protons and it's chemically impossible to have electrons with identical quantum numbers, so therefore you either have a negative or positive charges, in which your case you have a decreased positive charge, a cation, because er.... You're peeing more because you have too much fluid.

    Sorry...

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